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Vol. XII 



No. 9. 



JANUARY, 1900. 



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>»/ College 
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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
Annville, Fa. 



CONTENTS 



Editorial ...... 


162 


Pianist Playing at Evening 


165 


Standard Tint and Shade 


165 


The True Source of Human Events 


. 167 


Astronomy and the Bible 


t 7 o 


Copper Deposits in Northern Michigan 


. 172 


Man 's Noblest End . 


174 


Senior Rhetoricals . . . . . 1 


• 17* 


Alumni, ...... 


177 


Locals ....... 


. 17* 


Clioniau Society ..... 


179 


Philokosmian Society .... 


180 


Y. M. C. A 


180 


Exchanges 





WE ARE 



the only Artistic Printers in town. 
We are prepared to print anything;. 
If your stock of Letter Heads, Bill 
Heads, Envelopes, etc., is nearly 
exhausted better send in your order 
now, so as to give us time to do a 
good job for you. 



A. C. M, HESTER, Annville, Pa, 



i 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Vol. XII, JANUARY, 1900. No. 9. 



STAFF; 

Charles E. Snoke, 'do, Editor-iii-Chiei, 
ASSOCIATE : 

Galen D. Light, '99, Cyrus \V. Wathshtki., 01. 

Harry E. Spessaro, or. Hknry H. Baish, '02. 

BUSINESS MANAGERS : 

S. P, Daughertv, 'oi. Chief. H. L. Eichinger, '03, Assistant. 

The College Forum is published monthly hv the Philokoamian Literary Society 
of Lebanon Valley College. 

The College Foritm will be forwarded to all subscribers until nn order is received for 
its discontinuance, and nil arrearages have been paid. Address all business com muni en - 
t > j S. F, Dapgiikkty, Business Manager, Box 184, Annville, Va. 

All mutter intended for the Forum should be submitted to the Editorial Staff not later 
than the 15th of the month preectditig its appearance in the Forum's columns, 

TERMS : — fifty Cents Ter YeaR. Single Copy, 10 Cts. 

Entered at the Post Office at Aunville, Pa., an second-class mail matter. 



TT'OR this issue of the F'okum the present editor-in-chief pens 
his last editorial. With the next number the management 
will have passed from the undergraduate department to a member 
of the Alumni, who it is to be hoped, will be better fitted to direct 
the efforts of his associates. The changs in the Staff will be the 
addition of an extra assistant business manager and two new men 
as associate editors to take vacant places. We pause here to say, 
in favor of Mr. Waughtel who also takes his leave of you with this 
issue, that none of the associate editors worked more earnestly 
and faithfully than he and we are sorry to see his connection with 
the Forum ended. We desire in passing to thank students, alumni, 
and our entire constituency, for your loyal support and patronage, 
for your kind remarks and encouragement, which both induced 
and enabled us to enlarge and transform the magazine as we have 
in the last few numbers. So generously have contributions been 
made that but three articles have been handed us which were not 
written specially for the Forum, and these three were of special 
merit, one being a prize oration. No re-hash of old rhetorical 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



orations has reached us — a thing for which we are glad. Our 
thanks are specially due to Prof. H, E. Enders '97 for an article 
on "Copper Deposits in Northern Michigan, 11 which is continued 
in this number. Prof. Enders is a very loyal alumnus. We 
trust the same support so cordially accorded us may be given our 
successor. And now, we bid you a friendly final farewell. 



XTITHOLIGH foot ball is for this school year a thing of history. 

-I- yet athletics at Lebanon Valley are by no means at a stand- 
still. Coach Gray says that the outlook is good for a winning track 
team. In addition to this there will be shot putting, hammer 
throwing, hurdling, broad jump, high jump, pole vault, etc., in 
some of these more men are needed and it is to be hoped that 
more of our sturdy brawny fellow-students will see the good 
which will come both to them and to the college by supporting 
Mr. Gray. The disposition on the part of too many students is 
to confine themselves too closety to their studies and yet this is very 
unwise. An hour or two each day devoted to athletics under ef- 
ficient direction is no loss of time but a necessity. Baseball is not 
at present receiving the attention, we are sorry to note, which it 
should. There will be some good old players entering here in the 
spring and if the players who are now here of last year's team will 
get to work to practice during the winter there is no reason why 
we should not have a strong winning nine to go upon the diamond 
next spring when the season opens. Games are being scheduled 
with some strong college teams and every enthusiastic player 
should be awake to the situation. For the last few years baseball 
at Lebanon Valley has not received the support which was due it. 
Let this not be said of the coming season. 



TITHE winter term of the present school year opened most aus- 



* piciously on the morning of January 3rd, with an address by 
President Roop on "Living to Purpose." The address was mas- 
terly and was full of thought and advice for every student who 
wishes to succeed — and who does not ? We are glad to welcome 
those who have come among us for the first time. 

We give here an abstract of the opening address : 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



"There is no more emergent and obtrusive fact than the 
difference among men in what we might call will-power, which 
is generally the simple presence of a well founded purpose. 

What but this ( religion aside ) differentiates our living from 
the lower forms of life? A life of instinct is only drifting. Human 
life is a voyage. The lower life about us is the floating of a 
feather compared to the straight rush of an arrow. 

Second, And as among the kinds of life which men live there 
exists this same discrimination. A good sound purpose is the 
only preventive of an aimless and see saw life. Purpose is a rare 
impulsive power and means of progress. Take aim comes just 
before 'fire' and no man is ready to fire for firing does anything 
but mischief ) whose life is not already aimed at something. 

Third, Equally protective is a good honest purpose against 
the light and frivolous life. In such living there is motion but it 
is the restlessness of a fly. It is a buzz and not a flight. 

Fourth, A true purpose, moreover, gives real unity to life. 
We may form such purposes as will give life a meaning, and a 
gleam like a shred of gold between all the separate heads of our 
life events and duties. 

Fifth, And as we are exposed to many influences from with- 
out, we find that living to purpose is our best defense against 
temptation. Would men allure and delude us we can say 'I am 
doing a great work and cannot come down.' Wake up a purpose 
in the heart of every soul now under twenty one years of age, and 
before a decade can pass all the haunts of sin and vice will die of 
inanition. 

Sixth, Many lives are failures for want of concentration ; this 
too a controlling purpose supplies. The men of one idea, who 
are so much praised for effectiveness, are really not men of one 
idea but men of one purpose, to which they subordinate all their 
ideas. 

Seventh, It elevates and intensifies modest endowment. Su- 
preme earnestness exalts ordinary faculties, as education and re- 
fined feeliiur glorify a plain face. Moral purpose may do some- 
thing to supplement natural endowments. 

Eighth, It can persevere ; here is the very center of its power. 
It can scarcely acknowledge defeat. It repairs all manner of falls 
and failures. 



1 65 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Ninth, It can bring others to its aid. Certainty is so good 
and desirable a thing that the uncertain are always ready to ac- 
knowledge it. 

Nothing wins or holds respect more than a solid purpose." 

pianist placing at Evening, 

TO U. H. 

Ten fingers gain with strong, appealing art 
Ten mighty virtues from some bourne on high 
That come as doves, snow-white, and thus they lie 

Forever fixed in a list'ner's heart ! 

No angels at the throne of God take part 

More high than he who 'neath our sunset sky 
Doth form soft healing for the wearied eye, 

Or weave a storm till darkest demons start 
Aloof for safety to their lowest hell. 

Let Reason hold her provinces of mind ; 
Let Speech her sovereignty o'er tongues compel ; 

But give the soul to Music and her kind, 
This player and his peers who echo well 

Impassioned tones of every inner wind. 

Norman Colestock Schlichter, A. B. 

Stanfcarfc Hint anfc Sbafce. 

A little Beam of Sunlight, or Spark of Solar Electricity, some 
would say, travelling at the rate of a hundred and eighty six 
thousand miles a second through the trackless space of the heavens, 
struck by chance — or by Providence — this little crumb of matter 
styled Earth, and heaved a sigh of relief. "I've found a resting 
place at last — ugh! but it was cold out there, 1 ' and it tottered 
from sheer dizziness through our perplexing atmosphere, until it 
struck — of all things for that heavenly little Sunbeam to snuggle 
in — a staring red golf cape draped over a pair of graceful feminine 
shoulders. ' 'This is a very complimentary world, ' ' remarked the 
Sunbeam, spreading itself with self-satisfied complacency over the 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



l66 



folds and fringes of the golf cape. "Why, I am three already. 
Hello One! how do you like it in that deep crease down there? — 
You needn 't look so black . " ' 1 1 feel a litde gloomy, ' ' replied the 
Part of the Beam addressed. "Where art thou, third Third of 
MyselP" called the most brilliant and most loquacious of the 
Parts. "Right here, on this pretty light fringe," it giggled, 
"prettier than either of you ; the lady said that I was her favorite 
color — there is some like nie on her cheek.' ' "Color, what is 
that?" "Oh. a name, a name, everything here has a name. If 
you learn a list of them you are counted quite wise. You see I 
have learned something already — I am near the lady's chin." 
"Ugh," growled the black Third. 

"I am always willing to learn from any source whatever," 
said the brilliant One. "Do you know anything of our where- 
abouts and our future welfare?" "Oh yes! we passed a Kinder- 
garten Supply store a while ago and I recognized our counter- 
parts with their signs out. We each have a name all our own. 
This soft woolly thing we are coloring is a golf cape — the latest 
craze — and chance has split us into our present state of threefold 
brotherhood. You are called "Standard," brother Black there is 
your "SI jade" and I am your charming "Tint." The latest col- 
or schemes in the Kindergarten count ns as the most harmonious 
union of colors. Each Standard Color has his Shade and Tint." 

"Ho! ho! how wise we are growing — let us observe our 
pastures new and report at sundown." And the golf cape con- 
tinued its journey with the sun shaft lighting its folds. 

"I'm growing chilly" growled Shade at last, "we've been 
whisked about this mundane sphere for hours now, and I've seen 
enough to disgust old Father Sol himself." "Oh! no, dear 
brother, not a pessimist from the very day of your birth, I hope!" 
"Pessimist or London mist, this is a foggy place. Now just look 
at that woman ! If I had such big feet as that I'd wear skirts long 
enough to hide them. ' ' "My dear brother, she is merely showing 
her common sense along with her feet — the streets are muddy." 

"But what do you think of that dear Common Sense?" con- 
tinued the Pessimist, glowering at a swiftly moving object in the 
street. "It seems to me that inhabitants of a globe that can't 
travel any faster than nineteen miles a second ought to he satis- 
fied with their lot and not try to imitate our light- speed with their 



I 67 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



whirligigs." "Ab! I see, a bicycle," said Standard, "one of the 
most useful inventious of modern times, affording rapid and easy 
transit, healthful exercise, and enjoyable recreation." "Ojoy! 

0 rapture!" burst in the frivolous Pink at that moment "I have 
the wheeling craze already; it must be perfectly glorious! 

1 have had such a nice time to-day," he continued, "just look at 
those dear children, aren "t they darlings?' 1 "Darling pests — they 
deafen me with their noise." "Come now, don't throw cold 
water on Pink's enthusiasm, he'll tone down after awhile. Child- 
ren are all right if they are properly brought up, and besides, this 
is Christmas, and everyone is a little hilarious.' 1 "Christmas, 
when every one takes his last cent to buy useless nothings for 
people he doesn't care for, and wears holey shoes until next pay 
day." "Christmas is the loveliest season I've ever known' ' gasped 
the Optimist, fairly out of breath with wonder and admiration. 
"The shop windows are prettier than the inter- Mercurial planet, 
and the people seem so jolly." "Christmas is a legitimate time 
for merry-making," said Common Sense, "and a time for special 
manifestation of good will among men." 

"And I'm sure," whispered Pink, "that the mistress of our 
golf capeis in love. " "O horrors !" groaned the Pessimist, "what 
fizzle next?" "Love is a psychic experience, through which we 
all must pass in the process of our development, my dear, so do 
not frown upon it." "Yes indeed, I'm in love with life already," 
cried the enraptured little Pink. Just then the fair hand of the 
mistress of the golf cape whisked the folds from shapely shoulders, 
thrust them into a closet dark, and the colors were no more. 

E. D. 

Cbc Grue Source of Ifouman Events- 
Nothing exists but what, prior to its existence, was character- 
ized by a force in its production, though infinitely small the latter 
may have been. Nature is an immense gallery upon whose walls 
are suspended an infinite variety and number of objects, the re- 
sults of silent forces. When this life-giving force is no longer 
present and it fails to accommodate itself to its environments, then, 



* 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 168 

progress is at nought and life becomes extinct. Not only is this 
force present in Nature but in other existing things, the forms of 
which the mental eye, alone, can perceive. Though their accom- 
plishments can only be observed by the physical eye and not they 
in themselves, nevertheless, their existence is just as true and im- 
portant. Man's actions are but a visible manifestation of his 
thoughts and, similarly, all history. History is as old as the world 
and every moment adds to it, the degree depending upon the ac- 
tivity of the force in its production. Thus America, within the 
last two years, has made history faster than in any previous period. 

The origin of history has been ascribes to different sources. 
Nature has been named and defended, but a retrospection will not 
substantiate the claims made in behalf of it. The centers of greatest 
historic progress have been constantly shifting from laud to laud. 
Greece, with its educational fame, Rome, with its martial glory, 
are no longer the centers of great historic events, yet the gifts of 
Nature are lavished as freely now as in days of yore. Conditions 
are taken for causes and, therefore, arises the discrepancy of this 
theory. Nature offers herself in the negative and man's activity 
unlocks her treasures and adds gems to the world's history. 

Man has been made the sole origin, excluding Nature and 
God. Man is not independent, for Nature is the objective element 
upon which he must work. Man is made subjective and, hence, 
its fault. 

Again, all historic progress has been ascribed to the Divine. 
God is affirmed to be the guide and controller of human progress, 
but, how this is done, has not been made known, i. e. the relation 
of God to human progress has not been asserted. It excludes 
Him from Nature, human knowledge and action. 

The three named theories fail the requirements of a true theory, 
being defective in this, that a single one is taken and the others ex- 
cluded . As we know the properties ofacids and alkalies only by their 
actions upon one another, likewise, is it with the three named 
elements. We must seek a relationship and the question is solved . 

As nature merely furnishes the conditions of historic progress, 
it may be discarded and the relationship of God and man con- 
sidered. This relationship is based upon the fact that God is a 
Spirit and that man has a divine gift, — the soul. Saint John gives 
utterance to these words: — "God is a Spirit: and they that wor- 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



ship him must worship him in spirit and in truth." In Genesis, 
we have the statement that "the Lord God formed man from the 
dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of 
life; and man became a living soul " It is this spirit at work 
from the beginning that has wrought historic progress. From 
the nature of its origin, it is pure and just. It is powerful, for its 
origin is in God, and predominate it will in spite of all the evil 
arrayed against it. It knows no state of dormancy, but manifests 
itself in actions which are the constituents of history. It is with- 
in man rather virtually than actually. Man realizes more of it as 
he grows older. It is a germ of great possibilities and it is in this 
that true greatness may be attained and where one individual may 
excel another. But not only have individuals this spirit but 
nations as well. Nations, from the very dawn of their existence, 
have an individuality possessed with spirit. As the spirit of a 
nation is the reflection of the spirit of its citizens, so is history the 
reflection of the national spirit. It is thus, that all social institu- 
tions are formed, and that the people of a country are striving to 
realize the same national purpose, have common ideas, language 
etcetera. All the events are the products of the national mind. 
All history is lik* 1 . a sphere ; on the surface is a variety ot scene 
and action, but as the center is approached, the scene becomes 
more uniform until at the center exist unity and simplicity, viz., 
spirit. Every reform movement is but an index of the work of 
the spirit in some individual from whom it radiates. The politi- 
cian errs when he simply obtains the majority of the people on his 
side and does not interpret th? spirit of the nation. He may be 
successful for a time, but, the Spirit will predominate, for it is 
rather a qualitative than a quantitative force. The men whom 
nations adore and rever are such as have identified themselves 
with the spirit of the nation. The triumph of the smaller nation 
over the larger must not always be ascribed to man, but, to the 
spirit, which works out the inscrutable purposes of God. As in 
persons, likewise, some nations have a stronger individuality than 
others, and it is this which accounts for their predominance in the 
world's history. We see, therefore, that God works with the 
human spirit as in the realm of nature. 

Galen D. Light, B. S. 



f 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 170 

astronomy anD the 36ible. 

In comparing Astronomy with the Bible, we meet with many 
difficulties. We have to deal with theories rather than with facts ; 
with infidels and pantheists rather than with people of God ; for 
the latter live by faith and accept the statements of the Word of 
God, while the former oppose them, and pronounce them childish, 
absurd and full of supposition. They find their strongest point in 
the account of creation to which we shall direct most of our at- 
tention. However in the face of all these difficulties, we can har- 
monize Astronomy and the Bible as being the result of one and 
the same cause, coming from one and the same spiritual and only 
eternal being. And no matter how bitterly the infidel and the 
pantheist oppose the doctrine of creation as being contradictory to 
Astronomy, we can verify that Astronomy agrees with the first 
and second verses of the Bible, which furnishes one of the strong- 
est points in their argument against it. The first verse of the 
Bible is the most wonderful sentence found in all the literature of 
the world, and of all ages ; it refers to a period of remote and un- 
known antiquity, hidden in the depths of eternal ages. Prov. 8 : 
22-23 *'The Lord posessed me in the beginning of his way, before 
his works of old, I was from everlasting, from the beginning, or 
ever the world was. The Lord by wisdom hath founded the earth, 
by understanding hath he established the heavens." When, is 
the question, in the beginning. They may say God began de- 
veloping the earth 12,000 years ago. It may be millions instead 
of thousands. This only is the beginning of the six days' work, 
the earth however having been created before that time. 

In the six days' work God developed the earth in successive 
and proper steps. The. critic asks why did God take six days to 
a work of this kind, for lie is omnipotent and could have finished 
it in a single moment. We know not why a finite mind can not 
understand the plans of an infinitive being, but it was God's plan 
to take a longer time to his work, as he develops always by cer- 
tain steps. 

When we behold his creation we can not understand how it 
could have been finished in six times twenty four hours, but con- 
clude that it must have taken millions of years to finish a work so 
magnificient and so stupendous. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



The work of the first day seems to be a stumbling block in 
attempting to harmonize Astronomy with the Bible. "On the 
first day God said let there be light and there was light." On 
the fourth day he made the sun, moon and stars. How childish 
the infidel says, and how contradictory, an author advancing such 
arguments, when a child knows that we receive all the light from 
the sun. Such a statement undervalues the mental capacity of 
the author of Genesis, it proves that he was stupid and shallow 
minded. 

Had the author of Genesis been so shallow minded, and had 
he written those words with a hand guided by an uninspired mind, 
he would have been too ignorant at that time to know that the 
light comes from the sun. God created the heaven and the earth, 
but he said let there be light. These forces of light may have 
existed long before this period, but the creator did not see fit and 
proper that they should be manifested. On the fourth day God 
made two great lights, but this does not prove to an ordinary 
mind that this was the first time light was seen upon the earth, 
neither must we loose sight of the fact that the earth as well as 
the rest of the planets possess inherent sources of light, also that 
the sun is only a bearer of light as taught by Astronomy and the 
Bible and not a light by itself any more than the earth, moon or 
planets, which are also self-luminous to some extent, and which 
proves the manifestation of light the third day. We must not 
forget the established theory that the solid central body of the sun 
is of planetary nature, that the sun is surrounded by an immense 
photosphere, and the light and heat we receive is reflected light 
and heat which comes from an immense central sun, making his 
home in an incomprehensible infinity, rocking in the cradle of 
space and known to the creator only. 

When the sun, moon and stars were created we do not know, 
but on the fourth day, after the sky was cleared, the atmosphere 
purified, the sun, moon and stars unveiled their glory in the 
cloudles sky and became visible for the first time. Astronomy 
does not claim to know the date of their creation neither does the 
Bible. 

The following objection may also arise : if the fixed stars 
were created on the fourth day we might not see them yet on ac- 
count of their distance. This very statement would prove to us 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



172 



that they had been created millions of years before the earth, for 
Astronomy teaches us that some are so remote that it requires 
thousands upon thousands of years 'for their light to reach us. 

Astronomy and the Bible strikingly coincide when we hear 
God speak to Job saying : "Where wast thou when I laid the 
foundation of the earth, when the morning stars sang together, 
and all the sons of God shouted for joy." There must have been 
a mighty chorus is space, when the corner stone of the earth was 
laid and the sons of God must have been founded upon a rock and 
nut hopping around in space. This would prove the habitation 
of planets, as well as the pre-existance of the fixed stars. 

D. E. Long, 'oo. 

Copper Bepostts in IRortberu flMceigan. 

{Continued from last number.) 

Fire setting was also practiced, that is, that the rocks adja- 
cent to the copper was caused to crumble by dashing cold water 
on it suddenly, after having heated it very hot. It was then 
scraped away or further pounded with the mauls above mention- 
ed. Then the copper in its turn was pounded off and fashioned 
into various instruments, knives, arrows, the possession then, of 
which must have been a coveted privilege. 

To even fix an approximate era in which the copper mines 
were worked by that strange, prehistoric race unknown, but 
vaguely known by the name Mound Builders, this is as truly 
an unsolved problem as that of the race itself. Of these old pits 
Henry Gillman* says, "These workings are prehistoric. By this 
we mean that while they may well have been contemporary with 
Greek or Asiatic civilization, they were not being worked by the 
aborigines when the first hardy Jesuit missionaries penetrated into 
the regions, but were then already covered with a growth of forest. ' ' 
He thinks they may have been abandoned seven or eight hundred 
years ago, judging from the size of the stumps of trees. Winchell 
thinks that the mines and mound builders were the aborigines dis- 
covered here by the first discoverers, in other words, the Indians. 
Nevertheless, the questious come to us with greater force, "What 
caused these mines to have been abandoned when such large masses 

^Smithsonian Report 1873-1874. 



173 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



of copper were still in sight, and partially removed from their 
ancient beds?" "Was it due to pestilence?" or ' Were they 
abandoned for economic reasons that obtain in our day?" 

While they were lacking in technical education and power- 
ful machinery that makes it possible in our present-day mines to 
descend a mile below the earth's surface, or to daily stamp tons of 
rock into sand, the early miners kftew copper when they saw it, 
and it is said to be a matter of fact, that, with few exceptions, 
wherever one of the old mines was located a modern mine has been 
opened. Severel of the large mines of Ontonagon County have 
been opened on just such shallow pits of centuries ago; of this 
the present "Michigan Mine" is a good example. 

Aside from the stone hammers, interesting finds have been 
made of hardened copper tools and weapons in various pits thru 
the whole Copper Country. There are various collections of these 
relics, corroded and covered with green carbonate of copper; the 
most complete of these are said to be in the Smithsonian and Na- 
tional Museums at Washington, and at the Michigan College of 
Mines, Houghton, Michigan. The ancient workmen possessed 
the secret of hardening copper, now one of the lost arts, but at 
their best the copper tools were sadly inferior to the instruments of 
steel and its alloys employed by those living in modern days. 
Their blades invariably give greater or lesser evidence of being 
hammered out with crude implements. 

Float copper, torn by the action of glaciers from the out- 
croppings, even long before the ancient miners came to the region, 
has been carried many miles and deposited in moraines eastward 
from the Mississippi and northward from the Ohio Rivers. Masses 
of larger or smaller size are constantly being found thruout the 
southern part of the State. One mass of nearly two tons, now in 
the National Museum, found on the banks of the Ontonagon River 
and removed in the early "forties" gave rise to such wild mining 
schemes that men opened mines in sand with as much confidence 
as in trape. Such mining was necessarily short-lived. 

The date of the exploration of the Copper Country by white 
men has been comparatively modern, the first actual miuiug of im- 
portance having begun during the middle of the present century. 
{To be continued. ) 

Howard E. Endkrs, '97. 



the college forum. 



174 



flDan's 1RoblC6t Htm. 

Written in the splendor of sunlight; graven in the mellowness 
of moonlight; emblazoned on the azure sky by the marvels of 
heavenly systems, every star a character, and every constellation 
a sentence; unfolded on every waive of the unfathomable and ever 
changeful ocean ; inscribed upon every verdant field and golden 
harvest; traced upon every flower and leaf; whispered by every 
breeze that sways the undulating prairie, or makes the mighty 
forest vocal ; emphasized by mountain cataract ; murmured by 
babbling brooklet; mirrored in the lake and lakelet, is Heaven's 
warmest, never ceasing invitation: "O Son of Man, study — all 
Nature, God's own book, is before thee ; take up read : its every 
lesson will gladden thy heart and strengthen thy soul.'' 

Study is the covenant between man and immortality, the bond 
between the present and the hereafter, the link between time and 
eternity. It becomes thesceptered king better than jew r eled crown, 
the armored soldier better than gilded panoply. 

Hence Shakespeare says ; 
"Alas, how should you govern any kingdom. 
That know not . . . how to study for the people's welfare." 

Bradley in his story of the Goths, tells us that, "it was the 
king Theodoric's special study so to apportion the taxes that the 
burden fell as equally as possible." 

It is the statesman's inspiration, the warrior's security, the 
hope of the toiler, the incentive of the tried and the tempted. 

If a man has great talents, study will improve them; if he 
have but moderate abilities, study will largely make up for their 
deficiency. 

The sons of men, study makes like unto the up-growing cedars 
of Libanus, and the daughters thereof like unto the polished cor- 
ners of the temple.' It is that God-sent, heaven -blessed spirit 
which to eager and ambitious youth conveys the message from above. 
Be not content. Contentment means inaction ; 

The growing soul aches in its upward quest. 
Satiety is twin to satisfaction ; 

All great achievements spring from life's unrest. 

# # * # # * * 

Were man contented with his lot forever, 

He had not sought strange seas with sails unfurled, 

And the vast wonder of our shores had never 
Dawned on the gaze of an admiring world. 



175 



the collkge; forum. 



Through study, the student recognizes the poverty of ignor- 
ance and the wealth of learning. The pursuit of knowledge unites 
and persuades, nay, with sweet resistless power, forces him to look 
upward, convicing him that if he looked down, his shoulders 
stoop; that, if his thoughts he downward, his character bends; 
and that it is only when he holds his head up, his body becomes 
erect, and only when his thoughts go upward, his life becomes 
upright . 

The pursuit of knowledge implies that tender yet firm disci- 
pline, which guards our homes and guides our youth; which 
shows itself not only in words, but in all the circumstances of 
action, It is like an under agent of Providence, directing us in 
all the ordinary concerns of life. More shining qualities are there, 
indeed, than discipline, but none more useful, for it is discipline 
which imparts value to all the rest, which sets them at work in 
their proper times and places, and turns them to the advantage of 
their fortunate possessor. Without it learning is pedantry and 
wit impertinence; virtue itself appears in the garb of weakness; 
the best parts qualify a man only to be more sprightly in errors 
and active in his own undoing. 

No: there is no discipline without industry, no industry 
without study, no success without incessant study. He who, 
from day to day, recognizes what he has not yet, and from month 
to month, to what he has attained, may be said to love to learn. 

Love of learning is the characteristic of true manhood ; and 
true manhood, whether found in the humble shop of the artisan, 
in the stately hall of the legislator, or the gdded palace of the 
monarch, ever enlists respect, for its mouth never ceases to speak 
of wisdom, and its heart never fails to muse of understanding. 

flive us men, cries out the state; give us men to guide our 
families, to lead our armies, to inspire our legislatures! 

"Out of every youth that cometh unto me and gathereth 
wisdom at my feet," quoth the good angel of study, U I make a 
man," a man in truth, of whom may well and truly be predicated 
the immortal lines of the deathless bard of Avon : 

The elements so mixed in him, that Nature might stand up 

And say to all the world, this was a man! 

President Roop. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 176 



Senior IRbetoricale. 



Many friends of the Senior Class were present in the College 
Chapel on Saturday evening, December 16, and Monday evening, 
December 18 , to enjoy the rhetorical exercises. 

The subjects of the orations were well selected and their ren- 
dition reflected credit on the class. 

The programs follow, 



First Division. 




MARCH. 




INVOCATION. 




"Environment," 


Rene D. Burtner. 


"Revelators of Character," 


Nellie Burlington. 


"Trusts," 


Fred Weiss Light. 


PIANO SOLO-Rhapsodie No. 12. 


Lis-/. 


Carrie E. Fretz. 




"Culture of the Memory," 


David E. Long. 


"The Truth." 


Seth Light. 


VOCAL SOLO— Cradle Song, 


Taubert. 


Reba Lehman. 




"Logic," 


Charles E. Snoke. 


"Rubyat,"— Omar Kyain, 


Enid Daniel. 


PIANO SOLO— Staccato Etude, 


Golschalk. 


Charles OKI ham. 




"The Telescope of the Mind," 


Alviu E. Shroyer. 


"The True Mission of America," 


Lizzie Kreider. 


"The Evils of Intemperence," 


G. M. Snoke. 


PIANO DUET— Gallop Brilliant, 


Behr. 


Susie Moyer, Alma Engle. 


Second Division" 




MARCH. " 




INVOCATION. 




"The People We Meet," 


C Madie Burtner. 


"The History of Chemistry," 


Ross Nissley. 


VOCAL SOLO-I Fear no Foe, 


Piasuti. 


Hairy Raab. 




"Mustc of the Spheres," Anna Elizabeth Kreider. 


"The Journey of the Stars," 


Ralph D. Reider. 


"Through the Object Glass," 


Reba F. Lehman. 


PIANO SOLO— Polonaise, 


Tsc/t a ikoivsk i-L iszt. 


Arabella Batdorf. 





"The Martyr of the Nineteenth Century," 

Clyde Saylor. 
"The Worth of a New Condition," 

Nora Elizabeth Spayd. 



177 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



VOCAL SOLO— Irma, Klein. 

LilKe Kreider. 
"The Prospects of the Negro," 

Harry Edgar Spessaod. 
"The World's Greatest Battle," Adam K. Weir. 

PIANO DUET — L'Trrisistible, Kretnstr. 
H. Oldham, Elizabeth Stehman. 

alumni* 



'8o 

Hon. Simon P. Light, one of Lebanon's most prominent 
lawyers lias been unanimously elected Honorary Orator for the 
Philokosmian Literary Society in May. 

'95 

U. H. Hershey, who is studying music in New York City 
was visiting in Annville during his holiday vacation. Urban 
finds quite an attraction here. 

'97 

Messrs Adam A. and Geo. S. Ulrieh the former a student in 
Yale Law School, the latter in Jefferson Medical College, spent 
their Christmas vacation in Annville. 

Rev Charles B. Wingert will graduate from Union Biblical 
Seminary in May, 

Howard Enders, Professor of Natural Science in the High 
School, Iron Mountain, Michigan assistant on the Geological 
Survey of that state, has contributed some magnificient gealogical 
specimens to the College Museum lately. This is loyalty at work. 

'98 

Prof. O. P. DeWitt is the successful principal of the Rovers- 
ford public schools. Mr. De Witt's friends here remember him as 
the Editor-in-Chief under whose direction the Forum was trans- 
formed into a much better magazine than it had been. 

Rev. J. W. Yohe has closed a very successful revival recently 
in his church at York, Pa. 

'99 

Galen D. Light who is taking studies at the College has been 
elected Editor-in-Chief of the Forum. 



the college forum. 



locale. 



The College Quartette gave two concerts in Duncannon on 
Friday and Saturday evenings, January 5th and 6th, in the U. B. 
church. The audiences were large and appreciative. 

Mr. Harry Raub, ot Dallastown, a student in the conservatory, 
has left College to assist his Father in business. 

President Roop will move into Morris E. Brightbill's new 
house on College Avenue, in the Spring. 

Miss Helen Shank, of Kittaning, Pa. t spent her vacation with 
friends at Eliza bethtown, Lancaster Co., Pa. 

Mr. Paul P. Smith accompanied W. C. Arnold to his home 
at York where he spent his holiday vacation. 

Dr. Roop atteuded the Historical Society's Banquet held at 
Lebanon, December 'qij. 

Mr. Artie Miller was visited by his brother Jerome of Har- 
risburg over Sunday January 14th. 

A very successful sociable was held at the Ladies 1 Hall, Sat- 
urday evening, January 13, for the reception of new students by 
the College Christian organizations. The College Quartette ren- 
dered choice music. The committee deserve great praise and 
commendation for their efficient management. 

Dr. Roop preached in the U. B. church at Mt. Joy on Sunday 
morning, January 14. He also addressed a men's meeting at that 
t place. 

Mr. C. E, Snoke 'oo preached for Rev. Braine, in Trinity U. 
B. church, Lebanon, Wednesday evening, January 3rd. 

Christian L. Heisy of Rheems, Lancaster Co., was the guest 
of H. H. Baish over Sunday. 

Rev. Dr. Allbright of Shamokin, Pa., conducted Chapel ex- 
ercises Tuesday morning i6iust. 

Mr. Karnig Koomyoomyian '01 spent the holidays with Mr. 
Winey at Richfield, Pa. During his stay at that place he gave 
five lectures on the manners, customs and institutions of his country. 



179 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Miss Luckman of York, Miss Stabler of Freedomsburg and 
Mr. Wmey of Richfield, Pa., are some of the new faces seen for 
the first time at L. V. C. The Forum extends a hearty welcome 
to the new students. 

Miss Bessie Dengler of Pottsville, Pa., has lately been visit- 
ing her friend Miss Edna Groff, a student in the Conservatory - 

At a meeting of the Trustees of the College on January r6th 
it was unanimously decided to add a north wing to North College, 
which is to be finished by September. It was also agreed that 
the Conservatory would be finished by May 15th. 

The library of the Philokosmian Society has lately been re- 
catalogued, and 60 new volumes have been added to it. 

Clionian, 

The Clio girls may well feel proud of their Society at present, 
the past term was the best one for many years, and we are trying 
to make this term equally so, even better if possible. 

The officers for the term are 

President Lillian G. Kreider, 'oo; Vice President Sue S. 
Mover, '00; Recording Secretary Reba F. Lehman, '00; Critic 
Enid Daniel, "oo; Corresponding Secretary Nellie Bumngtoii, '00; 
Editress Anna E. Kreider, '00. 

Arrangements are being made for a Joint session with the P. 
L- S., and we foretell a good time. At our last joint session with 
our Phjlo brothers we spent the evening with Shakespeare and 
Mendel lsohn it has not been decided who we shall study at the 
next session but the mere saying that we shall spend it with the P. 
L. S. is enough to insure a good program. 

We were very glad to welcome Miss Ruth Brasselmann, into 
our midst, it took her some time to decide whether she should join 
or not, but we are pleased that she has decided to put her shoulder 
to our literary wheel and move onward, with our motto "Virtute 
et Fide" ever before us. 

Lillian G. Kreider, '00. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



[ No 



PbUofeoemian, 

The annual election of the Philo society was held on Friday 
evening, January 5. 

The Forum will fulfill the demands of its patrons better than 
ever before. 

Instead of having orations delivered by members of the society, 
as is customary on the occasion of the anniversary, the society has 
decided to substitute a public debate. This done with the idea of 
makiug the anniversary exercises more interesting and at the same 
time giving the speakers an opportunity for exhibition of skill in 
oratory. The debaters are Messrs W. O. Roop and O. G. Myers, 
with W. H. Kurd as alternative and Messrs R. R. Butterwick and 
C- E. Snoke with C. W. Waughtel as alternative. 

Hon. Simon P. Light who was graduated in the class of 18S0, 
and who is now a member of the Lebanon County bar has been 
unanimously elected by the society as Ex- Philo orator. The an- 
niversary takes place on May 4. 

J. W. ESBENSHADE, '03. 

IP. nix <l a. 

The opening of the new term brings bright prospects for in- 
creased interest in our Y. M. C. A. work. The first devotional 
meeting was held January 7th. 

There was an unusual attendance and renewed interest is a 
prevailing feature. To the new students, we bid you a hearty 
welcome to enlist in our ranks to help ameliorate the character of 
of student-life by carrying on this blessed work which God has 
intrusted to the minds and hearts of the young men of the present 
day. "Say not ye, there are yet four months, and then conieth 
harvest ? Behold, I say unto you, lift up your eyes, and look on 
the field ; for they are white alreadj? with harvest." Come, labor 
with us that we may be a blessing one to the other.. 

"All things are in fate, yet all things are not decided by fate." 



[Si 



THE COLLEGE I'URUM. 



Exchanges. 



We welcome the following exchanges for December : 

Juniata Echo, Otterbcin Oregis, The Lesbian Herald, The 
Phoenix, The College Review, Gates Index, Merccrsburg Monthly, 
Western Maryland College Monthly, The Red and the Blue, The 
Mirrior, The Ursinus College Monthly, Pennington Seminary Re- 
view. 

The Mirror is to be commended for its spicy editorials, 
while the general value, both literary and artistically, exceed many 
college papers. 

We welcome The Red and Blue and are pleased to class it 
among the very foremost of our college exchanges. The true 
poetry that is here and there dispersed among the rich articles of 
thought, give them beauty, and there is a fascination which leads 
the reader into the thorough enjoyment of every subject. 

We are also pleased to welcome the Pennington Seminary 
Review. We trust it will continue to be with us and keep its 
standard with our leading magazines- 
Havens — "My chum is smarter than yours; he writes 
poetry . ' ' 

McCoy — "Hm, my chum's twice as smart as that; he 
don't."— Ex. 

Miss McCullough — "It must have taken Daniel Webster a 
long time to compile the dictionary. Don't you think so ?" 
Miss Ilegden — ' 1 Daniel ? You mean Noah, don't you ?' ' 
Miss M. — "Now don't be silly ; you know as well as I do 
that Noah built the ark. "— Ex. 

While Moses was not a college man, 

And never played football, 
In rushes he was said to be 

The first one of them all. — Ex, 

Employer — You say that your habits are all correct ? 
Allen — Yes, sir. 

Employer (after a moment's pause) — Do you drink ? 

Allen (absent-mindedly ) — Thanks ! Don't care if I do. — Ex. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



182 



Dowries — So you are just back from the Klondike, eh ? 
What did you do there ? 

Waggoner — Started a paper. 
Dowries — What was the name of it ? 

Waggoner — A subscription paper to get back home again. 

— Ex. 

"Mother, what does trans-Atlantic mean?" 

"Across the Atlantic. Don't bother me." 

"Does 'trans' always mean across?" 

"Yes. If you disturb me again I will send you to bed." 

"Well, then, doesn't transparent mean across parent?" — Ex. 



If you want to Buy a Hat Might, and j 
Right Hat, or anything in 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS, 

<l°-™ Erb & Craumer, 

8th au-i Cumberland st.s. 
LEBANON, ... PA. 



L. ¥. C. QUARTETTE 

COMPOSED OF 

11. E. Spessard, 

S. D. Kaufman, 

W. 5. Roup, 

C. R. Engle, 
H. L. Eichinger, Elocutionist, 

a strong concert company well pre- 
pared to give first class entertain- 
ments. 

*»? Y. M. C, A., 

C. E. SOCIETY, 
CHURCH 

wishing a good entertainment can- 
not do hctter than to engage the 
L, V. C. yuartetle. 

For terms, dates, etc., address the 
manager, 

r|. L, Eichinger, 
flnnville, p a . 



H.S. WObf% 

• — DEALER IN— 

Green Groceries 

and Confections. 

Restaurant in connection. 



Stephen Hubertis 

1125 and 1127 North Third St., 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Blank Book Manufacturer 

and JOB BOOK BINDER. 



k'nling\ 
Numbering, 



Wire 
Stitching. 



WEAVER ORGAN & PIANO 
COMPANY, 

MANL'FACTrREItS 

YORK, PA. 

U. S. A. 

Established 1870 
Incorporated 1882 




Capital, . . . 
Surplus, . . . . 
Annual Business, 



$120,000.00 
80,000.00 
210,000.00 



Ample experience, ample capital and 
ample facilities to kr.cw the wants 
of the people and supply them. 



Harry Light 

Books anb 
Stationery 



22 East Main Street, 
Annville, Pa. 

New, second-hand and shelf worn 

COLLEGE TEXT 
BOOKS. 

STATIONERY, 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES. 

Students' Supplies a Specialty. 



West End Store J 

General- — =s 

Merchandise 

Shoes and Gent's Furnishing Goods 
a Specialty. 

.^4-136 West Main Street, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



i860 1SS5 

J. HENRY MILLER, 

General Insurance Agent, 

S. W. Cor. 8th and Willow, 
LEBANON, PA. 

A IX COMPANIES FIRST— CLASS. 

F. B. MARSHALL, M, D 
No. 34 East Main street, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



KSTAHUSHKD 18^1. 



Theo Leonard! & Son 

LITHOGRAPHERS, 

5th and Liberty Sts., PHIL A. 

Diplomas and Certificates of 
flembership. 
Commercial Work our Specialty. 



SHENK & KINPORTS. 

ANNVILLE, PA, 

Defers In pry GOOtlS, NOtiODS, 
and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suiting** we make r. specialty. 
I I . in, umde, Ingrain ntlfi Brussels Cni jttls 
Von bttj Cheaper from us tlinii n-nay I nun 
home, and have a large stock to select from 



J. G. GARMAN, 

B*A*R*B*E*R 

Livery Attached. K. Main St. 

JOSEPH MILLER, 

Furniture & Undertaking:. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
InZ. C. IniOOLF, 

[Notions, Groceries, Etc. 

62 East Main St. 



Sheffey's Furniture Store, 



Cor. Main and 

White Oak Street. 
Undertaking A Specialty- 



JOS. A. SMITH, 

Hardware, Plain, . . . 

Stamped & Japanned Ware. 

ANNVILLE, - - PA. 

J. S. KENDIG, 

Next Door to Hotel Eagle. 



Harry Zimmerman, D. D. S., 

Dental IRooms, 

72 W. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



The Northwestern Mutual Life 
Insurance Co., of Milwaukee, Wis. 

R A MAULFAIR. Gen. Agt.. 

ANUVII.l.E, }"A, 

All the latest and best policies issued. 

H . SHHUD, 

■ — DEALER IN — • 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY, 

Wholesale ond Retail Dealer in 
FINE AND 
CANDIES 3* FRUITS. 

Families supplied with OYSTERS. 



Eastman Business College 

Has in its half century of work de- 
veloped the capacity of thousands in- 
to well-trained men. capable to fill 
every depa rtmen t of a busi ness enreer. 
Known everywhere for the thorough- 
ness of the prepnrHtion given in the 
leasL time at the smallest expense. 



The System of Teaching 

Is baised on actual daily experience 
in every branch of business, includ- 
ing Merchandising, Bookkeeping, 
Banking, Commercial Law, Penman- 
ship, Correspondence, Arithmetic. 
Telegraphy, Stenography, Typc-writ- 




Youn* Men Trained 

To be all-round business men: — or 
thev innv t ike up a special brunch of 
business" and be THOKOrGH in that. 

No better illustration of the value of 
B business education can he offered 
than the success of those who haw 
L:ri' lnnteJ from Kaslmnn College. 

By the old way, training for business 
was acquired through years nf ap- 
prenticeship, but the successful man 
of today is the one who enters the 
field prepared for the wurk he is to do 
by the new and shorter methods of 
Kastman College, the model business 
school. 



A Tliorouffh Business Man 

Is the description of the man who 
becomes m i ec«W ful, is known hjk1 has 
the confidence of the community. 



BUSINESS HOUSES supplied with 
competent assistants, Situations se- 
cured without charge, for all gradu- 
ates of the Business and Short-hand 
Courses, an invaluable feature to many 
young people. Open all the year. 
Time short. Terms reasonable. Ad- 
dress as above. 



Translations 

Literal Interlinear, 
67 Volumes. 

Dictionaries 

German, French, 
Italian, Spanish, 
Latin and Greek. 



Arthur hjinds & Co., 

4 Cooper Institute, New York. 



WERNER'S 
MAGAZINE 

Is full of valuable material . written 
by the -world's specialists, on 

Song, Speech, the Delsarte System, 
Physical Culture, Oratory, Elo- 
cution, Extemporaneous 
Speaking and Kindred 
Subjects. 

Its Recitation and Declamation de- 
partment is full of the newest and best 

Recitations, Declamations, Enter- 
tainments, Monologues, Panto- 
mimes, Drills, Plays, Lesson- 
Talks, Suggestive Pro- 
grams and Chats. 



A. C. ZIMMERMAN, 

DBAI,ER IN 

Carpets, Rugs, 
Oil Cloths, 

758 Cumberland Street, 
LEBANON, PA, 

ANYTHING YOU WANT IN 

Cameras, lXX' Tbic 

L. G. HARPEL, 

At McGowan's Drug Store, 

S. W. Cor. 7th and Cumb. St.. 

LEBANON, PA. 



S. M . SHENK'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

Fresh Bread, Cakes and Rolls. 

One door West Penna. House, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



Stephen Lane Folger, 

Manufacturing Jeweler, 

Club, College and Fraterntty 
Emblems, Watches, Diamonds 
and J ewelry. 



198 Broadway, NEW YORK. 

Specint Designs, ulso KsVinifites Kiimi>iK-il. 

RISE & GATES, 

Photo Artists 

152 N. Eighth Street. 

LEBANON, PA. 

Special Inducements to Students. 

Gut Hat® 
Clothing Co., 

OPERA HOUSE BLOCK 

LEBANON, PA. 

The One Price Men's and Boy's 

Clothier and Furnisher. 



New Commonwealth 

Sf-|OE STORE. 

Makes it a special" object" to stu- 
dents in the way of a liberal discount 
to buy their SHOES of them. 

753 Cumb. St. LEBANON, PA. 

THOMAS H. ELLIOTT, 

All Kinds ofiShoe repairing. 
New work, made to order. 



WHY NOT BUY the ' Temberger a™ 

Finest ORGAN Made *>™™ ists *«> Ptmirmaciste, 

9th cumb. sts.. LEBANON, PA. 




Especially when you can get it at the 
snine price as other organs are sold for. 
Intending purchasers should send to us 
for catalogue, etc. We arc also general 
agents for the KRAKAUER PIANO for 
Eastern Pennsylvania. Over 200 of these 
Pianos in use in the city of Lebanon 
alone. It is the finest and best piano 
made, and prices very reasonable. Pianos 
as low as $150. Catalogues, etc., free. 

MILLER ORGAN CO., Lebanon 

ARE YOU getting ready 

to be /HARRIED? 

If so, you will soon be looking around 
for furniture. Perhaps you are already 
married, and would like some new furni- 
ture to brighten up your home ? A par- 
lor suite, bed room set, book case, odd 
chairs, dresser, etc. Perhaps an office 
desk. You can buy the world famous 
high grade Grand Rapids furniture direct 
from the factory and thereby save the 
retailers' profit. A dollar saved is two 
dollars earned. Scud for catalogue. 

Grand Rapids Furniture Company, 
GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Wm, Kiebler, 

Shaving and Hair Cutting, 

Eagle Motel Harbor Shop. ANNVIU.K. J'a 



Our claim in nil we do : 

gUALITY— Of first importance— ACCURACY 



JACOB SARGENT, 

— FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 



tS and 20 W. Main St., ANNVILLE. 



SO YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE. 




TS 



TRADE MARKS. 
DEStCNSp 
COPYRIGHTS Afl. 

Anyone senoinp a iMial) and description may 

qulcltlraeci'rf'iln, ir'in, nliratier an IiitimiIIiti la 
pnihiJilr I'l.i? '" ■■ •■"'I'?. «'<")iinitiTiicaftrtna «n >.-tir 
t*ritii]i'ii!n( !al, OW'^l nftv.nry f< ir "i-ciirint? putcnta 
In America. VV'j hftvc a Wonlilimton ofTirp. 

Patenta tnken through Munn £ Co. recelra 
■puclnl notice hi t>.o 

SCIENTIFIC A^f.R1GA» f 

ticantlfullr lllnsrrnted, Innie^t. Wronlntluii of 
anv sclent I tic J"iirUHl, vucklj , t<;rnisH.(XI ft jeari 
|1.-VIbix niontlis. Hpecluien copies and tULMQ 
II'.kiK on Fatknto sent free Addreai 

MUNN & CO,, 

301 lirondwny, New York. 



H. H, Kreidei 
J110. K. Herr 



Kreider & Co„ 

de.alu.rs rn all kinds of 
Telephone Connection. Annville. Pa 



Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds, Salt, Feed. 

Office: R;i ilroml Ht . . Near Depot. 



F. W. FROST. 

Book Binder and Blank Book 
Manufacturer, 

7S3 Cumberland St., LEBANON, PA. 

Rensselaer \ 

Polytechnic^ 
Nfc*. Institute, 

X Troy, N,Y. 

I/}csaleiamin»[i<inK riroridad for. Send InraCatnlofua, 

Advertise in the Forum 



iiiiMiiiiiiHiimHiHiiiiiiiifMjiiiMi inmiirminwm tMiiniiiiiiiiiuiiiuiiimmiii^ 

| Lebanon Valley College, | 

1 ANNVILLE, PA. 1 



This College, founded in t866 and chartered with full univer- 5 

S sity privileges by our State Legislature in 1867, stands for charac- 3 

3 ter, nigh scholarship and noble manhoodand womanhood. Here 5 

3 choice young people from various states come into competition and 3 

3 fellowship with one another, and with teachers of high character, 5 

3 sound learning and progressive methods and ideas, 

3 E§ 

I The College Department | 

\ Offers three full four year courses of study and provides as varied S 

= and thorough learning and excellent results in mental discipline 3 

3 and culture as are to be gained anywhere in the state. The regular 3 

3 departments of instruction include Philosophy, embracing Mental, = 

3 Moral and Pedagogical Science; Ancient Languages (Latin and = 

3 Greek); Mathematics; English Language and Literature ; History 5 

3 and Political Science ; Modern Languages (German and French); 3 

3 English Bible : Physical Culture ; Elocution. 

I The Academic Department | 

3 Covers the work of the standard High and Normal Schools and 3 

3 Academies and prepares for College, Teaching and Business. 

I The Conservatory of Music § 

3 Offers complete courses in Pianoforte, Voice, Organ, Harmony, = 

3 etc., after methods of the foremost European Conservatories. The = 

3 various branches of art are also taught. 3 

| ADVANTAGES | 

Thoroughness, Cheapness, Completeness, Commodious Build- 5 

s ings and a fine campus for Athletic purposes. 

= The personal attention given each student secures to him a 5 

3 splendid education under the most stimulating influences. 

5 Winter Term begins January 2, 1900; Spring Term, March 27. = 
= For further information, address ! 

President h|ervin U, Rpop, Pf). D, t 

I ANNVILLE, PA. | 

3 3 

fitimimiiiift iitiiiiiiiimiffr ititiiiiiiiii>iiii»iiiiiiiiiiiiiiMHtiiiiiiiiiiiiiff?fMiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimif? 



Vol. XII. 



No. 10. 



FEBRUARY, 1900. 



U College U 
% forum jjl 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
Annvillc, Pa. 



CONTENTS 







A Spirit of Peace 


184 


Kentucky Situation • 




uur oreai iNauon . 


T S > 


Die Veilchen . 


IO / 


insinuates oi wasnington 


1 80 


i_oi>pcr uepoijits m i^iui mem ivin_iii^<Aii 


t 0 r 


X4CI.LUIC • •■>>• 




Junior Rhetorical . 


194 


Banquet . 


195 


Caught on a Fly 


197 


Philo Notes ,\" 


; 5 ' 198 


Kalo Notes .... 


198 


Y. M. C. A. 


199 


Conservatory of Music 


200 


Alumni et Alumnae 


200 


Locals . 


201 


Exchanges .... 


202 



WE ARE^^- # 

the only Artistic Printers in town. 
We are prepared to print anything. 
If your stock of Letter Heads, Bill 
Heads, Envelopes, etc., is nearly 
exhausted better send in your order 
now, so as to give us time to do a 
good job for you. 




A. C. M. HEESTER, Annville, Pa, 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Vol. XII. FEBRUARY, 1900. No. 10. 



STAFF; 

Galen li. Luvht, 'co, Hditor-iii-Chtef. 
ASSOCIATE ; 

IIakkv K. Spessaku, 'oo. At i k !• i . C. T. Sumner, 'w. 

Hexry H, U.\isir, 02, Cuari.es W. Christmas-, '03. 

BUSINESS MANAGERS : 
9, P. D,-\L*fr Jt KRT Y, '01, chief. 
H. L. KicniNo er, '03, Assistant. C. Arnold, '03, Assistant. 

The College i'lmra in jxiblislied monthly by the Philokcstnian t.itcraiy Society 
of I.ebanon Valley College. 

The Colljeuk Fokum will be forwarded to all subscribers until an order is received for 
ils di.sL-ouliuLuince. and all arrearages have been paid. Address all business commimicn- ! 
tions lo S. F, l)An;iii-:RTV, Business Manager, Box 184. Ann villi-, l a. 

All matter intended fr.r the Fcmtriu should be submitted to the Editorial Staff not later 
than tht 151I1 of.thc month prcOMding its appearance In the FoRUM'Scolnmns. 

TERMS ;--EIl- I V CBNTS PEK YEAH. SINGLE COPYj 10 CTS. 

Entered at the Post Office at Anuville, l a., as si cond-cla.^s mail mutter. 



EDITORIAL. 

fog The Frontispiece presents to the readers of 

the Fokum its editorial staff and business 
frontispiece, managers, the class relationship of whom 
can be seen above. It will be noticed that 
there are only three new faces in Forum circles. While there 
comes to us somewhat of a feeling of pride, in that, that we have ' 
been honored by an election to these positions, yet, this is accom- . 
panied with a keen discernment of the responsibility which rests 
upon us— a responsibility, however, which must not entirely be 
placed upon the staff but, as well, upon the student body whose 
duty it is to contribute articles and news in general. May we 
suggest that those, who write for the Forum, choose subjects suit- 
able for a college paper and treated in the best possible manner; 
and, may these productions be. handed to us carefully written, 
punctuated, and paragraphed. This will save time for us and, at 
the same time, will avoid misunderstandings. We desire suggest- 
ions from our readers and will adopt them, provided, we deem 
Lhem to contribute to the betterment of the paper. We thank 



i84 THE COLLEGE FORUM. 

the students and friends for their prompt response to the demands 
made upon them for the present number and earnestly hope that 
such may continue to be the case. 

* * * 

ft <nni H t ^ liat war is somethin g terrible, is declared 

* by every one who has engaged in it, or who 

Of P>CBC£. has in any way experienced its deadly rav- 
ages. This is admitted and believed by all 
thoughtful people whether they have had actual experience in 
war on not. War is not only terrible in its nature, but, it is un- 
certain in its results : and, generally, we may say, its treacherous 
and withering hand sweeps farther and wider than is expected. 

It must be remembered, too, that war is losing none of its 
hideousness with the passage of time. It has ever been destruct- 
ive in the past ; it is more destructive now, with the more formid- 
able weapons in use. In the past, no one has been able to proph- 
esy with any degree of accuracy, what would be the end or extent 
of a war begun. Who, at the present time, with the world's 
population vastly increased, with the world's commerce infinitely 
more extensive and competitive, with the interests of the nations 
more wide-spread, and the interests of one nation becoming the 
interests of every other nation, who, we say, would venture to 
predict the end of an international conflict ? Who would dare to 
say, dogmatically, that even a conflict, small when entered into, 
would not lead to extended complications and untold bloodshed ? 
Certainly no one would attempt anything more than a vague con- 
jecture in either of these instances. 

For these reasons, along with many others, we must conclude 
that there are few things which the world stands more in need of 
to-day, than the existence of an all-pervading spirit of peace. A 
universal spirit of peace is the only thing that will insure a con- 
tinued state of peace Before we can rest satisfied that the peace 
of the world is insured against the interruptions of gigantic con- 
flicts, there must be that love of peace, that appreciation of the 
blessings of peace, which will not only create a dislike for war, 
but, consummate dread of it; which will look upon war as a 
monster and, with but the rarest exceptions, as a fool-hardy resort. 

We give a little room for exceptions for the reason that there 
may arise, even at this late day, instances in which a resort to 
arms is justifiable. So long as there are individuals in every 



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nation, whom it is right to send the police after, so long as there 
are people in the world, who will stir up insurrection for selfish 
ends, in direct violation of just laws, so long as there nations 
which make it their business to render subjects to a system of 
bondage and extortion, so long, may there arise instances in which 
it is right to resort to arms. But, if the hearts of men are per- 
vaded by a full appreciation and love of peace, war will be con- 
fined to its proper sphere. It will be resorted to only when 
nothing else is effective; when all promoters of justice agree that 
it will remove more misery than it will bring, or save more life 
than it will sacrifice. 

War, entered into under such conditions, will end as soon as 
the evil, it was instituted to remove, has been crushed. Neither 
will there be the danger that other nations, looking on, will spring 
up and say — "Our honor has been trampled upon," for, all will 
look upon the war as a just one. We repeat, therefore, that it is 
the duty of every christian person to do all in his power to pro- 
mote a spirit of peace. ■ 

1kf»tl tlirhV) 11 is to ^ e ho P ed thaL the disgraceful pro- 

ceedings, in Kentucky, will soon end. Al- 
SttlinttOll. ready too long, this nation has been com- 
pelled to blush with shame at the political 
trickery and lawlessness that has been carried on in that State. It 
seems that there have been mistakes made on both sides and we are 
not inclined to pass an opinion here, but surely, there is a better way 
to settle the difficulty than by shooting each other. Kentucky is 
not the only State in which there is political fraud. Pennsylva- 
nia, the State of which we are proud to be natives, has not always 
been free from political corruption, yet. in the end, we believe that 
right will prevail and usually settle our difficulties at the ballot 
box. 



0uv Great IRation. 



Between the sixty-seventh and the one hundred and twenty- 
seventh meridian of longitude west from Greenwich, and the 
twenty-ninth and forty-ninth parallel of north latitude, there ex- 
tends a strip of country which is inhabited by a remarkable peo- 



i86 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



pie. This country stretches through the heart of the North Tem- 
perate zone, making the climatic conditions all that could be 
desired. Rectangular in shape, it forms, in its physical outline, 
a compact structure. Surrounded, for the larger part, by the 
ocean and ramified by a network of waterways, it is naturally 
adapted for commercial transactions. Dotted with bills and 
mountains, whose bosoms are filled with an inexhaustible supply 
of coal and iron, it freely yields the raw materials which have given 
rise to the greatest manufacturing enterprises in the world. Its 
valleys and lowlands, covered with a rich soil, at once make it a 
fertile field for agricultural pursuits. This country is indeed nat- 
urally great and, through good fortune, is inhabited by a nation 
equally as great. 

This nation is the most cosmopolitan and yet, the most singu- 
lar in existence. There is no beautiful legend which traces its 
existence and birth back to a certain unitary family, but it is com- 
posed of individuals, whose ancestors represent almost any and 
every civilized nation on the globe. The European nations have 
poured their thousands upon this land. These various elements, 
by a process of composition, have been united and, today, make 
up the most energetic and versatile nation on the earth. These 
different conditions of the people, who, in the main have entered 
this land for civil and religious freedom, have been welded to 
gether most auspiciously, and, out of the mixture, has been formed 
a people with a distinct national spirit. Equality of rights and 
freedom to all, is the keynote to which all give assent. Favorit- 
ism to none and a fair chance to all, is their belief. 

This nation is a great one in the establishment and mainte- 
nance of its government. Think of a nation — seventy millions of 
people — ruling itself by a system of government in which the 
functions of government are all present and equitably distributed 
and discharged. The government, we possess, is more powerful 
to execute its laws than any other in the world and yet it is unable 
to tyrannize over its own subjects. The history of our govern- 
ment shows that it has been an absolute force in hours of g^eat 
moment, and yet, a splendid boom to all its citizens on every oc- 
casion and in every condition . 

Our nation is a great one in its history. There is no one who 
can justly mingle so much pride and patriotism in the penning of 
the annals of his country as the American historian. Although 



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187 



our nation is but a little more than a century old, it has shown 
itself a marvel. The history of its rulers is the history of great 
men, not of tyrants. Our foreign and domestic policies, in charge 
of the most able statesmen and diplomats of their time, have always 
been tactful and honest. In military tactics and the marshaling 
of armies, American generalship has outwitted and baffled the 
military powers of the whole world. 

In science and art, we have held our own with modern na- 
tions, while, in inventions, we are a prodigy. We have given our 
share to literature, while, for the education of the masses, we have 
set up a system of schools that is working wonders. Churches, 
keeping alive the spirit of Christianity, are within the reach of all, 
and every one has access to them and allowed to worship unmo- 
lested. Our nation is a great one in benevolence. The great 
heart of the American people has always extended a helping hand 
to the famine stricken and oppressed at home and abroad. They 
have spent more, publicly and through private individuals, for 
philanthropic and benevolent purposes than any other nation . Our 
nation is, indeed, a great one in many respects, but, to its dis- 
credit, it has also its vices which, at times, seem very stupendous. 

Looking at the great powers of Europe, with all that they 
boast off, and, staring the evils of our Country square into the 
face, we still conclude that ours is the greatest and grandest na- 
tion which has ever existed. Long may it live. 

Las. 

£He Detlcben. 

My dear Marion: — 

It may seem strange to you to receive a valentine at this early 
date, but, knowing your fondness for violets, and, feeling sure 
that they would be acceptable at any time, I have chosen this op- 
portunity to tell you of a jolly lark for February fourteenth. Life 
has been exceedingly monotonous around here since the holidays, 
with nothing to do but grind, grind, grind; and stag parties are 
such tiresome affairs, especially, when one knows that there is a 
Seminary, full of jolly girls, less than two miles away. Now our 
plan is to have a wagon -party on the evening of St, Valentine's 
Day and we want you and Miss Hart and the Misses Van Bert- 



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land to accompany us. Of course, I know that the ogress will 
never permit you to go, but, I have noticed that the fire-escape 
runs past your window and, I am sure, that you can get out that 
way. Now, if you examine the violets, you will find my silver 
pencil concealed under the flowers, and, if you think that you can- 
not possibly make your escape, send it to me at once. Otherwise, 
meet me at the oak tree, at the south end of the campus, at half past 
eight o'clock. 

Yours as ever, 

Jack. 

This was the note she held in her trembling hands. Her cold, 
blue eyes snapped and her gray, cork-screw curls fairly danced 
with indignation. 

Ogress, indeed ! So that was the title she had won for herself! 
Was she really so hard and unsympathetic to the girls? As she 
looked back upon her career, as preceptress, she was filled with 
remorse. What right had she to dictate to the girls about their 
correspondents, and to examine their mail before they had received 
it? 

But, no, she would not waste her time in idle regrets and 
in self-reproach, for, after all, it was only a thoughtless school- 
boy's remark. She would send the flowers and the note to Miss 
Raymond immediately, and await the result 

Would the girls dare to do so rash an act as that ? Would 
they forget for a moment that expulsion would be the penalty? 

But, as her eye fell on the flowers, her stern features relaxed 
and her face assumed a dreamy expression. She was thinking of 
one who had been passionately fond of violets and who had been 
dearer than life to her. 

How well she remembered the day when, young and light- 
hearted, she had set out in compan\' with her aunt to see her sol- 
dier boy who was then in camp; how slowly the train moved, 
and how angry she w r as when it lingered an hour at a lonely place 
in the mountains! But her anger was soon dispelled, for, with a 
little cry of joy, she perceived that the side of the* mountain was 
blue with violets, and, in a short time, she had picked a great 
bunch of them. Would she ever forget how handsome he was in 
his uniform, and how fondly he looked down upon her and mur- 
mured "die Veilchen?" But that was all past. He had died in 
battle, and her life was cold and cheerless. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Were those tears dropping upon the flowers ? Surely , she had 
not yielded to such a weak impulse. 

Suddenly the bell aroused her to her responsibilities. Should 
she send the note to Miss Raymond? A great love for the girls 
suddenly sprung into her heart, and she was filled with a deep 
yearning for their affection. No, she would not subject her girls 
to such a temptation. She would send only the flowers to Miss 
Raymond who should be none the wiser and could enjoy them 
with a clear conscience. 

The evening of St. Valentine's Day was bright and beautiful. 
The moon, rising majestically in her course, shed her kindly beams 
over the slumbering earth. On the Seminary Campus all was si- 
lent save the tramp, tramp ol the watchman as he traveled his 
nightly rounds. Suddenly, the distant rumble of wheels broke 
the solemn stillness. The watchman stopped and listened; yes, 
the sound was drawing nearer ; now it ceased. Soon he spied the 
figure of a young man stealthily gliding among the shadows in the 
southern end of the Campus. He hastened to the oak tree and, 
to the great amazement of the youth, he handed him a silver pen- 
cil and a card on which was written, ' 'Compliments of the Ogress. " 

N. E. S., 'oo. 

Estimates of TOasbinstoru 

John B. McMaster, of the University of Pennsylvania, one of 
our most brilliant historians, has said, "General Washington is 
known to us, and President Washington, But George Washing- 
ton is an unknown man." Notwithstanding the numerous biog- 
raphies which have been written, nearly all of which are based on 
the most careful research of family and state papers, this statement 
cannot be disputed. There are several reasons for this. One is, 
that the eulogist, the prose writer, and the poet have, in their ad- 
miration for the man, misrepresented him to us. There is a tend- 
ency, even in the boasted enlightenment of the nineteenth century, 
to invest a hero with a mythical character The sentiment, which 
caused the Greeks and Romans to worship their forefathers, is no 
less prevalent to-day, with the exception that it has lost its relig- 
ious flavor. As a result of mistaken eulogy and erroneous theo- 
ries of ardent admirers, we look upon Washington as one standing 



190 



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apart from his contemporaries — of extraordinary mental ability, of 
remarkable moral force — one incapable of being "in all points 
tempted like as we are." Another reason for this false estimate 
of Washington is the myth as published by one who called him- 
self "rector of Mt. Vernon." Mason Weems wrote a short biog- 
raphy of him which had little historical value but sufficient literary 
merit to bring it into the homes of the mass of the people. It was 
widely read, finding its way to the mechanic's bench and to the 
house of the farmer, forming a part of the outfit of each emigrant 
train which ventured beyond the boarders of civilization, and 
treasured as much by the young adventurer as was the Iliad, by 
Alexander the Great. This biography contained the anecdote of 
the cherry tree, which is still being handed down from one gener- 
ation to another among the less enlightened class so that the story 
has become a part of the tradition of the people. The Washing- 
ton of Weems is a character far removed from the real man. He 
furnishes an endless theme for jokes and burlesque on the part of 
the American humorist. On each recurring 22d of February, 
the newspaper caricaturist uses this Washington to good effect. 
It is altogether unreasonable to think of Washington as the blame- 
less boy and the equally faultless and uninteresting man we find 
in this work. 

However, Washington was a hard man to know. He was a 
silent man. In all the volumes of Sparks' "Letters and Writings 
of Washington" there is nothing to be found outside of business. 
They are silent as to the writer himself. Behind and above these 
myths, behind the man as portrayed by preacher and orator, be- 
hind the general and president of the historian, there was a strong 
and vigorous man in whose veins coursed warm, red blood, and in 
whose heart were the ordinary passions of men and a deep sympa- 
thy for humanity, and in whose head were far-reaching thoughts. 
He was "the noblest figure that ever stood in the forefront of a 
nation's life. ! ' This nobility of character, which has assumed the 
mythical, was recognized not only by his conutryrnen, but also by 
those whom we would least expect to do honor to him. Febru- 
ary 9th, 1800, nearly two months after the death of Washington, 
was a gala day in Paris. By proclamation of Napoleon, the spoils, 
captured in Egypt, were displayed in a triumphant procession in 
the Champ de Mars. A feature, altogether out of harmony with 
the rejoicing incident to this pageant, was the crape hung from the 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



191 



standards and flags ; and, after the procession, the dignitaries of 
the land repaired to the Temple of Mars to hear an eloquent eulogy 
delivered on Washington. This eulogy was followed by a decree 
of the First Consul that a statue should be erected to George 
Washington on one of the squares of Paris. Coincident with these 
marks of respect by a people against whom, at the time of his 
death, Washington was arming his countrymen, tradition says 
that the Channel fleet of the nation from whom he had just wrested 
the empire of the West lowered its flags to half mast as a token of 
grief. This is the more remarkable because the English have 
always beeh unsparing critics of every thing American 

[n other countrfes Washington is better known than the 
country whose existence was made possible by the foundations as 
established by him. In the great monument, erected to his mem- 
ory on the banks of the Potomac, are stones sent from all parts of 
the world. Greece sent a fragment of the Parthenon. Brazil, 
Switzerland, Turkey, Japan, and Siam made contributions of na- 
tive stone. On the block sent by China is an inscription ascribing 
to Washington qualities greater than those of its own heroes. 
The tribute ends with these words : "Can any man of ancient or 
modern times fail to pronounce Washington peerless?" 

And so will he ever continue to be loved and esteemed by 
men, for they see, embodied in him, all the noblest possibilities of 
humanity. 

W. C. Arnold, '03. - 

Copper Deposit© tn IRortbem fllMcbigan. 

{Continued from last number^) 
Since the opening of these first modem mines the growth of 
the copper industry has been phenomenal. Capital and labor 
began to flow in a never ending stream to this region of treasure, 
and machinery is being perfected and added to the mine equip- 
ment until, today, some of them stand second to none on the globe; 
the winch has been superseded by the giant hoisting drums and 
engines that make it possible to draw from the mine, with the 
greatest ease, the nine-ton skip carrying nine or ten tons of copper 
and rock ; old mauls and gravity stamps have been supplanted by 
great steam stamps that strike blows of several foot-tons and 



192 THK COLLEGE FORUM. 

crush the most refactory rook like so much dried clay ; the intro- 
duction of the diamond drill has changed mining from a game of 
hazard, more or less skillfully played, to a legitimate industry in 
which there is scarcely a greater element of chance than in a well 
conducted manufacturing or commercial establishment. With 
the diamond drill a hole can be lowered a mile in depth, and the 
drill core thus becomes a matter of record of the sequence ofstrata. 
For exploratory purposes, it undeniably stands without an equal. 

The earliest of these mines were opened on fissure veins and 
worked primarily for the ores (black oxide and green carbonate) 
of copper, but, on digging to no great depths, the ores were found 
to diminish in volume while a peculiar red "rock" increased to 
the extent of alarming the Cornish miners, who in England were 
accustomed to mine for the ores only (the copper not occurring 
native); therefore they considered it an ill omen for the mining in- 
dustry in Michigan, but they finally came to the virgin copper, 
and even this was finally exhausted in some of the fissure veins. 

With the consciousness that the fissure veins would all sooner 
or later be exhausted, the miners applied themselves assiduously 
to the copper bearing rocks containing the copper deposited in one 
or another of its many varying forms from -finely specular to large 
hackly masses of many tons in weight. At the present time not 
one of the miners would for a moment think of merely opening up 
a mine on a fissure vein when machinery may be procured for 
separating the copper from the rocks— iusually anygdaloid. 

The term anygdaloid, from a Greek word for almond, does 
not refer to the kind of rock but to the rock texture. When lava 
is cooling, the escaping gas and steam, owing to their expansive 
force, have a tendency to form almond-shaped or elliptical cavities 
or cells in the upper portion of the flow. These cavities are after- 
ward drawn out into elongated aud irregular shapes by the flowing 
motion of the lava. The porous character of the rock, thus pro- 
duced, renders it liable to infiltrating mineral water, and, in course 
of time, the cavities are partially or completely filled with copper, 
which may have been deposited like some minerals from solutions; 
most likely by galvanism. The copper penetrates the other min- 
erals in finer reticulated films, or in delicate leaflets, or it has 
adapted itself in coarser masses to the interstices left between the 
other minerals ; more rarely it is found in druse cavities and could 
then develop itself in its own crystalline form in manifold modi- 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 193 

fications, which are highly esteemed by naturalists, and, more es- 
pecially, by a tribe of curiosity hunters who offer fabulous prices 
for them . The large masses of copper are generally found imbed- 
ded in calcspar, associated with laumonite, prehnite and epidote, * 

The copper is quite irregularly distributed in the rock belts 
of which there are no less than ten thruout the range ; the richer 
portions of the belts are copiously interspersed with large shot-like 
grains, and also with branching hackly masses of the metal which 
have moulded themselves after the shape of pre-existing fissures 
and cavities in the rock ; much of the copper is also contained in 
the amygdules in association with the other mentioned minerals, 
usually calcite, preharite or delassite. Other portions of the belts 
are poorer and the copper contained in them occurs in small mole- 
cules. In some mines practically no selection is attempted on the 
poorer rock Ironi the richer, the entire seam is taken out and the 
material run thru the stamp mill where, as an average result, three- 
fourths of one percent of the rock mass is obtained as metallic 
copper, while in the better lodes it may even reach two, but in 
the Calumet and Hecla this reaches three percent. The working 
capacity of the stamp mills is so great that this small yield of 
metal still leaves a profit to the company. Occasionally on the 
crossings of the calcspar with the amygdoloid, nests, and pockets 
of metallic copper and silver are found enclosed in the spar. 

A large additional quantity of copper in these mines is ob- 
tained in heavy masses, often many tons weight, which are depos- 
ited into crevices of the amygdaloidal belts in association with 
calcspar, and sometimes with porcelain -like datolite masses or 
other accompanying minerals. 

{To be continued.) 

Howard E. Enders, '97. 

Xecture* 

On Tuesday evening, January 30th, Hon. George R. Wend- 
ling delivered in the College Chapel his famous lecture on Saul of 
Tarsus. This was the fourth number in the series of lectures and 
entertainments for the year, and it is but just to say that none, 
thus far have been more pleasing. Owing to the wide reputation 
of Mr. Wendliug, and, because of the strong testimonials to his 



'94 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



ability as an orator, all anticipated something great; yet, if we are 
to judge from the general expression of opinion at the close of the 
lecture, the anticipations of everyone were fully realized. 

The lecturer dealt with the personage of Saul of Tarsus, rather 
than, Paul the Apostle. He presented most vividly the superior 
qualities and marks of greatness inherent in the character of Paul, 
aside from those supernatural influences brought to bear upon his 
life. Paul's amazing courage, his breadth of thought and feeling, 
and his ability as an orator, were the three features most strongly 
emphasized. 

There is no other example, in all human history, of such un- 
wavering courage and sublime heroism as that of Paul ; not even 
in such men as Moses and Elijah. Paul never doubted the^ gen- 
uineness of his experience on the way to Damascus, but, ever 
conscious of the grandeur of his calling, he pressed on through 
constantly increasing dangers and persecution to a glorious end. 

Few men have had the depth of mind, or, the fertility of thought 
which Paul had. He may be regarded as the Shakespeare of 
Christianity. The best intellects of eighteen hundred years have 
been sounding the heights and depths of his utterances. In his 
letter to the Romans, he sweeps over the entire scope of human 
emotions. 

As an orator, Paul has few if any equals, It is the custom, 
in the study of oratory, to set Paul aside as being too religious. 
This is a mistake and shows that people do not recognize his ora- 
torical genius. While the other great orators of the world, such 
as Demosthenes, Burke, Henry, and Webster, have won renown 
through their excellence in some specific feature of oratory, it is 
left to Paul to have combined all the qualities of the true orator, 
and thus to have been able to suit his style to the occasion. Paul 
possessed not only perfect self- poise, but, that most important of 
all the requisites of an orator, true earnestness. 

Junior Rhetorical. 

The first division of the Junior Class held its public rhetori- 
cal, on Saturday evening, January 27, in the College Chapel. An 
appreciative audience was assembled to hear the Junior orators, 
who delivered their orations in a creditable manner. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



J 95 



The programme rendered is as follows : 
INVOCATION 

Piano— Valsc, 

Lena Owens. 
ORATION— Our Priceless Heritage, 
EULOGY— Garret A. Hobart, 
ORATION— The Boss to Politics, 
VOCAL SOLO— Fairest Maiden, 

Reba Lehman. 
ORATION— The Responsibility of Man, 
ORATION — The Greatest Evil, 
ORATION— The Enduring Monument, 
PIANO— Trot de Cavalier, 

LilHau G. Kreider, 
ORATION— Voices of the Past, 
EULOGY— Dwtglit L. Moody, 
VOCAL SOLO— Still is the Night, 

Arabella Batdorf. 



Marek 

W. H. Burd. 
Emma F. Loos. 
H. H. Baish. 
Lucaloni 

K. Kuyoomjiaii. 
F. B. Emcnheiser. 
M. W. Brunncr. 
Rubinstein 

E. M. Balsbaugh. 
S, F, Daugherty. 

Bo Inn 



Banquet, 



Friday evening, February 2, was made an occasion of festiv- 
ity by the members of the Junior and Senior classes, who, at that 
time, shared in the pleasures of a banquet provided under the aus- 
pices of the former class. The banquet was held at the Hotel 
Eagle, whither, at the appointed hour, all were taken by cab and 
where the early part of the evening was spent in social conversa- 
tion and song. 

At 10.30, the dining hall was thrown open and the ladies and 
gentlemen of both classes, numbering in all forty-one persons, en- 
tered to partake of the rich feast prepared. The decorations were 
lavender and white, the colors of the Senior class, and orange and 
black, the Junior colors. 

The toastmaster of the evening was Mr. H. H. Baish who 
congratulated the two classes on the friendly relations existing be- 
tween them, and, in an appropriate manner, spoke of the auspic- 
iousness of the occasion. 

The first toast, "Our College," was responded to by Mr. 
Galen I). Light. Mr. Light said that L. V. C. stands for a 
grand motto, "Labor vincit culpas," meaning "Labor conquers 
defects." L. V. C. also stands for Light, Vigor, and Courtship. 
Light represents our intellectual development, Vigor, our physical 



io6 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



development, and Courtship, our social development. The speak- 
er's remarks were well received. 

Mr. A. E. Shroyer responded to the toast "Our Faculty." 
He called attention to the characteristics of each member of the 
faculty in a way that delighted all . 

The toast, "Senior Characteristics" was responded to in an 
able manner, by W. O. Roop, who said that the Seniors possessed 
the characteristics, desire to be something , kindness, appetite, and 
honesty. After eulogizing the farmer, he advised the Seniors to 
be farmers. He commended their honesty by saying that he saw 
them go to the class-room for a test, and fail rather than be dis- 
honest. 

The toast, "Our Boys," was responded to in a creditable man- 
ner, by Miss Arabella Batdorf. Mr. D. M. Oyer ably defended 
the other side in response to the toast, "Our Girls." 

The banquet proved a success in every way. and reflected 
credit upon the class which gave it. The following was the menu: 
Oysters on half shell 
Potage 

Green Turtle Hotel de Eagle 
Consume Deslignac 
Pot-au-Feu 
Queen Olives 

Celery Apple Sauce Cold Slaw 

Cold Meats 
Boneless Chickeu au Glace Transparent 
Roasts 
Turkey 
Turkey with oyster sauce 
Brown Gravy Cranberry Sauce 

Entrees 

Parson Victims mangled a la Petits Pois 
Oyster Salad Deviled Crabs 

Vegetables 

Sugar Corn Sweet Potatoes 

String Beans 

French Peas Glazed Onions 

Asparagus on Toast 
Desserts 

Mince Pie English Plum Pudding 

Bisque Ice Cream with Custard 
Oranges Bananas 

Malaga Grapes 

Figs Dates 

Raisins 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



197 



Assorted Nuts 

Cheese 

Crackers Tea 

CauQbt on a fly. 

Hello ! 

Peninsula ! ! ! 

Jr.— Sr. Banquet! ! !! 

Freshmen are playing marbles. 

Prof. — What is a theory ? 
N — S y, — A theory is a fact in embryo. 

Dr. , — (To a young Senior.) You must use tact to get 

around . 

Miss K. , — I have tried to use it all year but find it 

more convenient for gentlemen. 

G. M. S o e, — (In Geology,) Cephalopods have ten-tackles. 
(tentacles). 

In all probability we will soon hear of an exciting foot-ball 
game scheduled between Squids and Cuttle-fishes. 

II . — C. — Olorum, — (To witness) What day did you see the 
victim in the room where the crime was committed? 

Sh--s — y, — Your Honor, most excellent H. — C. — Olorum, 
I don't know ; ain't remarkable for the day. 

A new postal system has recently been instituted, which has 
reached its perfection in the class-room. Thus far it has prog- 
ressed rapidly under the general management of Mr. C. E. S- e 

with Miss L. K r as first assistant. The principle matter ex- 
changed has been rubbar boxes, notes, love letters, dates, smiles, 
chestnuts, and other merchandise. 

Dr. R — Suggest some name to illustrate a concept. . 
Miss K . Mr. Jones. 



Confectioneries 
Coffee 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Hostess,— Miss B f. Will you have an apple? 

Miss B, — Yes, thank you, I will take apple, Core and all. 

Sophy —Why is Miss L n like a swelled headed pullet? 

Fresh, — Because she must have the Roop. 

-A 

fl>bilo IRotes. 

The annual election of the editorial staff and board of mana- 
gers, held on January 5th, which, for some reason, did not appear 
in the January number of the Forum, resulted in the election of 
the following persons :— Editor-in-Chief, Galen D. Light, 'oo; 
Associate Editors, H. E. Spessard, 'oo; H. H. Baish, ! oi ; A. 
C. T. Sumner, '02, and C. W. Christman, '03. The formerbus- 
iness managers S. F. Daugherty, 'oi, and H. L. Ei^hinger, '03, 
were re-elected. On account of the increasing business of the 
Forum, a third business manager, W. C. Arnold, '03, was elected. 

Two new members, Titus H.|Kreider, and Herbert U. Risser, 
have joined the society. 

The new library catalogue containing a list of almost one 
thousand books, is now ready for distribution. They can be ob- 
tained by calling upon the librarian. 

On February 23, a joint session will be held with the Clio so" 
ciety. The evening will be devoted to short stories and short 
story writers. We anticipate an enjoyable time. 

J. Walter Esbenshade, '03. 

-A 

Ikalo IRotes, 

"Work is the law of success." Knowing the truth of their 
law, K. L- S. is making great efforts, and success is being realized. 
All the regular meetings have been sources of great intellectual 
improvement, and earnest zeal is shown in the business meetings. 
"Tout bien ou rien;" "Do it well or not at all" is the impelling 
sentiment. 

During the past month, the society has been especially honored 
by the presence of Prof Lehman and wife, Prof B. F. Daugherty 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



[99 



and wife, and Prof Shenk. With earnestness they commend the 
work of the society, encourage its members, and exhort all to a 
still greater activity along literary lines. 

During the month, Messrs. L Wiuey and H. F. Rhoad have 
determined to climb to the height of intellectual achievements 
under the honored banner of K. L. S. 

Preparations are being made for the coming anniversary and 
the society will be represented by Messrs. Shroyer, '00, Long, 'oo, 
Rupp, 'oi, and Dericksou, '02. The Rev. Samuel J. Evers, A. B., 
B. D., of Glenbrook, Connecticut, will be the honorary orator. 

The ninth of March will be the climax of the Winter term's 
work — an "Educational Evening" to be speut with our Clio sis- 
ters. Eich one is looking forward to a "feast of good things" and 
to all who wonder what these may be, we say "Come and see." 

Donald J. Cowling, '02. 

E>< no. c. h. 

Messrs. Galen D. Light and D.J. Cowling have been elected 
delegates to the State Convention which meets at Williarasport, 
February 12 -25. 

A number of membership cards were issued during the month 
Almost all the young men in College are now members of the Y . 
M. C. A. The meetings every Sunday afternoon are largely at- 
tended and full of interest. 

Prof. Schlichter gave a good address on "City Missions" and 
Miss Lehman read an instructive paper on "Porto Rican Missions" 
at the monthly missionary meeting on January 28. 

The Day of Prayer for Students on February 1 1 , was one that 
will uot soon be forgotten by those who attended the services in 
the Chapel. 

Rev. C. E. Hurlburt, of Philadelphia, lead the Sunday morn- 
ing service. He also spoke at the afternoon meeting iu the Chapel 
before a large audience of students and citizens of Annville. 

There were several conversions and many expressed a desire 
to live nearer to Christ, 

It is hoped that, ere long, every student in the College will be 
an active Christian. 



200 



THE COLLEGE FORUM, 



Conservator? of flDueic. 



On Saturday evening, February ro, the students of the Con- 
servatory Department gave their thirteenth recital in the College 
Chapel. The effort was a most entertaining one and was enjoyed 
b} r a large audience, composed not only of College students and 
citizens of Annville, but, many friends of the College from Leba- 
non and other points. The following is the program as rendered — 
PIANO— Polonaise in D, Chopin. 

Mary Horetick. 
VOCAL DUET— Rose of Love, Cowen. 

Lillie Kreider, Mary Z icharias. 
PIANO— Nocturne, C minor, Chopin. 

Arabella Batdorf. 
PIANO— La Favorite, Ascher. 
Emily Loose. 

VOCAL SOLO— Ave Maria, Bach-Gounod. 
Anna Kreider. 
Piano, Lena Owens. Organ, H. Oldham. 
Violin, Fred Light. 
PIANO— Rliapsodie, 14. Liszt. 
Carrie Fretz. 

CHORAL HYMN — "Hear My Prayer," Mendelssohn. 
Soprano solo, AJta Booth. 
Piano, Lena Owens. Organ, H. Oldham, 
and Choral Class. 
PIANO— Valse in E, Moskowski. 

Mabel Manbcck. 
PIANO — {a) Mazurka, in B flat, Chopiu. 

(o) Polonaise, in C sharp, Chopin, 
(c) Legeude, Wieniaivski. 
{d) Gavotte, Silas. 
Herbert Oldham. 



Hlumni et alumnae. 



'99. 

Mr. Mahlon Miller, who has been employed at the Cash Reg- 
ister, Dayton, Ohio, was recently elected to their roll of honor for 
offering some valuable suggestions. 

'97- 

Mr. N. C. Schlichter recently gave an address on "English 
Literature" at Irving College. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



201 



'94- 

Hon. J. Dixon Rice, who is becoming proficient at the bar in 
Chambersburg, entertained Dr. Roop, February 9th. 

'94- 

Rev. and Mrs. David S. Eshelman were called to Dayton, 
Ohio, to attend the funeral of her mother, February 10th. 

'9i- 

Miss L. M. Quigley was the guest of Miss Mary Shenk, for 
several days. 

'88. 

Hon. W. M. Hain has recently risen to prominence at the bar 
in Harrisburg. 

,87. 

Hon. C. H. Backenstoe is likewise becoming distinguished in 
the same profession. 

'$5- 

Rev. J. A. Lyter visited Dr. Roop. 

77- 

We wish to put Mr Geo. W. Gensmer on the list of our 
truly loyal alumni. This has recently been illustrated by his lib- 
eral donation to the furnishing of our new Musk Hall. 

Mrs. Vallerchamp spent some time with her daughters, Misses 
Jennie and Clara Vallerchamp. 

Rev. V. S. G. Reun, pastor of the U. B. Church, Ephrata, 
Pa., paid his nephew, Mr. W. J. Sanders, '02, a short visit on 
January 31. 

Mr. I. K. Fisher preached for Rev C. E. Boughter, in West 
Lebanon U. B. Church, Tuesday evening, January 30. 

Revs. R. R. Butterwick, 'or, and A. K. W T eir, 'oo, the former 
in charge of Sinking Spring circuit; the latter of St. John's, re- 
sumed their college work on Monday, January 29. They were 
conducting a series of revival services at their respective charges. 

Mr. D. Brandt returned home on account of sickness. We 
trust he is convalescing. 

Mr. Alfred Sumner, '02, conducted missionary services at 



202 



THE COLLEGE KORUM. 



Shippensburg U. B. Church, both morning and evening of Feb. 
4. He addressed the Y. M. C. A. of said town in the afternoon. 

Mr. W. R. Kohr and Miss Nettie Lockemau were visited by 
their mothers, Mrs. D. \V. Kohr and Mrs. H. L. Lockeman, both 
of York, Pa. 

Miss Ruth Vallerchamp spent some time with her sisters 
Misses Jennie and Clara Vallerchamp. 

Miss Nora Spayd, 'oo, enjoyed for a few days, the company 
of her cousin, Miss Bess Seltzer. 

Pres. Roop entertained some of his friends at dinner. 

Messrs. R. R. Butter wick, Seth A. Light, and G. 0. Light 
attended a Valentine Sociable, given by the Twentieth Century 
Club, of Jonestown, on February [4. 

An Entertainment under the auspices of the Athletic Asso- 
ciation was given in the College Chapel, on February 22. 

Exchangee. 

Among our most welcome exchanges, this month, is the 
Otierbein Aegis. The first article in the Aegis on ' 'Originality ' ' is 
worthy of careful reading. The editorials are also up to date. 

A "Porto Ricau Idyl," in the Dickivsoni.au, is one of the 
best short stories we have read in the January exchanges. 

The literary department of the Western Maryland College 
Monthly is far above the average, this month. 

The Graphic deplores the lack of class spirit at Hedding Col- 
lege. A little generous rivalry and class pride is certainly a de- 
sirable auxiliary to College life. 

The Lesbian Herald from the Woman's College, Frederick, 
Md,, was read with considerable interest. The poem, "There 
Isn'ta Man in Sight," appealed especially to the Exchange Editor. 

"The Parson's Plan," a short story in The Eatonian, should 
be read by all bashful young men. The editorial department did 
not do the paper justice last month. 

One of the most interesting and attractive pages of the Cri- 
terion is the one on which the editorial staff appears. The high 
literary standing of this publication is now accounted for. ■ 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



We desire to acknowledge the following exchanges: — Otter- 
bein Aegis, The Ealonian, Gates Index, The Criterion, Emerson 
College Magazine , The Mirror, 'The Comenian, The Lesbian Herald, 
The Hedding Graphic, The Mercersburg Monthly, The Phoenix, 
Western Maryland College Monthly, Ursinus College Bulletin, 'The 
Dickinsonian, The Red and Bin:, 'The Indian Helper, and the 
Pennsylvania Chauta uquan . 

You can ride a horse to water 

But you cannot make him drink, 
You can ride your little pony, 

But you cannot make him think. Ex. 



If you want lo Buy a Hal RiRht, »«d .i 
ki^lit Hiit, or anything 111 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS, 

<^ Erb & Craumer, 

8th ami Cumberland Sts. 
LEBANON, - - - PA, 



L. Y. G. QUARTETTE 

COMPOSED OF 

H, E. Spessard, 

S. D. Kaufman, 

W. S. Roop, 

C, R. Engle, 
H. L. Ekhinger, Elocutionist, 

a strong concert company well pre- 
pared to give first class entertain- 
ments. 

Y. M. C, A., 

C. E. SOCIETY, 

CHURCH 

wishing a good entertainment can- 
not do better than to engage the 
L. V. C. Quartette. 

For terms, dates, etc., address the 
manager, 

h- L. Eichinger, 

flnnville. Pa, 



H.S. WOLF, 

. — DlJALl^li IN — » 

Green Groceries 

and Confections, 

Restaurant In connection. 

Stephen Hubertis 

1 1 25 and 1 127 North Third St., 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Blank Book Manufacturer 

and JOB BOOK BINDER, 



ku ling, 
Numbering, 



Wire 
Stitching, 



WE AVE A ORGRN & PIANO 
COMPANY, 

MANUFACTURERS 

YORK, PA. 

U. S- A. 

Established 1870 
Encorpo rated 1882 




Capital, . . . 
Surplus, . . . 
.Annual Business, 



£120,000.00 
80,000.00 
210,000.00 



Ample experience, ample capital and 
ample facilities to know the wants 
of the people and supply them. 



Harry Light 

Books ano 
Stationers 



22 East Main Street, 
Annville, Pa. 



New, second-hand and shelf worn 
COLLEGE TEXT 
BOOKS. 

STATIONERY, 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES. 

Students' Supplies a Specialty. 

West End Store J 

General — — — ^ 
Merchandise 

Shoes and Gent's Furnishing Gnods 
a Specialty. 

.34-136 West Main Street. 

ANNVILLE. PA, 

i860 1885 

J. HENRY MILLER, 

General Insurance Agent, 

S. W. Cor. 8th and Willow, 

LEBANON, PA. 

ALL COMPANIES FXttST-CLASS. 



E. B. MARSHALL, M. D 

NO. 34 EAST MAIN STREET, 

ANN VILLE, PA. 
KS'f A ULISHED 1851. 

Theo Leonanlt & Son 

LITHOGRAPHERS, 

5th and Liberty Sts., PHIL A. 

Diplomas and Certificates of 
riembership. 
Commercial Work our Specialty. 



SHENK & KINPORTS., 

ANNVILLE, PA, 

0^1^ 10 nry Goods, Notions, 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we nwike a «ptv»tUy. 
Home made, Ingrain and Brussels Carpets 
Vou buy Cheaper from us than away limn 
home, ftttd have a large stock to select from 



J, G. 6ARMAN, 

B + A * R * B * E + R 

Livery Attached. R. Main St. 

JOSEPH MILLER, 

Furniture & Undertaking. 

ANNVSLLE, PA. 



W. C. IniOOt-R, 

Notions, Groceries, Etc. 

62 East Main St. 



Sheffey's Furniture Store, 

Cor. Main and 

White Oak Street. 
Undertaking A Specialty. 

JOS. a. smithV 

Hardware, Plain, . . . 

Stamped & Japanned Ware. 

ANNVILLE, - - PA. 

J. S. KEND1G, 
B • K • K • £ • R 

Next Door to Hotel Eagle. 
Harry Zimmerman, D. D. S., 

Dental IRoonts, 

72 W. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 

The Northwestern Mutual Lifa 
Insurance Co., of Milwaukee, Wis. 

R. A MATrLFAIRrOen. Agt . 

ANNVILLE, HA. 



All the latest and best policies issued. 

7V*. H. SHHUD, 

• — DKALKR IN — • 
WATCHES AND JEWELRY, 

Wliolenflte awl Retail Dealer iu 

FINE 23 AND 
CANDIES 3* FRUITS. 

Families supplied with OYSTERS. 



Eastman Business College 

Has iu its half century of work de- 
veloped the capacity of thousands in- 
to well-trained men, capable to fill 
every department of a business career. 
Known everywhere for the thorough- 
ness ofthe preparation given in the 
least time at the smallest expense. 



The System of Teaching 1 

Is baised on actual daily experience 
in every branch of business, includ- 
ing Merchandising, Bookkeeping, 
Hanking, Commercial Law, Penman- 
ship, Correspondence, Arithmetic, 
Telegraphy, Stenography, Type-writ- 



i 

LJ'_' 





The Journal or Annual Catalogue will interest 
you. Write for it. Address 

CLEMENT C GAINES, President, 
POUQMKEEPSIE. N. V. 



Young Men Trained 

To be all-round business men r — or 
they iiwv take up a special branch of 
business and be THOROUGH iu that. 

No better illustration of the value of 
a business education can be offered 
than i he success of those who have 
graduated from Eastman College. 

By the old way, training for business 
was acquired through years of ap- 
prenticeship, hut the successful man 
of today is the one who enters the 
field prepared for the work he is to do 
by the new and shorter methods of 
Eastman College, the model business H 
school . 



A Thorough Business Man 

Is the description of the man who 
becomes successful, is known and has 
the confidence of the community. 



BUSINESS HOUSES supplied with 
competent assistants. Situations se- 
cured without charge, for all gradu- 
ates of the Business and Short-haud 
Conrses.an invalnablefeature to many 
young people. Open all the year. 
Time sltort. Terms reasonable. Ad- 
I dress as above. 



Translations 

Literal Interlinear, 
6y Volumes. 

Dictionaries 

German, French, 
Italian, Spanish, 
Latin and Greek. 



Arthur Hinds & Co., 

4 Cooper Institute, New York. 

WERNER'S 
MAGAZINE 

Is full of aluable material, written 
by the world s specialists, on 

Song, Speech, the Delsarte System, 
Physical Culture, Oratory, Elo- 
cution, Extemporaneous 
Speaking and Kindred 
Subjects, 

Its Recitation and Declamation de- 
partment Is full of the newest and best 

Recitations, Declamations, Enter- 
tainments, Monologues, Panto- 
mimes, Drills, Plays, Lesson- 
Talks, Suggestive Pro- 
grams and Chats. 



A. C. ZIMMERMAN, 

Carpets, F^ugs, 
Oil Clotrjs, 

758 Cumberland Street, 
LEBANON, PA. 

ANYTHING YOU WANT IN 

Cameras, SISSE?* 

L. G. HARPEL, 

At McGowali's Drug Store, * 

S. W. Cor. 7th and Cumb. St.. 

LEBANON, PA. 



S, M. SHENK'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS OS HAND 

Fresh Bread, Cakes and Rolls. 

One door IVest f'etimi. House, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

Stephen Lane Folger, 

Manufacturing Jeweler, 

Clab, College and Fraternity 
Emblems, Watches, Diamonds 
and } ewelry. 

198 Broadway, NEW YORK, 

Special Designs, also Estimates I-imiMn-fl. 



RISE & GATES, 

Photo Artists 

152 N. Eighth Street, 
LEBANON, PA. 

Special Inducements to Students. 



Gat Rate 
Clothing Go., 

OPERA HOUSE BLOCK 

LEBANON, PA. 

The One Price Men's and Boy's 

Clothier and Furnisher. 



New Commonwealth 

shoe STORE. 

Makes it a special object to stu- 
dents in the way of a liberal discount 
to buy their SHOES of them. 

753 Cumb. St. LEBANON, PA. 

THOMAS H.ELLIOTT, 

All Kinds oF|Shoe Repairing. 
New work made to order. 



WHY NOT BUY the | 1 L Temberqer a coT~ 



Finest ORGAN Made 




Especially when you can get it at the 
same price as other organs are sold for. 
Intending purchasers should send to us 
for catalogue, etc. We are also general 
agents for the KRAKAUER PIANO for 
Eastern Pennsylvania. Over 200 of these 
Pianos in use in the city of Lebanon 
alone. It is the finest and ^est piano 
made, and prices very reasonabl e. Pianos 
as low as $150. Catalogues, etc., free. 

MILLER ORGAN CO., Lebanon 

ARE YOU getting ready 

to be MARRIED? 

If so, you will soon be looking around 
For furniture. Perhaps you are already 
married! and would like some new furni- 
ture to brighten up your home ? A par- 
lor auite. bed room set, book case, odd 
chairs, dresser, etc. Perhaps an office 
desk. You can buy the world r&mous 
high grade Grand Rapids furniture direct 
from the factory and thereby save the 
retailers' profit. A dollar saved is two 
dollars earned. Send for catalogue. 
Grand Rapids Furniture Company, 
GR AND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Wnu Kiebler, 

Shaving and Hair Cutting:, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop. ANfJVriJLK. PA, 



H>ru<Kltsts ano 



pbatmacists, 

LEBANON, PA. 



STH AND OUMS STS. 

Our d a mi in all ive do ' 

QUALITY— Of first importance— ACCURACY . 



JACOB SARGENT, 

•-•FASHIONABLE TAILOR,* 

18 and ao W. Main St., ANNVILLE. 



60 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE, 



Patents 



TRADE MARKS* 
DESIGNS, 
COPYRIGHTS Ac. 

Anyone sending a sketch and deBcriyitiii;] may 
uiclttr aeCTttiin. tree, whether nu lirvotitlr>al« 
■robuhlj MfceutJiMo. (V.tsmiuuicutli'mH ulrlctlj 
ontldeutlal. Ulrti3»t aeoney fnrflwiiiriitfc patent* 



special notice in the 

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, 



loe. 
wive 



Boon OK Patents eeut free. Addreaa 

MUNN & CO., 
361 Broadway, New York. 



on of 
i Tour; 
SL&KQ 



Kreider & Co,, 



H, H. Krvider 
Jno. B. H*rr 

DIALERS IN ALL KINOS Cyf? 

Hard & Soft Goal, Grain, Seeds, Salt, Feed. 

Office. Kiiiltoacl St,. Near Uefict. 
Telephone Connection. 



Annvllie, Pa 



F. W. FROST, 

Book Binder and Blank Book 
Manufacturer. 

783 Cumberland St., LEBANON, PA. 



Rensselaer % 

Polytechnics 5 ^ 
%^ Institute, 

%f Troy, N.Y. 

t/>nalas&mivntinti» provided I at, fisnd for • CatnJonMt 

Advertise in the Forum 



aillllMmilllHrtllllllillHllllllllWlIHr«IMItil1HUIIIIII11IIIHIIIIIIIIJUHIII«lllllllllllllltll1IIIIIIHmilllllg 

I Lebanon Valley College, [ 

= X 

I ANNVILLE, PA. | 

E This College, founded in 1866 and chartered with full univer- § 

E sity privileges by our State Legislature in 1867, stands for charao E 

= ter, high scholarship and noble manhoodand womanhood. Here S 

5 choice young people from various states come into competition and E 

E fellowship with one another, and with teachers of high character. E 
E sound learning and progressive methods and ideas- 

I The College Department | 

S Offers three full four year courses of study and provides as varied S 

S and thorough learning and excellent results in mental discipline = 

E and culture as are to be gained anywhere in the state. The regular E 

E departments of instruction include Philosophy, embracing Mental, = 

E Moral and Pedagogical Science; Ancient Languages (Latin ami EE 

E Greek); Mathematics; English Language and Literature ; History E 

^ and Political Science; Modern Languages (German and French); E 
i§ English "Bible : Physical Culture ; Elocution. 

1 The Academic Department | 

E Covers the work of the standard High and Normal Schools and E 

2 Academies and prepares for College, Teaching and Business. 

1 The Conservatory of Music | 

jf Offers complete courses in Pianoforte, Voice, Organ, Harmony, E 
S etc., after methods of the foremost European Conservatories. The = 
E various branches of art are also taught. 

I ADVANTAGES j 

Thoroughness, Cheapness, Completeness, Commodious Build- E 

E ings and a fine campus for Athletic purposes. E 

The personal attention given each student secures to him a E 

E splendid education under the most stimulating influences. E 

Winter Term begius January 2, 1900; Spring Term, March 27. 5 

E For further information, address : = 

President Hen/in U. Roop, PI). D., 
I ANNVILLE, PA = 



^IHMIIHItlllllltlllllll 1 I*I|I|IUIIIIIIHH llllllltlll 1 1 II llltlllll IIIIIIIUIIIIIHIHIillHlHlllllHlllllllHiUHIirillirP 



THE COLLEGE FORUM 



Vol. XIII. MARCH, 1900. No. 1. 



STAFF: 

Galen D. Light, 'oo, Editor-in-Chief. 
ASSOCIATE : 

Harry E. Spessard, 'oo. Alfred C. T. Sumner, '02. 

Henry H. Baish, 01. Charles W. Christman, '03. 

BUSINESS MANAGERS : 
S. F. Daugherty, '01, Chief. 
H. L. Eichinger, '03, Assistant. W. C. Arnold, '03, Assistant. 

The College Forum is published monthly by the Philokosmian Literary Society 
of Lebanon ValleyCollege. 

The College Forum will be forwarded to all subscribers until an order is received for 
its discontinuance, and all arrearages have been paid. Address all business communica- 
tions to S. F. Daugherty, Business Manager, Box 184, Annville, Pa. 

All matter intended for the Forum should be submitted to the Editorial Staff not later 
than the 15th of the month preceeding its appearance in the Forum's columns. 

TERMS :— fifty Cents Per Year. Single Copy, 10 Cts. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as s» cond-class mail matter. 



EDITORIAL. 



"Unity is strength" has become a time- 
POt6nC\) worn expression, whose truth is verified 

Of UlrUtp. daily on every hand. Small particles of a- 
toms form the molecules which produce the 
sturdy oak that scorns the howling tempests ; little drops of water 
make the boundless tides of the ocean ; little grains of sand make 
the solid portion of our globe. Could these small things have 
produced such marvelous results had there not been a union be- 
tween them ? No ! The grammarians differ as to which of the 
two sentences is correct — one and one is two, and one and one 
are two. Relative to our subject, we fall in with the former, 
for the idea of plurality is swallowed in that of unity. Every va- 
riation from unity is a step towards plurality and nullity. Our 
world and the measureless waste of the heavens, where sway in 
perpetual motion thousands of worlds, is the product of the great 
Triune Unity. The marvelous engines and machines of the 
present day are so, because of the exquisite agreement in their 
several component parts. The world's greatest battles have been 
won by those victorious, because there was unity of purpose in 



0 50 

flirt -*eb*VW 
2 THE COLLEGE FORUM. 

their midst. "United, we stand ; divided we fall." If a single 
person is linked to the Trinity in Unity, we are assured that he 
will be able to chase a thousand and put ten thousand to flight. 

A ship without a rudder could not make 

H)efimteness vs. 

an easy cut in the waves any more than a 
■ffn&efttUteneSS. student would with no definiteness in his 

studies. Even though the ship, after 
months of laborious toil, may ultimately reach harbor, yet, how 
much earlier would she have reached, had she had a rudder- 
that which, although not propelling her, yet directs her course 
even safely between Scylla and Chary bdis. How much time and 
health and money and labour would many a student save if he had 
more definiteness in his studies. It creates push for your work ; 
gives vigor to your manhood. As a drop of water falling con- 
tinually on the solid ground, though at first but to scatter in dif- 
ferent directions, yet, with a definite blow at a definite spot, the 
ground will at last yield; so definiteness will finally realize its 
end. To be definite is to be purposeful. To be indefinite is to be 
idle ; to be idle is to be lazy ; to be lazy is to be good for nothing. 
So much difference there is between the two as is between day 
and night. The one stimulates you to do something ; the other 
disqualifies you, even though you could do anything. Let there 
be definiteness in everything you do. 

* * 

Any person, acquainted with the South 
Hre tbe African affairs, cannot but have a feeling of 

Boers IRtgbt? P il; y for the Boers - 0lll y hard-heartedness 
can prevent us from sympathizing with 
them, if we but reflect and appreciate the hardships and struggles 
to which these people have subjected themselves. But sympathy 
is not approval. Is not our enthusiasm, in "many parts of the 
United States, running too high ? Are we not apt to forget to 
review the causes leading up to the present war, and frame our 
opinions from mere superficial accounts, which we may chance to 
gather from the daily accounts of the war ? Since the agreement 
between Great Britain and the South African Republic, consent 
ing to the restoration of the independence of the Transvaal State, 
granting to all persons, who remained loyal to Her Majesty in th± 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



3 



hostilities during the time of the convention in 1884, that, "They 
should have full liberty to reside in the country, with the enjoy- 
ment of all civil rights, and the protection of their persons and 
property. ' ' The Boers have looked upon the growth of the foreign 
population with alarm and chagrin, and the present struggle is 
but the outgrowth of their jealousy. It is true they have been fight- 
ing for th;ir freedom; but the object of this freedom has lodged in it 
the hope, that they may more successfully oppress the Anglo-Saxon 
immigrants, namely the Uitlanders. No American values freedom 
more than the Boers. But they are fighting for freedom, which 
will deprive others of freedom, that they may establish a kingdom 
of blood which shall prevent Anglo-Saxons from enjoying what 
they think to be a special heritage. The Boers are wrong. The 
English are right and are figting for a cause which the American 
people would fight for under similiar circumstances. The Boers 
will receive better freedom than they ever had under the old oli- 
garchy. We need to extend our sympathy to the English while 
fighting for the good of humanity ; just as they so freely did to us 
in our late war against Spanish Tyranny. 

"A 

Sources of tbe Constitution of IRnitefc States. 

Greater credit was never givtn to American constructive 
statesmanship than when Mr. Gladstone said: "As the British 
Constitution is the most subtle organism that has proceeded from 
progressive history, so the American Constitution is the most 
wonderful work ever struck off at a given time by ■ the brain and 
purpose of man." Much as we may appreciate the compliment 
Mr. Gladstone pays "The Fathers" we must dissent from his in- 
ference that in framing the Constitution they broke loose from the 
past. Interesting, in this connection, is the statement of Mr. 
James Bryce when he says, "There is little in this Constitution 
that is absolutely new. There is much that is as old as the Magua 
Charta." 

American writers also hold diverse views upon this subject. 
In an admirable work entitled, "The Sources of the Constitution 
of the United States," the Rev. Dr. C. Ellis Stevens finds an Eng- 
lish origin for most of the cardinal features. On the other hand, 
Mr. Sidney George Fisher, after a careful study of colonial char- 



4 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



ter and constitutions, concludes that the Constitution is evolved 
out of the political experience of the colonists, representing the 
best thought on the subject as these English and American 
authorities do, the question is what parts of the Constitution 
are original? What is derived from England, and what is there- 
suit of the political experience of the colonists ? 

In the first place it is to be observed that England has no 
written constitution. True, she has the Magna Charta and the 
Bill of Rights but these are not constitutions in the American sense 
for they do not create governments. 

The colonies of Hartford, Windsor and Wethersfield were the 
pioneers in constitution making. The people of these colonies 
were emigrants from Massachusetts, and they modelled their 
constitution on the government of Massachusetts as it had developed 
under the charter of 1629. Being outside the jurisdiction of 
Massachusetts or of any other colony, they were free to act with- 
out any outside interference. They framed the famous "Funda- 
mental Orders of Connecticut," which Mr. Bryce calls the first 
truly political written Constitution in history." This constitu- 
tion provides for a legislature or general court, a governor, and 
magistrates very much like the "assistants to the governor" in 
Massachusetts. The magistrates are elected by the people and are 
given judicial power. The right of impeachment is vested in the 
general court. 

From this time until the adoption of the Constitution of the 
United States, there was a gradual development in the process of 
constitution making. In West Jersey, in the 1 ' Fundamental Laws 
Agreed Upon" appears the statement that "The Constitution must 
not be violated by the assembly, and any assemblyman moving 
anything unconstitutional shall on proof of seven eye-witnesses be 
proceeded against as a traitor. ' ' Later in Penn 's ' 1 Frame of Gov- 
ernment," 1682-83, provision is made for amending the Constitu- 
tion. It could be done "by the consent of the governor and six 
parts in seven of the Council and Assembly." In these docu- 
ments constitutional law is clearly differentiated from ordinary 
statute law — something entirely unknown in England. That the 
written constitution was firmly established before 1789, is evi- 
denced by the fact that at the beginning of the Revolution when 
Congress advised the colonies to organize governments, all the 
colonies framed written constitutions with the exception of Rhode 
Island and Connecticut, these latter being satisfied with their lib- 
eral charters. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



5 



While the colonists were experimenting on charters and con- 
stitutions they were profoundly influenced by several theories of 
government. All their political philosophy was based on the 
theory of natural rights, the contract theory of the origin of gov- 
ernment, and the theory of a division of powers. The theory of 
natural rights and the contract theory growing out of it, was large- 
ly derived from Locke's Essay on Government and the works of 
other contemporaries. 

The theory of a division of powers which finds its application 
in the United States Constitution was taken from Montesquieu's 
celebrated work entitled the "Spirit of Laws. ' ' Montesquieu made 
a thorough study of the governments of Europe with special ref- 
erence to their attitude toward civil liberty and political equality. 
He found the fullest enjoyment of these blessings in England and 
attributed it to a division of powers which separates the executive 
from the legislative and the judicial from both, and yet gives 
them sufficient control over one another to form a system of checks 
and balances. This principle found its way into nearly all the 
state constitutions and finally into the National Constitution. It 
was thought that without a Division of Powers there could be 
no assurance of liberty. 

Did the convention, that framed the Constitution, copy the bi- 
cameral legislative system after the model of the British Parlia- 
ment or was it a natural colonial growth? It seems to be the 
general impression that the Senate is modelled after the House of 
Lords and the House of Representatives after the Commons. In 
favor of this contention it may be said that in the convention that 
framed the Constitution the analogies and differences were frequent- 
ly pointed out. On the other hand there seems to be a gradual 
development, for in the early history of nearly all the colonies there 
was a numerous body, usually representative called the General 
Assembly, House of Representatives or the like. Then there was 
a council with ill defined power, sometimes executive, sometimes 
legislative, sometimes judicial. In Massachusetts, after 1629, we 
find this council (assistants to the governor) sitting with the whole 
body of freemen to enact laws. Henceforth the council as a part 
of the law making body is fairly well established. 

In Penn's frame of 1683 the council becomes a separate upper 
house, and the principle of dividing the members of the council 
into classes, so that one-third should retire from office each year, 
is established. 



6 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



In the Massachusetts charter of 169 c the council is to be 
chosen to represent certain localities or great districts, i. e, Maine, 
New Plymouth, Massachusetts Bay and the land between the 
Sagdahoc River and Nova Scotia. Thus colonial history lends 
color to the view that the Senate is a growth from the governor's 
council. In 1789, the bi cameral system had been adopted by 
nearly all the states and little difficulty was found in this matter 
when it was considered by the Convention. 

On the question of the executive, the colonists had sufficient 
experience with colonial governors and English kings to know 
that what was needed was a strong executive whose power was 
held in check by a limited tenure of office, and by the legislative 
and judicial departments. Thus the President is given a sus- 
pensive veto, his power of making treaties and appointments is 
restricted by requiring the confirmation of the Senate, and he is 
subject to impeachment. 

Of the original features of the Constitution the greatest is 
the Supreme Court. This court seems necessary for a federation 
in which the States retain many of the attributes of sovereignty. 
When the colonies were English dependencies, disputes between 
them were referred to the British Privy Council, and while this is 
a precedent for referring disputes between States to a higher tri- 
bunal, there was no such institution as the Supreme Court in any 
Country. 

The Bill of Rights, which is found in the first amend- 
ments to the Constitution, contains much that is found in the 
Magna Charta, the Acts of the Long Parliament, and the Bill of 
Rights of 1688. Such principles as the right of trial by jury, the 
right of impeachment and giving the representative body the in- 
iative in matters of revenue, were fought out in England and 
found ready acceptance in America. The English common law 
remained in force in all the colonies. 

It will be observed from what has been said that there is little 
in the Constitution that is new. This does not detract from the 
credit of the framers. They had differences to reconcile and com- 
promises such as the Connecticut compromise and the three- fifths 
compromise were necessary. In forming a federation they had 
no chart to guide them. It is to their lasting credit tnat they 
framed a constitution which made possible a centralized govern- 
ment without destroying local self-government. 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



7 



To sum up then, we would say that the American Constitu- 
tion is deep-rooted in the past ; that many of the principles are 
English in origin, changed and corrected by colonial experience; 
that the Supreme Court and such features as are necessary for a 
federation are original ; and that the written constitution has its 
origin in America. 



We are confronted with the lamentable fact that much is spoken 
and written today which either contains no idea, or, containing 
it, fails to impart the meaning to the hearer or reader. That which 
contains no idea deserves no comment, as we all know there has 
been, and ever will be, a certain class of people who talk just for 
the sake of talking and string together on paper long meaningless 
groups of words, at which they can idiotically gaze with complai- 
sant satisfaction. We can usually recognize the talker from afar 
off. Sometimes, however, he has the opportunity to speak in 
public ; and, if we are so unfortunate as to be among the audience, 
etiquette compells us to endure it to the end. Aside from this 
torture, the annoyance, they are able to inflict upon us, is very 
small indeed. 

Brit there is another class of unfortunates. There are people 
who have splendid ideas — ideas, which would make the hearers and 
readers happier and wiser, but, when they attempt to express their 
ideas, they seem ineffectual, or, if they produce any effect, it may 
be just the opposite of the one desired. Many well disposed peo- 
ple are almost despised because they have at times failed to make 
themselves understood. 

This is a bad state of affairs for the twentieth century to see ; 
but, it is recognized and lamented by all thinking people. Oh ! 
the shameful familiarity of that long word misunderstanding. Who 
has not had occasion to wish that it, with the notion it represents, 
could be blotted out of the universe? Of all God's creation, 
humanity alone is endowed with reason, yet, in spite of this, mis- 
understanding is one of man's distinguishing attributes. 

Man has reason ; he has ideas ; but, he has more ; he has also 
the power to impart these ideas to a fellow creature and receive 



H. H. Shenk, A. B. 



fllMeunfcerstanMnGe. 



8 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



his ideas in return. It is in this process of exchange that the 
misunderstanding takes place. 

You go to your class room with your lesson well prepared. 
You are called upon to recite. You stand and say what you can. 
The class roars with laughter and the "Prof." credits you with a 
zero. Again, you think you have made arrangements to take a 
lady to a popular lecture. The time comes and that honor is con- 
ferred upon another. These are misunderstandings. Can they be 
prevented? At any rate, let us suppose they can and then prove 
it a posteriori. Let us, suppose we are not dealing with people who 
never give attention to what is being said, nor yet, with those who 
intentionally deceive. 

The next time you have a talk with a friend (or an enemy), 
when his eyes meet your own, just think: Here I am, a mind, a 
soul, a spirit, hidden in this organized mass called the body, in 
direct communication with a creature similar to myself, who 
knows absolutely nothing of me and of whom I know absolutely 
nothing, except, by and thru language of some kind. You ex- 
change your thots. He goes his way a part of you, and you go 
yours a part of him. If there has been a misunderstanding, your 
relations can never be the same again, for while future explanation 
may relieve, it cannot cure. And yet when you were talking with 
him, you had the conviction that, by your mutual consent, your 
ideas could have been clearly expressed and understood by means 
of language, if you had taken the time for it. 

Thus we arrive at one of the causes, viz : Carelessness. We 
say we were hurried by circumstances — not very complimentary 
to your friend, if he is of such minor importance, when compared 
with the affair to which you were hurrying, that you could leave 
him in a worse frame of mind than he was before you talked to him . 
If you wish to economize time, far better spend'alittlemore in the 
conversation and a little less afterward, when the worry over the 
whole affair makes the "nights sleepless and the days a dream." 

You may have taken ample time for your talk. What is now 
your excuse for the misunderstanding? "Oh!" you say, "I could 
not find words to express my ideas." Is our language then so 
barren ? There are those English speaking people who compro- 
mise their own language by comparing its expressive power with 
that of other tongues. They think it fashionable to get a little 
German, etc., and then condemn the very language thru which 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



9 



they get every meaning for their new language ! 

Don't take my word that our noble language is the best in,ex- 
istence but, hear Mcintosh : "Here is a language (English) marked 
by terseness and clearness, by soberness and majesty, by sweet- 
ness and fullness of expression never surpassed and rarely equaled . ' ' 
That excuse, then, does not stand and we are enabled to deduce 
the second cause, viz : Poor selection of words. To be more logical, 
we might express it in a different way : the use of words, which 
do not perfectly represent the notion wished to be imparted, as the 
vehicle for our thots. 

What might that word vehicle suggest? Let us see. "A 
vehicle is that by means of which any thing is communicated or 
conveyed," and, as a wagon absorbs some of the force necessary 
to draw the load, so the word absorbs some of the vitality of our 
idea ; so that, the word, which represents perfectly our idea to us, 
will not alone convey that idea in its entire and perfectly pure 
significance to another. This is a difficulty which can be more 
than counteracted by the silent language and silent, tho they 
are actions speak louder than words. We feel the influence of 
the silent language every day. You meet people on the street 
who speak to you, wishing you "good morning" in a tone of voice 
and expression of face, which tells you that, if the truth were 
known, they really wish you a bad morning. 

It seems to be one of the social edicts, that people of good taste 
shall veil their individuality and become like the emotionless 
model set up for us to imitate. When we have suppressed every 
natural tendency and have assumed actions, which make us feel 
like idiots, we are pronounced ladies and gentlemen. 

We can finally conclude that the third cause is : The neglect 
and abuse of the silent language. If the signs of your silent lan- 
guage are not your own, you are somebody else, and, if you ever 
gain any credit by being somebody else, it is no credit to you. 

If one chooses to "sit like his grandsire, cut in alabastic," do 
not try to convert him if that is his natural attitude. If another 
choose to shout and scream, double himself up, and get black and 
blue in the face about every little thing which seems laughable to 
him, let him enjoy himself, he is being natural. These are ex- 
treme cases, but we must have the freaks to enable us to appre- 
ciate the ordinary people. 

Then, be natural, whatever the cost, and don't go thru the 



10 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



world a living deception. Let the heart, the mind, the soul, speak 
thru the hand, the eye, the expression of face, and the action, as 
well as thru the tongue and pen. And we may be sure, if we avoid 
these three causes, misunderstandings will be rare things in our 
experience. 

Feu Foixet. 

"A 

Copper Deposits in IRortbern flDtcbiaan, 

{Continued from last number.) 

Between the amygdaloid belts occur beds of conglomerate 
varying from friable to hard and compact, and composed of rather 
large or small rounded pebbles. The interstitial material con- 
sists of smaller particles held together by siliceous and calcareous 
cement ; the copper, when any is present, occupies mainly these 
interstitial spaces between the pebbles and is sometimes found de- 
placing the cement altogether. The union of these masses is very 
firm. A stroke of a hammer does not sever their connection, but 
breaks the mass straight thru the pebbles, except where the inters- 
titial spaces are occupied by copper. A large portion of the peb- 
bles consists either of a reddish brown, compact, homogeneous, 
silico — felspathic substance or are porphyritic, with smooth con- 
choidal fracture. However, these vary largely in composition. 
It may be remarked here that the Calumet & Hecla, the richest 
copper mine, is situated on a conglomerate of exceptional opulence. 

Latter day copper mines divide their products into three 
classes, known as mass, barrel, and stamp copper. The masses 
are sometimes of enormous size, two having been found which 
weighed over five hundred tons each, and were worth, at the time 
of their discovery, nearly one half million dollars each. Barrel 
copper consists of small masses of copper weighing from a few 
pounds upward to a size rendering them too large for the barrels 
when they are called masses. The stamp copper is produced from 
the rock after crushing the rock to sand, and varies from nuggets 
of some small size to microscopic flakes so light as to be lost in 
the tailings of the stamp mills because their minute size renders 
them independent of the law of gravitation. 

The mining shafts of the copper district are the deepest in the 
world. The Red Jacket vertical shaft of the Calumet & Hecla, 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



one of the greatest copper mines in the world, is 4,900 feet in 
depth. The temperature of the rocks at the bottom of this shaft, 
is 87.6 degrees. Fortunately, this temperature is reduced some- 
what by the use of compressed air in running the power drills, so 
that the miners are enabled to work in fair comfort at this great 
depth below the earth's surface. Two shafts of the Tamarac 
average 4,650 feet in depth. These three, the deepest shafts on 
the globe, are within one-half mile of each other, and on the same 
lode. The Tamarac is now sinking a shaft to be completed in 
1901, and will be a full mile, or over, in depth. The Calumet & 
Hecla has one shaft 5,370 feet in depth — ninety feet more than a 
mile — but as this is sunk on the angle of the lode, on an incline 
of 37^ degrees, it does not begin to reach the same vertical dis- 
tance below the earth's surface as the shaft previously named. 
These are pre eminently the deepest mines in the district, and in 
each case there is an aggregate of about forty miles of shafts, slopes 
and underground passages. In all the other mines of the district 
the depths are 4000 feet or less. From these deepest shafts the 
products are hauled by monster engines of two thousand horse- 
power or more, and at a rate of speed a little less than that of an 
average express train on a horizontal plane. In the above men- 
tioned Red Jacket shaft is a hoisting engine of eight thousand 
horsepower. 

The rock material containing the smaller masses of copper, 
after being brought to the surface is carried to the stamp mills, 
where the rock is crushed into sand, then washed so as to allow 
the copper to sink to the bottoms of the washers while the sand is 
carried away on account of the difference in specific gravity. Of 
stamp mills the Calumet & Hecla is most complete. It uses 
twenty-two of these titans, each striking blow, of thousands of foot- 
tons and grinding the refractory conglomerate, hard as granite, in- 
to sand, which is partially soluble in water, at the rate .of three 
hundred tons each daily. 

(To be continued.) 

3unior IRbetoncal. 

The Second Division of the Junior class held its public rhe- 
torical on Saturday evening, February 17. The audience, which 
had assembled, was highly pleased with the exercises. The sub- 
jects of the orations were aptly chosen and were handled in a man- 



12 THE COLLEGE FORUM. 

ner that reflects much credit upon the Juniors. The program 
was as follows : — 

INVOCATION. 
PIANO— Valse Impromptu, Brull. 
Ruth Leslie. 

Plus Ultra, R. R. Butterwick. 

Truth Conquers, S. E- Rupp. 

A Departed Guest, Sue Moyer. 

America's Aspiration, T. F. Miller. 

VOCAL, — Rose Queen of Flowers, Spohr. 

Ljllie Kreider. 
False Ambition, H. H. Yohe. 

International Arbitration, W. S. Roop. 

The Other Side of the Question, Helen I. Shank. 
Man His Own Star, C. W. Waughtel. 

PIANO— Valse, Chopin. 

Charles Oldham. 
Man Wanted, A. G. Smith. 

The Value of Fiction, D. M. Oyer. 

Superstition a Greater Bane Than Skepticism, 
W. O. Roop. 

DUET— Overture, Schubert. 
Anna Kreider and Reba Lehman. 

In the account of the first Junior rhetorical, given in the 
February number of the Forum, there should have appeared on 
the program the name of L. E. Cross who, at that time, delivered 
an oration on the subject, "One Side of the Question." Who is 
directly responsible for this omission, we are not able to ascertain. 
The editors of the Forum regret the error very much and assure 
that it was wholly unintentional. It will hot be out of place to 
remark, in this connection, that the subject, "The Other Side of 
the Question," which appears on the program above, was the ex- 
press counterpart to Mr. Cross" subject. All who heard both 
sides discussed will likely agree, that the question appears to be a 
fairly balanced one. 



Ibelen IReefc String Quartette. 



The last entertainment of the course, as outlined for the year, 
was given by the Helen Reed String Quartette, on the evening of 
February 19. The people expected a treat from this famous band 
of musicians and the Chapel was consequently crowded. That 
the performances met the approval of the audience, was fully veri- 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



13 



fied by the way in which they were received, nearly every num- 
ber being heartily encored. The entertainers showed that they 
were fully in love with their art and sought to entertain with that 
alone. The instruments were the harp, mandola, mandolin, banjo, 
and violin. There accompanied the quartette, Miss Nell Ames 
Horr, the Reciter, who performed a very pleasing part in the en- 
tertainment. 

E>r. Iking. 

The last number in the course of lectures and entertainments, 
as outlined in the fall, was the Concert by the "Helen Reed String 
Quartette." Through the efforts of the committee, the name of 
Dr. Byron W. King, of Pittsburg, was later added to the list of 
our entertainers, and all who had the pleasure of hearing him, 
when he was with us, on the evening of March 8th, recognize the 
wisdom of the committee in securing him. We would not at- 
tempt, by any remarks, to add to the reputation of Dr. King, but 
will say that he fully sustained his reputation among the students 
and friends of Lebanon Valley College. The self-control and per- 
fect self culture which he manifests is not only entertaining, but 
inspiring. No matter how old or how oft repeated a selection 
may be, it becomes new when rendered by Dr. King. 

£oap*Bubble fl>art£. 

The members of the Clioniau Literary Society entertained the 
members of the Philokosmian and Kalozetean literary societies at 
a soap-bubble party, held in the Ladies Hall, on the evening of 
February 2 1 . The occasion was one highly enjoyed by all present. 
Games and soap-bubble making were the chief amusements of the 
evening. The Philos and Kalos duly appreciate the kindness and 
hospitality shown them by their Clio friends. 

IReception to 3untor6. 

On Saturday evening, March 3, President and Mrs. Roop en- 
tertained the members of the Junior Class at their home on College 



14 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Avenue. The evening was spent in a most delightful manner. 
Humorous selections were recited by C, W. Waughtel and T. F. 
Miller. Mrs. Roop favored the guests with a solo and Miss Susie 
Moyer rendered a number of selections on the piano. A. G. Smith 
in a short address, returned the thanks of the class to Dr. and Mrs. 
Roop for their hospitable entertainment. 

IDocee moctte. 

The authorities of the college promise faithfully that the new 
Music Hall will soon be completed. Boughter recently had his 
hair cut, so that the plasterers will be able to begin their work in 
a few days. 

Roudy. — "Hello 'Fat,' they tell me you have quite a head- 
ache." "How is your head?" 
Fat. — "Oh, its on the hog." 

Prof. D , — (In Latin.) "Don't useapony; I never used 

one in all my college course. There was only one pupil in our 
class who had one, and he got a black eye." 

Seibert, — "Did the pony kick him?" 

This sign was one time seen in front of a grocery store: 
"In God we trust, 
All others cash." 

Two conscientious young ladies of the dormitory were one 
evening reverently kneeling by the bed to say their prayers, when 
they suddenly spied a pony before them. 

R — , (Very much chagrined) "I'll put it in the table drawer. ' ' 
N — , "Oh! no, don't! The poor thing ; we have ridden him 
so hard that his sharp bones might wound ycu in the knee." 

a senior's soliloquy. 
In Science of Rhetoric, we're bound for a test, 

In Moral Philosophy and all of the rest ; 
In the dread of flunk, in the tug for a grade, 

Let this be.your motto, "Go lie in the shade;" 
For whether professor is watching or not. 

The victor is he who uses his trot. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



15 



Prof. S ,— (In H. of Civilization ,) "What did the burn- 
ing of the Bull of excommunication by Luther, mean to medieval 
civilization ?" 

W--r, — "An ox roast." 

One beautiful evening after Dr. King had thrilled a large 
audience in the Chapel with his eloquence and rich humor, two 
happy couples were patiently waiting for the trolley, when one of 
the gentlemen, Mr. C-w---g, overflowing with rapture in the 
midst of the silvery moonlight and pleasant surroundings ; gave 
vent his feelings in a few startling and carressing stanzas of poetry. 

"Espy, ' ' — Delighted — You seem to have received inspiration. 

Mr. C , Quite satisfied — Yes. 

"Espy," — you should often come out in the moonlight. 

Miss D 1, Sadly — O, there are not enough of lectures. 

Boys be gallant and remember a lost opportunity is as the 
fleecy snowflake falling into a lake of disappointment, and memory 
hopelessly searches for the quivering smiles forever asleep in an 
ocean of regret. 

Clto motes. 

Another month of work is gone and we look back with glad- 
ness, when we think how we were favored during the month. 

Our joint session with our brother Philos was very much en- 
joyed by all, and our session with the Kalos, at which an "Edu- 
cational Program" was rendered, was very instructive. 

We were also favored in having Mr. Schlichter and Mr. Shenk 
with us, February 23. They both made short addresses which 
were very much enjoyed. We appreciate the interest our instruc- 
tors take in us not only in the class room but also in our Society 
work. Thesev isits and speeches are very encouraging to us as 
workers. 

A tour joint session with the Kalos, the following visitors were 
present: Misses Vallerchamp and Shank, Messrs Oldham, Esben- 
shade, Burde, Kreider, Brownmiller and Rev. Spayd of York. 

The Society sympathizes with Miss and Mr. Burtner on ac- 
count of the death of their father. 

Lillian G. Kreider, '00. 



i6 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Ikalo motee. 

With the close of another school term the official management 
of the society is passing into new hands. On Friday evening 
March 9th, the election of officers for the ensuing term took place. 
The election resulted as follows :— President, W. J. Sanders, '02; 
Vice President, L. E. Cross, '01 ; Recording Secretary, C. A. 
Fisher, '03; Corresponding Secretary, C. E. Roudabush, '03; 
Chaplin, D. D. Buddinger, '02 ; Censor, A. G. Smith, 'oi ; Editor 
of K. L. S. Examiner, C. R. Engle, '02; and Sergeant- at- Arms, 
H. F. Rhoad, '03. The writer urges the Kalos to join hands with 
the newly elected officers and become willing and obedient servants 
to them in carrying forward the ensign, "Palma non sine pulvere." 

As a foretaste to the members and friends of K. L S. who 
expect to be present at its Anniversary exercises on April 6th. the 
committee on music reports that the famous Lebanon Banjo Club 
will furnish the music on that occasion. We welcome into our 
midst once more our friend J. W. Turnbaugh. 

The K. L. S. has decided to render a humorous play in the 
College Chapel some time during the Spring term. Strenuous ef- 
forts are being put forth by the participants therein to render this 
play in such a manner as to be both instructive and entertaining 
to the auditors and reflect a lasting credit upon the work of the 
Society . 

The Editor would do an injustice to the readers of these notes 
if he would not report the success of the joint meeting held by the 
C. L. S. and K. L. S. on the 9th hist. All who were present de- 
clared it to be a literary treat and success. 

We are fastly nearing the close of the winter term and the ef- 
forts, put forth by the Kalos this term, have been more creditable 
and satisfactory than in any preceding term. However there is 
still room for improvement. Beyond lies Utopia. The outlook 
for K. L- S. is very promising. Every member of K. L. S. should 
realize that effort is the soul of greatness. 

Editor. 

pbtlo motes. 

As we gaze in retrospect upon the term which is fast ap- 
proaching its close and which will soon be a part of the irrevocable 
past, we look with just pride upon the achievements we have 



I 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. , 7 

made ; yet, what grander results might we have obtained if we 
had but been prepared for every engagement that crossed our path. 
As we look backward over the past twelve weeks, the ghosts of 
innumerable unimproved opportunities rise up to condemn us. 
Here a good word unspoken, there a kind deed undone, yesterday 
a lesson but half prepared, and today a task neglected, are only so 
many opportunities that will never again come our way and are 
but evidence that for some reason we were not prepared for an 
emergency . 

But, turn from retrospect to prospect. What of the illimitable 
future! The past cannot be improved. This day alone is ours. 
Let us make each today, as it conies, better than each yesterday, 
looking forward to the tomorrows with the hope and with the 
earnest desire that we may be better prepared to live and to meet 
the emergencies as they come upon us, than we were yesterday. 
Take a firm stand for better things, determine to embrace every 
opportunity, and improvement and success will follow. 

We hope to see many new faces among our number at the 
beginning of the new term. To those who would come within the 
walls of our dear old college, with a desire to make the most of 
the time, labor, and money expended, we would say, do not forget 
that the Literary society is a very important factor in accomplishing 
that end. To have discovered the truth is a very good thing but 
being able to declare the truth is far nobler. In the literary so- 
ciety is where that power can be cultivated. 

A welcoming hand is always extended in Philo hall, and we 
most heartily welcome any one who may desire to labor with us. 

J. Walter Esbenshade, '03. 



An interesting joint session of the Y. W. C A. and Y. M. C. 
A. was held on Sunday afternoon, March 4, in the College Chapel. 

The meeting was presided over by Mr. Spessard. Rev. Good 
gave an interesting talk on Y. M. C. A. work. The report of the 
State Y. M. C. A. convention at Williamsport was given by the 
delegates, Mr. Cowling and Mr. Light. The Association is to be 
commended for sending delegates who so satisfactorily reported 
the proceedings of the convention. The weekly meetings of the 



1 8 THE COLLEGE F< 

Y. M. C. A. continue to be well attendt 
recently been added to the list of active 

"A 

atbletics. 



The prospects for a successful base ball season are very bright. 
The candidates are manifesting an interest which warrants the as- 
sertion that there will be considerable rivalry for the positions on 
the team. 

The season will be opened with a game with Ursinus College, 
at Collegeville, April 7 . Games have been scheduled for the home 
grounds as follows: April 13, Yale Law School; April 21, the 
Indians; April 28, Franklin and Marshall ; May 19, Ursinus. 
Games are also scheduled with Delaware State College, Pennsyl- 
vania Military College, and Hill School. 

On the evening of Washington's Birthday, a very pleasing 
entertainment was given by the Athletic Association. The exer- 
cises consisted of recitations, music, and athletic performances. 
The interest in athletics was shown, on this occasion, by the pat- 
ronage, not only of the college students but also of the citizens of 
Annville. 

alumni et alumnae. 



' 7 8. 

Rev. C. A. Burtner, Ph. D., of Harrisburg, died at his home 
March 6th. He was a native of Breathedsville, Md. ; the son 
oi Ezra Burtner who died one year ago. The funeral services 
were conducted at Harrisburg and Annville. Rev. Spayd, of York , 
Pa., officiated at Annville, after which the interment was made in 
the Annville Cemetery. His wife and two children, Madie and 
Rene, survive. Both his son and daughter are prominent and 
highly esteemed members of the Senior class of Lebanon Valley 
College. 

Rev. Burtner graduated at L. V. C. in 1878 and was married 
on the day of graduation to Miss Clara Light of Annville. 

He served as an influential minister in the U. B. Church and, 
since the time of graduation, was a member of the Pennsylvania 
Conference. 



veral names have 



I 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



19 



He served a number of important charges ; among them, York 
2nd chuich, Scott St. church, Baltimore, Md., and Otterbein 
church, Harrisburg, Pa., from September 1897 until the time of 
his death. 

He was Presiding Elder of the Baltimore district of Pennsyl- 
vania Conference from 1894 to 1897. In 1897, ne was elected a 
member of the U. B. Seminary Board, and also a member of the 
Board of Trustees of Lebanon Valley College. He was also co- 
editor, with Dr. Albright, of the "True Believer" for a number 
of years. 

We mourn the death of Rev. Burtner as a man of God, faith- 
ful and energetic in the performance of all his duties. He was 
profoundly interested in the progress of the Church, with her var- 
ious institutions, and shall ever remain in our memories as a loyal 
and devoted son of L. V. C. 

: *8i. 

C. E. Rauch, President of the Lebanon Y. M. C. A., was one 
of the active participants in the recent State Y. M. C. A. conven- 
tion. 

'90. 

W. H. Kindt has been stationed by the Evangelical Associa- 
tion at Shoemakersville, Pa. 

'90. 

E. S. Bowman represented the Mechanicsburg Y. M. C. A. 
at the State Convention. 

'99- 

Miss Bess Landis, Rev. H. E. Miller and I. E. Runk visited 
the college recently. 

'99- 

Carrie E. Seltzer entertained some of her classmates and 
friends on the evening of February 26th, at her home in Lebanon. 

Xocals. 

The joint session of the P. L. S. and C. L. S. took place on 
the evening of the 23rd ultimo. The evening was spent on short 
stories, their authors and place in modern literature. 



20 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Messrs G. D. Light, 'oo and D. J. Cowling, '02, attended the 
State Y. M. C. A. convention, held at Williamsport, as delegates 
from the college Y. M. C. A. 

Mr. W. O. Roop, '01, has received a quarterly conference 
license to preach. We bid him God speed. 

President Roop attended the opening of the law school of the 
University of Pennsylvania on the 21st and 22nd of February. 

Mr. R. D. Burtner and his sister, Miss Madie Burtner, both 
of the class of '00, were called home on the 5th inst. on account 
of the illness of their father, the Rev. C. A. Burtner, which re- 
sulted in his death. The student body tenders its hearty sympa- 
thy to them. 

Mr. J. W. Turnbaugh, who had to quit his studies last term 
on account of his eyes, is again with us. 

Exchanges. 

Several of our exchanges failed to appear last month. After 
the exchange editor has examined the papers, they are placed in 
the reading room of Lebanon Valley College where they can be 
read by the students. Some of the college publications are full of 
interest and we are sorry that they do not appear regularly in our 
exchange list. The following February exchanges have been 
received: — Otterbein Aegis, Conienian, Mercersburg Monthly, Hed- 
ding Graphic, Gates Index, Anchor, College Folio, Undergraduate , 
Lesbian Herald, High School Times, Pennsylvania Herald, Erskinian, 
Porcupine, Watchword, Blue and Gold, Emerson College Magazine, 
Dickinsonian , Juniata Echo, Mirror, Ursinus College Bulletin, 
Western Maryland College Monthly, Philalethean , Gettysburg Mer- 
cury, Indian Helper, and The Red and Blue. 

There seems to be a disposition on the part of some of the ex- 
change editors to complain when their paper is criticised. We 
must be willing to endure criticism as well as give it. Any care- 
ful reader of the exchange departments of the college publications 
will say that the criticisms are usually just and also very rare. 
When there are from twenty-five to thirty exchanges received each 
month it is impossible to examine all of them thoroughly, but we 
always look through them and will endeavor to mention those that 



I 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



21 



attract our attention either by their excellence or by their imper- 
fections. 

The Erskinian, fromDue West, S. C, comes to us full of good 
things. "A Flying Trip to the Moon" certainly illustrates the 
imaginative power. 

The Porcupine contains several exceptionally good editorials. 

The Gettysburg Mercury and the Philalethean should both have 
an exchange department. 

The Dayton High School Times is one of the best High School 
papers we have seen. It compares favdrably with many college 
publications. 

We enjoyed the "Glimpse of Lake George'' in The Under- 
graduate. 



If you want to Buy a Hat Right, and a 
Right Hat, or anything in 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS, 

»™ Erb & Craumer, 

8th and Cumberland Sts. 
LEBANON, - - - PA. 

L. Y. C. QUARTETTE 

COMPOSED OF 

H. E. Spessard, 

S. D. Kaufman, 

W. S. Roop, 

C. R. Engle, 
H. L. Eichinger, Elocutionist, 

a strong concert company well pre- 
pared to give first class "entertain- 
ments. 

Y. M. C, A., 

C. E. SOCIETY, 

CHURCH 

wishing a good entertainment can- 
not do better than to engage the 
L. V. C. Quartette. 

For terms, dates, etc., address the 
manager, 

H- L. Eichinger, ' 

flnnville, Pa. 



Over 60 Weaver Organs 




ARE IN USE IN 
THE 



Public Schools 



Baltimore. 



They were adopted after a severe con- 
test in comparison with six otrjer 
maKes of organs of the highest 
grade. 



Write direcr to us for Catalogue and Frices 

WEAYER ORGAN and PIANO CO. 

....MANUFACTURERS.... 

YORK, PA. 

H.S. WObpT 

—DEALER IN— . 

Green Groceries 

and Confections. 

Restaurant in connection! 



Stephen Hubertis 

1 1 25 and 1 127 North Third St., 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Blank Book Manufacturer 

and JOB BOOK BINDER. 



Ruling, 
Numbering, 



Wire 
Stitching. 



Harry Light 

Books anb 
Stationery 



3? 



22 East Main Street, 
Annville, Pa. 



New, seoond-hand aud shelf worn 
COLLEGE TEXT 
BOOKS. 

STATIONERY, 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES. 

Students' Supplies a Specialty. 

West^ndTstore^ 5 ^^ 



General 



Merchandise 

Shoes and Gent's Furnishing Goods 
a Specialty. 

.34-136 West Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

i860 1885 
J. HENRY MILLER, 

General Insurance Agent, 

S. W. Cor. 8th and Willow, 

LEBANON, PA. 

ALL COMPANIES FIRST-CLASS. 

E. B. MARSHALL, M. D 

NO. 34 EAST MAIN STREET, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

ESTABLISHED 1851. 

Theo Leonardt & Son 

LITHOGRAPHERS, 

5th and Liberty Sts., PHILA.. 



Diplomas and Certificates of 
riembership. 
Commercial Work our Specialty. 



SHENK & KINPORTS., 

ANNVILLE, PA, 
Dealers in l\rj GOOdS, NOtiOnS, 
and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a specialty. 
Home made, Ingrain and Brussels Carpets 
You buy Cheaper from us than away- irom 
home, a'nd have a large stock to select from 



J. G. GARMAIM, 

Livery Attached. E. Main St. 

JOSEPH MILLER, 

Furniture & Undertaking. 

ANNVILLE, PA.^ 

}n£. C. MOOLF, 

Notions, Groceries, Etc. 

62 East Main St. 



3* 



Sheffey's Furniture Store, 

Cor. Main and 

White Oak Street. 
Undertaking A Specialty . 

~jos7~a71smith , 

Hardware, Plain, . . . 

Stamped & Japanned Ware. 
ANNVILLE, - - PA. 

"jT^Tkendig, 
B • TK • K • E • R 

Next Door to Hotel Eagle. 
Harry Zimmerman, D. D. S. f 

Dental IRooms, 

72 W. Main St. ANNVILLE, J>A- 

The Northwestern Mutual Lifj 
Insurance Co., of Milwaukee, Wis. 

R. A. MAULFA1R, Gen. Agt , 

ANNVILLE, FA. 

All the latest and best policies issued. 

7V\. H. SH7*UD, 

• — DEALER IN— • 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

FINE «» AND 
CANDIES V FRUITS. 

Families supplied with OYSTERS. 



TH£ COLLEGE FORUM. 



Vol. XIII. 



APRIL, 1900. 



No. 2. 



STAFF: 

Galen D". Light, 'oo, Editor-in-Chief. 
ASSOCIATE : 

Harry E.Spessard, 'oo. Alfred C. T. Sumner, '02. • 

Henry H. Baish, '01. Charles W. Christman, '03. 

BUSINESS MANAGERS: 
S. F. Daugherty, 'oi, Chief. 
H. h. Kichinger, '03, Assistant. W. C. Arnold, '03, Assistant'. 

Tin: COLLEGE FbjRtfM is published monthly by the Philokosmian Uterary Society 
of Lebanon Valley College. 

The College Forum will be forwarded to all subscribers until an order is received for 
its discontinuance, and all arrearages have been paid. Address all business, commuuica; 
tious to S. F. Daugherty, Business Manager, Box 184, Annville,"Pa. 

All matter intended for the Forum should be submitted to the Editorial Staff not later 
than the 15th of the month preceeding its appearance in the Forum's columns. 

TERMS : — fifty Cents Per Year. Single Copy, 10 Cts. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as second-class mail matter. 



EDITORIAL. 



cj^^m In the life of individuals and nations 

^ ^ youth is the time of observation, of aggress - 

- iveness, of original thought, all of which 

JEnfcUVC? are characteristic of healthy growth, while 
age is the period of meditation, of dreaming, of peace-loving 
habits, 'and lack of enterprise, and these are just as characteristic 
of decline and decay. According to this, England does not seem 
to have lost any of the elements of vigorous youth nor to show 
signs of approaching decline in her policy in South Africa. 
While that policy may not be in accordance with our American 
ideas of justice, yet one cannot fail to see in it all the cool-headed 
business man. Commerce is ever aggressive and England is pre- 
eminently a commercial nation. Her policy, therefore, is but an 
exemplification of the principle that prevails in the whole busi- 
ness world, in fact, in all life on earth. It is but a question of 
taking advantage of the weakness of a fellow-heing and . the: law 
of the survival of the fittest, like a pall, overhangs it all, much as 
we may lament it. As soon as a business concern ceases to be 
aggressive and enterprising so soon will it cease to be successful 



23 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



although it may continue to do business still. As soon as a na- 
tion ceases to be aggressive, ceases to be a nation of fighters, so 
soon will the ferment of decay be infused into its life-blood. 
England's aggressiveness and enterprise, then, disclaims conclu- 
sively that she is in her decline. 



* , * 



Never before in the history of our beloved 
institution could so many, bright, intelligent 
countenances be seen in the college chapel 
XTcrnt. as at t he opening of this term. It is indeed 
gratifying to all interested in the college, especially to those who 
have the direct supervision, to see their efforts so richly rewarded. 
New students, we welcome you heartily into our midst and sin- 
cerely hope that your association with us may be of a most edify- 
ing character. But not only has there been a large increase in 
attendance, but there is also a marked activity along other lines. 
The literary societies are putting forth strenuous efforts to win the 
new students, the base ball season has been opened admirably, the 
work at the Conservatory resumed, and the large annex begun. 
He who comes to breathe the atmosphere of our college will de- 
tect in it the element of intense activity along every line, in har 
mony with nature which now is actively at work unfolding 
herself. 



The desire to attain a certain end with 
College the least possible exertion is, in itself, per- 

JExatTUnatlOnS. fectfy right and natural, and it is always 
sure to lead to profitable results when asso- 
ciated with that judgment and knowledge which is able to deter- 
mine how much work is necessary to reach the end - in view. It 
must be guarded, however, lest we be actuated, not by a desire to 
accomplish a certain result with the least necessary work, but to 
accomplish it simply with little work. The latter condition often 
obtains and we believe it is largely responsible for the somewhat 
prevalent sentiment against college examinations. That, examin- 
ations, whether in the public schools or in the colleges, entail a 
great deal of work, especially for the teacher, it requires no effort 
to prove. That they entail more work than is necessary, in other 
words, that they can be profitably dispensed with, has not yet been 



I 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



24 



proved. In fact, if we are to judge from the experiments tried 
in the public schools of some of the boroughs of our country, 
the opposite is true, namely, that to dispense with the system 
of examinations is to ruin the schools. Examinations commend 
themselves, not only as reviews for the students and as tests 
upon which teachers may base their marks,' reasons which are 
generally given, but also as a course of mental discipline and 
as a means by which students are led to pursue their studies with 
a purpose. If a system of examinations, difficult in proportion to 
the branches taught, be made a part of the term's work, it cannot 
help but make the student feel, to a greater or less degree, that he 
is held responsible for the matter gone over, and study will not 
be pursued simply for the sake of recitation. Moreover, such a 
system ought to be an incentive to the teacher. If he expects the 
student to be master of the work gone over in the class room , so 
thoroughly master of it that he can pass a creditable examination 
on it, two, three, or probably six months after, it is only right to 
say that his work should be characterized by profound thorough- 
ness. 

a Xtttle stufcs in mature. 



Ernest. — Edgar, there is no study like nature! 
Edgar. — Human nature? 

Er. — Indeed. No more favorable opportunity ever offered 
itself to an alert student. 

Ed. — To me the contrary seems. Judging from appearances, 
there is no need of study, because human nature is so liberally 
unmasked and verv self-evident. 

Er. — I am convinced that it is detrimental to one's self and a 
gross insult to the human race for any one to separate himself from 
the society which justly claims his powers and influence. 

Ed. — True, but while for a season one has buried himself in 
his books in search of precious gems of truth, is it not better to 
concentrate all the powers to that one thing, rather than to dis- 
tribute them and cause disquiet and longing for phantoms, which the 
alluring and transient pleasures of society offer and often produce? 

Er. — Vengeance upon the celibate ! His life is an accursed 
state. 

Ed. — It shall never be my fate. 



25 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Er. — Then let us throw oft these tyrant claims of servile in- 
difference and assert ourselves whenever an opportunity is open 
to strike a blow at all rascality, which makes social life odious. 

Ed. — My word upon it. And we no rascals will be. 

John. — Fellows, I am dissatisfied and incomplete in my pres- 
ent condition. I was never accustomed to such an abstract life 
at home. And what is more, I fee no necessity why we should 
attend these lectures with our own personality, when we might 
secure fairer company. 

Er. — We have already decided to break into Miss Etta's fold. 

Ed. — Another subject for human nature study. 

Jno. — But I am not acquainted with Miss Etta. I know not 
her temper. How dare I ask permission for a lady's company ? 

Er. — None knows her but to love her. Ed., does not your 
experience corroborate mine ? 

Ed. — Miss Etta, the guardian of the fair ones — we long for 
her majestic presence. Our hearts swell within us under her ra- 
diant smile of welcome. We admire, with calm delight, her won- ; 
derful charms. Among mortals she is a precious jewel — true 
woman. We love her most who know her best — A lamb — in 
Wolf(e)'s clothing. 

Er. — John, I have a request to make; you have always 
been a friend in whom I could put implicit trust. Understand, I 
must attend to important business, which necessitates my absence 
from college for several weeks after the holidays In the mean- 
time there will be a lecture to which I wish you would take my 
friend Elinor. If not for my sake, do it for her sake. 

Jno. — Ernest you have not misplaced your confidence, your 
interests are mine and I shall do all for you in so far as within 
me lieth. 

Er. — May my thanks suffice now — some day I will do you 
a favor. 

Jno. — Miss Elinor, pardon my forwardness, but to be 
frank, I have promised my friend Ernest, in his absence, to offer 
myself as a substitute in his stead to accompany you to the lec- 
ture, provided that the proposal meets your approbation. 

El. — Thanks for your mindfulness of me. It certainly 
affords me great pleasure to accept your generous proposition . 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 26 

Jno.— But, if Ernest should happen to return before the 
en time? 

El.— What of it! 

Jno. — Then shall we consider this as final? 
EL— Verily. 

s- 

if e El. — Why Ernest, I am so much surprised, I assure you 

Id agreeably, to see that you have returned earlier than you had an- 
ht ticipated ! Glad to see you back so soon. 

Er. — Thank you for your kind consideration. Fortune 
favored me beyond expectation and hence I was unabled to re- 
sume my duties here a week sooner. Before it escapes my mind, 
ot to change the subject, it occurs to me that only three days inter- 
vene between the time set for the lecture. Have you made ar- 
nr rangements for that evening, or did you wait for me? 

El. — I am very sorry, but I have already completed ar- 
or rangements. 
a- Er.— Did John? 

n- El.— He did. 

ie Er. — Well, but did he not explain ? Was it not a provis- 

in ional agreement pending on my returning? 

El. — I did not so understand . He considered the compact 
as final and so shall it be for this time. 
s Er. — Very well — au re voir. 

I 

:e 
1- 

y 



Hoffman. — I hear John and Ernest have worked a scheme 
on us. They purpose to take ladies to the lecture which will be 
a surprise to everyone. 

Ed. — Have we not sufficient dexterity to cope with them in 
[r this game ? Ha ! an excellent opportunity to show our prompt- 
ness in devising expedients. 

Hoff. — I've got it. I'll write to two ladies in the city and 
we'll show those fellows a thing or two. I will introduce you to 
a fine, accomplished young lady as a reputable Senior. I know 
you will suit her and she you. 
e Ed. — Bright idea. 



r 



Hoff. — I have received a reply from those ladies thru the 
morning mail and it is all right for us. 
Ed.— Good. 

Ed. — Chum, I have been thinking over this matter and 



2 7 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



have decided that it is not proper, neither just, to go "out of our 
own circle to bring ladies to an entertainment, when we have 
them fairer and more deserving at home. 

Hoff. — It is yet one day until the lecture, I will write to 
those ladies and inform them that you are sick with the "mumps"; 
that I am obliged to wait on you and therefore, with great regret, 
we are unable to fill our engagement ! 

Ed. — Excellent ! I will go immediately and seek for a 
companion. 

Jno. — I am astonished; I wouldn't treat a dog like you are 
those ladies. 

Ed. — You never knew me, if you thought I would go with 
a strange woman, whom I should see for the first time by night." 

Jno. — I was surprised when you consented to let your name 
go in that letter, in the first place. 

Hoff. — I have asked Ernest to go with me to the lecture, 
since he is taking no one himself. I left him under the impres- 
sion that he will come in the same seat with you and next to Con- 
stance. He now expects to entertain Constance and make it 
gloomy for you. 

Ed. — Will you do me a favor ? 

Hoff.— Certainly. 

Ed. — Will you exchange tickets with me? 
Hoff. — It is immaterial to me. 
Ed. — Do you know what you have done? 
Hoff. — What do you mean ? 

Ed. — John and Elinor have tickets nos. i and 2, row E in 
north aisle; Constance and I had nos. 4 and 3 in the same row. 
Thru our trade, John will be disappointed, because he thinks I 
will be in the same seat with him ; Ernest will probably be cha- 
grined to find himself in the seat beside Elinor, instead of realizing 
his hope of alienating Constance's attention from me. Just im- 
agine, Ernest on one side of Elinor and John on the other. 

Hoff. — Jeff Davis in a 'simmon tree! Yes, by Jupiter! That 
will be the best joke on those three I have ever heard. 

Ed. — He that lays a snare for another, falls in hinself. 

Hoff. — I will manage that Ernest and I get in our seat before 
John and Elinor come, lest Ernest see the situation and foil our 
plan in the last moment. 

Ed. — It must be done. 



1 



THE Cf v ; FORUM. 



28 



Ed. — Good morning, Ernest ! I hope you will forgive me my 
share in the scheming, which seems to have turned in our favor. 

Er. — My ire is kindled. How dare you thus accost me? I 
persist and relentless will be. Remember, my time is coming. 

Ed. — The joke is not all on you. It was a pretty sight to 
see Elinor looking intently toward the North pole as if she were 
watching for the Aurora, and you facing the South as tho you 
were in search of another light there. While you thus sat back 
to back in pensive, or perhaps indignant mood, the countenance 
of John seemed to indicate that he had surfeited himself with 
pickles at supper. And better yet, Elinor gave John the second 
and more impressive lecture last evening in the moonlight, think- 
ing that he and you had put up the trick on her. John insisted 
strenuously, that he was innocent. This morning I found him 
still angry and perplexed about the affair. He thinks you are not 
the man he always took you to be, since you audaciously compli- 
cated circumstances by procuring the seat next to Elinor, as he 
imagines you did. 

Er. — Let oblivion seize the whole business ! 

Ed. — Well Ernest, are you still a student of human nature? 

Er. — I am not actively engaged, however, I have taken a few 
lessons in the past three months. 

Ed. — I have noticed that John's interest in your interest has 
not diminished one iota during this time. He has taken Elinor 
to at least two lectures out of three since that eventful evening. 
It is a good thing to have a friend upon whom one can rely. I 
think you and I are now prepared to review this branch of human 
nature study with great significance. 

A. E. S. 

foot Ball. 

This is not the foot- ball season but, no doubt, every one in- 
terested in the welfare of Lebanon Valley will be pleased to know 
the prospects for next season. In the frontispiece, we give you a 
cut of the valiant men who battled for her honor on the gridiron 
during the season of '99. 

The season was a successful one and many times our brave 
warriors caused the "Blue and White" to wave in victorious tri- 



29 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



umph. True, they have been defeated, but by colleges in which 
foot-ball is not of so recent date, besides, some of the best men 
were not on the team until near the end of the season. Although 
foot-ball at L- V. C. has begun since the college has gotten out of 
its old rut and started on its upward course, yet its progress has 
been truly great and the prospects for the next season bid fair to 
measure favorably with any college of its size. 

All but one of the men on the cut intend to be candidates for 
the team next fall; besides, we expect some of the best material 
of the state among the new students. We expect to organize a 
strong second team which will have a schedule of its own. The 
manager is preparing a fine schedule of games for the varsity team 
with other colleges among which are the Carlisle Indians, Ursinus 
and Franklin and Marshall. A training table will be established 
at the opening of the season and the team will be put under the 
strictest discipline and coaching. 

In order that the readers may become better acquainted with 
each man of the team, we will give a few facts concerning some 
of them and regret that we do not have more space to devote to 
them. 

Captain C. A. Fisher, weight 155, an ever calm and collected 
quarter-back for two seasons, was unable to play in three of the 
games last season. W. J. Sanders, weight 140, creditably filled 
his position. The team's appreciation of Mr. Fisher was shown 
by re-electing him captain. 

T. W. Gray, weight 183, who successfully coached the team 
and played full-back, is a good athlete and a powerful line- bucker. 
An accident prevented him from playing in over half the games 
last season. Great things are expected of him next season. 

Seth Light, weight 156, a plucky little man, filled Mr. Gray's 
position. He graduates in June. We are sorry to lose him. 

W. S. Roop, weight 165, has played his position at right- 
tackle in every game since foot- ball began at L. V. C. and has 
never gone out of a game. He tackles all over the field. All op- 
posing teams remember Roop. Would that all players had the 
interest of foot-ball at heart as this man has. 

D. M. Oyer, weight 153, has filled the position at right-end 
since the start of foot-ball at L. V. C. He never says a word but 
quietly plays the game, being in every interferenc and the team 
never suffered from Davy not playing his part. 



oi- 
al 
a 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 30 

c k A. L. House, weight 167, the third member of L. V. C.'s 

611 team, was removed from his old position at centre to guard and, if 
his opponent did weigh 210 lbs., it mattered not to House. His 
°^ enthusiasm has never waned but sickness prevented him from 
as playing about half of last season. 

to R. S. Showers, weight 165, entered college near the middle 

of the season and had to learn the game, but his pluck and ability 
to punt the ball established him at left half- back. His prospects 
for next season are brilliant. 

S. E. Rupp, weight 162, left tackle, although his first season, 
held his position during the entire season. His strong point was 
m his ability to advance the ball through the other tackle. 
1S E M. Balsbaugh, weight 157, was only a Saturday student 

^ and did not have the advantage of daily practice. Ed. is a player 
ie at any position. We are elated over the fact that next season he 
will be in college. 

h J. A. Hershey, weight 175, was also a Saturday student but 

ie did excellent work for the team. His great strength, when prop- 

0 erly coached, will make him a star on the team. 

Isaac Loos, weight 150, our centre, was disabled in the F. 

d and M. game and A. W. Miller, weight 160, filled the position to 

Ie the end of the season in a manner to be commended. 

d Harry Raub, weight 180, and Charlie Shaffner, weight 185, 

11 who entered the game near the end of the season and played the 
guard positions in the last, three games, are two of the most prom- 

11 ising men in college. They have weight and speed. Unfortun- 
ately, Mr. Raub is not on the cut. 

s G. H. Albright, weight 132, and J. W. Balsbaugh, weight 

135, are two plucky boys. If they had the weight, they would be 

s two of L. V. C.'s stars. 

H. H. Yohe, weight 178, played right guard part of the sea- 
son. He held his position well and we were sorry that he did not 

s take part the entire season . 

C. W. Cowling, weight 155, and Claude Engle, weight 145, 

e and C. E. Roudabush, weight 135, were substitutes and will do 
good work next season . 

1 Student. 



"Love is blind, and lovers can not see 
The pretty follies that themselves commit." 



3i 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



pernicious literature. 



We may congratulate ourselves that we are living in a period 
of time unsurpassed for its literature, of which it truly can be said, 
"Of making books there is no end;" when literature is so cheap 
that every one can have his own library and when a home does 
not justify its name unless it has a good collection of wholesome 
books and periodicals. 

The literature of a people depicts its real life. In English 
literature one sees reflected the life of the English people in differ- 
ent ages. English writers disclose the fact that at one time the 
English people were libidinous, at another time, they were bigoted 
and, again, they were frivolous. American literature tells us that 
at the present day our people want to be pleased rather than in- 
terested and edified . 

Human character can be judged largely by the knowledge of 
the kind of literature that is read. Mark what an individual reads 
and you can tell his character. 

No one ever read good books continuously without becom- 
ing good. Neither did any one ever read bad books continuously 
without becoming morally impure. 

While our homes and schools are guarded carefully against 
every intrusion of vice, and our youths are led into paths of pleas- 
ant duty and rectitude by sweet and holy example, there are sub- 
tle and insidious foe£, over which there is but little control, that 
undo the character building of years. 

Some one has said, "Though we build solid walls and bur- 
nish them with gold, provide the highest degree of educational 
advantage, unless there shall be a wise defense of the morals of 
the young, especially the contagion and infection of criminal lit- 
erature, we build in vain." 

There is no sharper pain than that which lacerates a parent's 
heart when it is discovered that a beloved son or daughter has be- 
come corrupted by evil companionship or contaminated by impure 
literature. 

One of the most destructive agencies for the breaking down 
of youthful character and the demolition of virtue is the so-called 
literature which is allowed to enter into our homes, our school- 
rooms and even our colleges and universities. A questionable 
novel or criminal story becomes a silent companion to thought. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



32 



It quickens the imagination and arouses the passions without 
having the power to shock the sense of modesty as the personal 
presence of its author would. 

Our minds eat books as our bodies take in food. Wholesome 
food makes pure blood ; unwholesome food makes bad blood. A 
bad book is no more conducive to good character than diseased 
food is to healthy tissue. 

One of the forms of impure literature is the cheap half dime 
and dime novel, which disturbs the balance of sober thought and 
unsettles the aspirations for great and noble deeds. The chaplain 
of Newgate prison in London, in his annual report referred to 
many fine looking lads of respectable parentage, in the city prison, 
saying that these boys, without exception, had been in the habit 
of reading these cheap periodicals. There is no prison in Amer- 
ica where similar cases cannot be found. These novels and sto- 
ries are turned out by the ton, and read by thousands of American 
youths who will some time become active in the citizenship of our 
country. 

The dime novel seems to be the "victim" in literature. Some 
of our periodicals — weeklies and dailies — escape censure, though 
having columns packed with highly colored details of sickening 
and loathsome crimes. 

The attitude of the press towards deeds of crime should be 
that of a public censor. If crime is recorded at all, it should be 
the merest mention. As it is, if a saint dies, the intelligence, if 
properly paid for, may have two or three lines in a daily, while the 
criminal — the victim of the gallows — has column after column, 
under a captious heading, allotted to him. Added to the reading 
matter, are the finger- boards to destruction — the advertisements. 
Quack doctors, by the sanction of editors, pray upon the afflicted, 
assail virtue, and bid for lives of shame. The press assists crime 
instead of preventing it. 

The hope of society, of the nation, is bound up in the youth 
of our land and it is every one's duty to defend their morals. 

Good literature and good books of every kind have been a 
mighty influence in the past in the shaping of character. The in- 
spiration of a single book has made preachers, poets, philosophers, 
authors and statesmen. The trend of many a life for successor 
failure, has been determined by a single book. 

Ossian's poems affected Napoleon's life, and Cotton Mather's 



33 



THK COLLEGE FORUM. 



"Essays to do Good," Franklin's life. Ruskin's works taught 
Beecher the secret of seeing, while such books as Pilgrim's Prog- 
ress, Lives of Washington and Clay, and the Bible moulded the 
character of a Lincoln. 

The field of good literature is ever-widening, its limits are 
boundless, its pastures fresh , and beautiful flowers may be plucked 
everywhere. The poorest can revel in the wealth of intellect, 
with Plato and ^Socrates, or follow Caesar in his campaigns, or 
Alexander in his conquest of the world. 

The humblest boy may explore the wilds of Africa with Liv- 
ingstone or Stanley, or follow Napoleon over the battle fields of 
Europe. He may, with Galileo, explore the wide expanse of the 
heavens, or with Hugh Miller, read the story of the ages imprint- 
ed in the rocks. 

What wealth in the realm of good literature ! What need for 
that which only amuses or demoralizes ? Open the door of the li- 
brary in the home to good literature of every kind. Let our pub- 
lic libraries and reading rooms be supplied with that only which 
elevates the morals. When the desire of the youth is to read on- 
ly that which is beautiful and good, we shall no longer need to 
decry pernicious literature. 

Nemo . 

Gwo fl>atb6 tbat dross. 

Harry James and Frank Gordan were two young men who 
had been employed by Caton & Co,, one of the largest wholesale 
establishments in Richmond. The former took great interest in 
religious work and was truly a devout Christian, but the latter 
was the opposite, not wicked, but indifferent. One rainy evening, 
after business had been closed, these two young men held the fol- 
lowing conversation : 

"Harry, where are you going this rainy evening ?" 

"To prayer meeting, and would like very much to have you 
go along, Frank." 

"No, Harry, I cannot, I have an engagement at nine o'clock 
with some friends of mine to play cards." 

"Oh! prayer meeting will be over until that time," said 
Harry, "and then you can go and fulfill your engagement." 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



34 



"No, I do not deem it the best to make a medley of spiritual 
and secular things," said Frank. 

Harry took out his watch saying, "It is almost time for 
prayer meeting and, if you will not go, I suppose I will have to 
be getting towards the church, for it is a long walk and the sooner 
there, the more benefit one gets from the meeting." Saying this, 
he pulled on his overcoat and, in a short time, was plodding on 
through the rain to receive a blessing from his Maker. But 
Frank, still seated in the office of his employers, seemed to be 
wrapped in the blanket of thought. He would shift his head from 
hand to hand as he supported its weight by resting his elbow up- 
on the table. He sat in this manner for at least an hour. Then 
he arose and, soloquizingly said, " I imagine Harry thinks I 
have hid my talent in the earth, but some day I expect to reform, 
then I will do as mother requested before she died. There is not 
much ust in a young fellow like Harry to be spending all his 
time in church-going. As for me I think it is time enough after 
one has had a glimpse of the world." Saying this, he went across 
the office, took from a hook his overcoat, drew it own, and turn- 
ing out the gas departed, locking the door after him. Soon he 
was with his company of card players. One young fellow had 
brought with him a jug of fermented cider and of course, Frank 
was easily enticed to drink. The card playing went on and on. 
Soon the boys were so intoxicated they could scarcely tell what 
was trump. Still on and on went the festive mirth until the 
golden sun shed its beaming rays in the room, as though it were 
attempting to shame these young men. Frank was the first to 
stagger out, but soon others followed and then others till at last 
the party was broken up. 

Frank, as soon as out, started for the store where he well 
knew he should have been at least an hour earlier. When he ar- 
rived at the establishment, he was soon confronted by the fore- 
man who, seeing his condition, called him into the office and dis- 
charged him. 

About this time the call had been hurled abroad over our 
land for volunteers to enter the Spanish- American war and Frank, 
after he had been discharged, entertained no thought but that of 
joining the army. After being examined by a recruiting officer, 
he enlisted in the Second Virginia infantry which was composed 
of some of the finest specimens of moral, physical, and intellectual 



35 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



manhood of America, nearly all being Y. M. C. A. men. Frank's 
company was at once transported to Havana, where the pulse of 
war had already begun to beat. 

The patriotism, that thrills and penetrates the souls of every 
loyal American upon occasions of this sort, had touched the soul 
of Harry James, the chum of Frank Gordan. Harry resigned his 
situation in the firm of Caton &Co., and was soon on his way to 
fight for the liberty of a people who had their hearts pierced by a 
tyrannical sword. Harry enlisted in the First New York, a com- 
pany composed of men of bad character. They were quartered at 
Tampa, Fla., and the first night in the camp the men sneered and 
laughed at poor Harry, when he was seen reading his Bible. 
Soon Harry was led away from the paths of right by these ruffians. 

At this time there was a bill passed, giving the soldiers the 
right to buy inebriating liquors which, if ushered into oblivion, 
would have made more fortunate mothers and fathers, more hap- 
py sisters and brothers, more wives and sweethearts enjoying hap- 
piness. Harry was forced to drink and at the end of three weeks 
had laid all religious duties aside and was on the road to become 
a drunkard. 

Frank Gordan had now become a follower of Him who leads 
men safe into battle, having, through the influence exerted upon 
him by the good men of his company , been converted, and now 
was fulfilling the entreaty of his dead mother. 

The troops from Tampa had already been transported to Cu- 
ban soil, and with them the drunkard Harry James. They had 
not been on the island long before the orders came for them to 
march to Santiago. After arriving there it was not long until they 
were under the sound of rattling musketry and belching cannon. 
The onset was fierce and bloody ; at noon the enemy fled, leaving 
the field covered with the wounded, dying, and dead. 

The company of which Frank James was a member was in 
the fray and, after the battle, his company had given itself up to 
the care of the unfortunate. Frank was looking for some one to 
whom he might render assistance. Suddenly he saw a form lying 
in the sun and, bending down to look at the face of the unfortu- 
nate one, recognized the body to be that of Harry James, his chum 
and fellow- worker in the wholesale house of Caton & Co. His 
life was fleeing from him as a dead leaf is carried before the wind. 
Harry was under the influence of liquor at this very moment. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



36 



Frank, kneeling down by his side, offered a prayer to God in his 
behalf. 

"Too late Frank, no drunkard can enter the kingdom of 
Heaven," said Harry. 

Thus reader, here were two paths of patriotism, Harry James' 
terminating in the destruction of his soul, and Frank Gordan's 
ending in a surrender to God. 

Charles Edgar Roudabush, '03. 

Copper deposits in IRortbern HIMcbigan, 

{Continued from last number.} 

After treatment in the stamp mills the copper is collected and 
taken to the smelters where it is refined and cast into cakes and 
ingots for the market. During the year 1898 the total output of 
refined copper from the Lake Superior copper mines reached the 
sum of 153,660,603 pounds, of which the Calumet & Hecla alone 
produced 90,000,000 pounds, and her total product to the close of 
1898 was 1,269,000,000 pounds. It must necessarily be true that 
Calumet & Hecla should be the greatest producer with all her 
equipment and all the stamped rock yielding three per cent in 
copper, to say nothing of the larger masses obtained. 

So great, indeed, has been the development of the copper 
mines of Upper Michigan, that her other products, (gold, silver, 
and iron) are practically overshadowed, and we overlook the fact 
that she stands credited on the books of the director of the mint 
with upward of $4,000,000 in silver, but this is unquestionably too 
small because the miners, however honest otherwise, feel that the 
copper belongs to the company but the silver to the finder. While 
there are prosperous copper mines in other states and countries, it 
can be said with a certainty that none have produced masses so 
large, or quantities so great in the same length of time, and yet 
judging from the past history of the Lake Superior mines we must 
believe that much still remains to be learned in this district which 
figured in the lives of the mound builders, and thus connects 
them with modern mining industries. 

Howard E. Enders, '97. 

"Keep a stiff rein, and move but gently on." 



4 



37 THE COLLEGE FORUM. 

£be College Quartette. 

The quartette, composed of H. E. Spessard, W. S. Roop, S. 
D. Kaufman, and C. R. Engle, together with H. L. Eichinger, 
elocutionist, made a tour during vacation through the Eastern 
and central parts of the state. They entertained large audiences 
in the following towns and cities: Newport, McVeytown, Ty- 
rone, Altoona, Portage, Wilmore, Flemmington, Williamsport 
and Shamokin. The people received the boys with an open heart 
and attentive ear, insisting upon their return soon again. By 
constant practice and persistent efforts, they have succeeded in 
blending their tones in such melody as to be exceedingly pleasing 
to the listener. They contemplate making another tour through 
Southern Pennsylvania and portions of Maryland. We highly 
recommend their efforts to all the friends of L. V. C. and to the 
public. 

lPbUofcoemian. 

At this, the beginning of a new term, we greet you — the 
many new students who have come among us for the first time. 
Our aim is coincident with yours, that is, to develop ourselves as 
we have opportunity. Let us not forget the development to be 
attained in the literary society and take advantage of it. 

Philokosmian notes with encouragement its success along 
all lines during the past term . 

The officers elected for the ensuing year are as follows : Pres., 
Harry E. Spessard; Vice Pres., Harry H. Yohe ; Rec. Sec, 
William A. Burd ; Cor. Sec, C. W. Waughtel ; Critic, T. F. 
Miller ; Qhaplain, S. F. Daugherty ; Organist, Raymond Engle; 
Janitor, Karnig Kuyoomjian. 

Near the close of last term the society was successful in or- 
ganizing an orchestra. At present it consists of ten pieces. 
Under the efficient director-ship of H. C. Klinger it has furnished 
for the society some excellent music. 

The Philo Anniversary is near at hand and we extend to all 
a hearty invitation to be present on the occasion and enjoy with 
us what promises to be an excellent program . 

J. Walter Esbenshade. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



38 



1kal03etean. 

Now, as the last term of the year has been entered upon, the 
Kalos are strenuously endeavoring to climax all previous efforts 
to success, educationally, socially, and numerically. 

The new officers have entered 'upon their respective duties 
with an earnestness that assures us that Kaloism has been entrust-- 
ed to worthy hands. 

At the twenty-third Anniversary, held in the college chapel, 
Friday, April 6th, we were pleased to note the number and esteem 
of Kalo friends, by the large and appreciative audience which 
greeted the orators for the occasion. 
We append the program in full : 

March — Realm of Beauty, Armstrong! 

Lebanon Banjo Club. 
President's Address, W. J. Sanders, '02. 

Trio — Mandolin and Guitar, Selected. 

Messrs. Becker, Artz, Hershberger. 
Oration — Man an Altruist, David E. Long, '00. 

Overture — Cupid s Realm, Armstrong. 

Lebanon Banjo Club. 
Oration — The Great Despoiler, S. Edwin Rupp, '01. 
Banjo and Piano, Selected. 

Mr. Rutter and Miss Atkins. 
Oration — The Possibilities of a Cell, 

Samuel H. Derrickson, '02. 
Polka — Philomela, Eno. 

Lebanon Banjo Club. 
Paper on Der Einsige, Alvin E. Shroyer, '00. 

Ocarina Duet, Selected. 

Messrs. M. A. and A. G. Reizenstein. 
Honorary Oration — Cadmus and Caliban, 

Samuel J. Evers, A. B., B. D., '91. 
March— Little Rascal, Heller. 
Lebanon Banjo Club. 

It is needless to add that this was one of the most successful 
anniversaries in the history of the society. From it the society 
has derived great encouragement to go forth and conquer hitherto 
unsurmountable difficulties, and verify the maxim, "Truth con- 
quers all " 

We are delighted to welcome to our college so many new 
students this term, and most cordially invite them to the Kalo 
Hall, knowing well that if they choose to make it their society 
home, every loyal Kalo will extend to them a fraternal welcome. 

E. M. Balsbaugh. 



39 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Cltontan. 

We are glad, as Clios, to welcome the many new students, 
especially, to welcome so many new ladies into our midst and 
would urge them to join our society at once. Seven have already 
handed in their names and riope the rest will do so very soon. 
This term, being the last school term for some of us, we would 
urge the new students to come in and take our places. 

The newly elected officers for the Spring Term are: Pres., 
Reba F. Lehman, 'oo ; V. Pres., Nellie Buffmgton, 'oo ; Rec. 
Sec, Enid Daniel, 'oo ; Critic, Anna E. Kreider, 'oo ; Cor. Sec, 
Nora E. Spayd, 'oo ; Treas., Elizabeth Stehman, '02 ; Librarian, 
Edith S. Spangler, '03. 

The joint committee from the Philos and Clios is preparing 
an excellent program for the joint session in the near future. 

We are anxiously looking forward to the completion of our 
new Music Conservatory, since we have been informed that we 
shall have one room to be fitted up as our new society home. We 
appreciate the great kindness of our superiors in granting us this 
favor and hope our society work will show our appreciation of 
their kindness. 



Btbletice- 



Our College base ball team played its first game for the sea- 
son with Ursinus, at College ville, on Saturday, April 7th. 
While the game was decided in favor of Ursinus, it was by a very 
small margin, the score being 16 to 14. It is conceded that, in 
the main, our boys showed themselves quite equal to the opposing 
team, and the result of this, the first game of the season, is al- 
together encouraging to the friends of the base ball team. 

URSINUS. 

Miller, 3b. 3 1 o 3 1 

Kelley, ib. 4 3 11 o 1 

Houck, 2b. 23563 

Kochenderfer, cf. 3 1 1 o 2 

Gauch, c. 12700 

Rinker, If. 1 1 1 o 1 

Roth, rf. 02102 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



40 



ts, 
id 
3y 

n. 
Id 



• > 
n, 

»g 

.ir 
re 
f e 
is 
of 



Kaiser, ss. 


1 


1 


0 


3 


3 


Townsend, p. 


1 


1 


1 


2 


0 


Total, 


16 


15 


27 




13 


LEBANON VALLEY. 








Clemens, 2b. 


5 


0 


2 


3 


0 


Snoke, If. 


2 


0 


1 


0 


0 


Hollenbaugh, rf. 


3 


0 


0 


0 


0 


Grey, ib. 


1 


1 


8 


1 


1 


Speraw, c. 


1 


1 


11 


1 


1 


Fenstermacher, ss. 


1 


0 


0 


3 


0 


Shenk, 3b. 


0 


6 


1 


0 


0 


Albright, cf. 


0 


1 


0 


0 


0 


Winters, p. 


1 


0 


1 


4 


0 


Total, 


H 


3 


24 


12 


2 



alumni IRotee* 



'72. 

Rev. J. H. Graybeill of St. Marys, Pa. recently buried his 
mother at Annville, Pa. 

'73- 

Dr. H. B. Stehman of Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, is on 
the coast for his health. 



Rev. Joseph Daugherty was appointed by the Pennsylvania 
Conference to Carlisle. 

Likewise, Rev. John E. Kleffman to Duncannon, Pa. 

'90. 

Win. R. Keller, Esq., on April 7th, was sworn in as a reg- 
ular practicing lawyer in the several practicing courts of Philadel- 
phia. Mr. Keller who has a record well up in the 90's for pro- 
ficiency in the pension department where he was employed as 
clerk, passed in the law examination, seventh in a class of forty- 
four, making a grade of 100 per cent, in Common Law Pleading. 
He took his three years' course by working exclusively in the 
night. 




4 i THE COLLEGE FORUM. 

Mr. Allen F. Ward has put an extensive laundry plant in 
the city of Lebanon, on North 7th street. 

•91. 

Rev. Samuel J. Evers was recently visiting friends av Ann-j 
ville. He delivered the honorary oration at the Kalozetean An- 
niversary, April 6th. His theme was "Cadmus and Caliban." 

'92 and '98. 

Messrs. Andrew R. Kreider and his brother Edward, who re- 
cently established a knitting mill in Aunville, report their mill 
running to its full capacity with many orders ahead. 

'96. 

Mr. H. H. Heberly is still bookkeeper for Celestino, Costello 
& Co., as well as private secretary to Mr. A. B. Farquhar of 
York, and recently was offered the position of bookkeeper for the 
Pennsylvania Agricultural Works of York, Pa. 



personals anfc Xocale. 



Rev. D. E. Eshlemau, B. D., our college pastor, conducted 
devotional exercises in college chapel on March 25th. 

Miss M. Etta Wolfe, professor of the English Language and 
Literature, and instructor in German, enjoyed the company of her, 
mother for a few days. 

Rev. H. L. Eichinger, '03, who had been conducting revival 
services at his charge, is at his studies again. 

Mr. Clyde Saylor, '00, entertained his classmates at a social 
dinner at his home on Wednesday, April 4th. 

Prof. Stein conducted devotional exercises on March 30th 
after which he gave a stimulating talk to the student body. 

Rev. C. A. Mutch, pastor of Reading Memorial Y. P. C. U. 
church and a trustee of the college, attended chapel exercises on 
March 30th. 

Bishop E. B. Kephart gave the students an interesting and 
instructive talk on his recent trip through Egypt, Palestine, and 
Rome, dwelling particularly on the ancient city Baal- bee. On 
the evening of the 10th he delivered a lecture in the college chapel 
particularly of his journey through Egypt and the Holy Land 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



4-2 



The proceeds of this lecture were for the benefit of the missionary 
societies of the church. 

An evidence of the fact of the progress Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege is making is the addition to the main building of a North 
wing which is under construction. 

President Roop filled the pulpit of Trinity U. B. church, 
Lebanon, both morning and evening of Sunday, the 8th inst. 

Exchanges* 

The following March exchanges have been received : — The 
Comenian, Anchor, Watchword, Aurora, Lesbian Herald, Phoenix, 
College Folio, Ursi?ius College Bulletin, Juniata Echo, Western 
Maryland College Monthly, Gettysburg Mercury, Lyman School 
Enterprise, Emerson College Magazine, Hedding Graphic, Philale- 
thean, College Era, Otterbein Aegis, Red a?id Blue, Werner's Mag- 
azine, Pennsylvania Herald, and Indian Helper. 

Some of the exchanges reach us at a very late date. The 
Phoe?iix for February was received on March 1 2. 

We are glad to welcome the College Era again after an ab- 
sence of several months. The article on Ingersoll and Moody is 
well written and is a good description of the influence which 
these men have exerted in the world. 



Over 60 Weaver Organs 




ARE IN USE IN 
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They were adopted after a severe con- 
test in comparison with six other 
maKes of organs of the highest 
grade. 



Write direct to us for Catalogue and Prices 

WEAYER ORGAN and PIANO CO. 

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YORK, PA. 



H.S. WObF, 

— DEALER IN— . 

Green Groceries 

and Confections. 

Restaurant in connection. 



Stephen Hubertis 

1 1 25 and 1 1 27 North Third St., 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Blank Book Manufacturer 

and JOB BOOK BINDER. 



Ruling, 
Numbering, 



Wire 
Stitching. 



If you want to Buy a Hat Right, and a 
Right Hat, dr anything in 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS, 

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8th and Cumberland Sts. 
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Harry Light 

Books ano 
Stationery 



22 East Main Street, 
Annville, Pa. 



New, second-hand and shelf worn 

COLLEGE TEXT 
BOOKS. 

STATIONERY, 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES. 

Students' Supplies a Specialty. 

West End Store J s P f 0 h P o r pe - 



General- 



Merchandise 

Shoes and Gent's Furnishing Goods 
a Specialty. 

.34-136 West Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

i860 1885 

J. HENRY MILLER, 

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LEBANON, PA. 

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Diplomas and Certificates of 
riembership. 
Commercial Work our Specialty. 



SHENK & KINPORTS, 

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Dealers in Dry GOOdS, N0ti(HlS, 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a specialty, 
Home made, Ingrain anil Brussels Carpets 
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J. G. GARMAN, 

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Livery Attached. E. Main St. 



JOSEPH MILLER, 

Furniture & Undertaking. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



iztf. C. MOOLF, 

Notions, Groceries, Etc. 

62 East Main St. 



Sheffey's Furniture Store, 



Cor. Main and 

White Oak. Street 
Undertaking A Specialty. 



JOS. A. SMITH, 

Hardware, Plain, . . . 

Stamped & Japanned Ware. 

ANNVILLE, - - PA. 



J. S. KENDIG, 
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Next Door to Hotel Eagle. 

Harry Zimmerman, D. D. S., 

HJental "Rooms, 

72 W. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA, 



The Northwestern Mutual Life 
Insurance Co., of Milwaukee, Wis 

R. A. MAULFAIR, Gen. Agt ., 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

All the latest and best policies issued 



7V\. H. SH HUD, 

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WATCHES AND JEWELRY, 

Wholesale.and Retail Dealer in 

FINE -to AND 
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Families supplied with OYSTERS. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Vol. XIII. MAY, 1900. No. 3. 

STAFF : 

Galen D. Light, 'oo, Editor-in-Chief. 
ASSOCIATE : 

Harry E. Spessard, 'oo. Alfred C. T. Sumner, '02. 

Henry H. Baish, 'ci. Charles W. Christman, '03. 

BUSINESS MANAGERS: 
S. F. Daugherty, '01, Chief. 
H. L. Eichinger, '(3, Assistant. W. C. Arncld, '03, Assistant. 

The College Forum is published monthly by the Philokosmian Literary Society 
of Lebanon Valley College. 

The College F( rum will be forwarded to all subscribers until an order is received fcr 
its discontinuance, and all arrearages have been paid. Address all business communica- 
tion!! to S. F. Daugherty, Business Manager, Box 184, Annville, 1 a. 

All mutter intended fcr the Fcrum should be submitted to the Fditcrial Staff not later 
thau the 15th of the month preceeding its appearance in the Fcrum's columns. 

TERMS :— fifty Cents Per Year. Single Copy, 10 Cts. 

Entered at the l ost Office at Annville, Fa., as sc cond-class mail matter. 



EDITORIAL. 



TLVC ^Ulli V ^ e vo ^ ume &f Bizarre is now 

ready for delivery. No labor and expense 
J8l3&tre. were spared to make this number tl:e best 
"College Annual" yet produced by the 
Junior Classes of Lebanon Valley College. Nearly the entire edi- 
tion has been exhausted by advance orders. Friends who desire 
the Bizarre, in order to be assured of a copy, would better order 
early to save themselves from disappointment. 



©UT political The fi fst essential of patriotism in politics 

©bligatiOnS should be "righteousness." What else 
^ ought we expect from the legislative rep- 

tO pOrtO 1RIC0. K . . . r nu-i f xr ? ? nn «. 

resentatives of a Christian Nation ? What 

else might we expect from a nation whose very coinage bears the 
inscription, "In God we trust?" 

Is it possible that a heathen above whose clouded horizon 
the light of Christian civilization has never streamed, under these 
adverse circumstances, could soar into a purer and clearer atmos- 
phere of precept and example than that breathed by his fellow 
countrymen and give the world the immortal doctrineof "dikasyna." 



44 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Yea, is it possible that in this century, for we believe the world 
is growing better, political cleanliness and virtue should be sacri- 
ficed for personal gain and national opulence. We fear that, un- 
der the garb of Christian benevolence, lurks the advocate of terri- 
torial aggrandizement, for naught else than pecuniary advantages. 
Spirited has been the debate, irrespective of party lines, over the 
present Porto Rican Relief Bill, providing a tariff of fifteen per 
cent, for our lately acquired possession— Porto Rico. Fierce was 
the opposition and bitter the contest over a similar policy pursued to 
a disastrous end by Lord North in his administration for the Ameri- 
can Colonies, the persistence of the English crown in maintain- 
ing his policy, so that a precedent might be established for other 
English Colonies, that is, that by taxation the crown should as- 
sert that the Colonies were not an integral part of the Empire and 
hence not within the jurisdiction of the English constitution, re- 
sulting in the loss of the Colonies. Altho our constitution is in- 
adequate for the present situation, if Porto Rico is considered no 
integral part of the Union, still our professed motives for freeing 
the oppressed from the rule of the despot, will in no wise per- 
mit such a departure from the path of duty. Again a law passed 
and enforced, which is antagonistic to the expressed wishes of the 
governed, must, to a liberty loving people, be sanctioned with re- 
luctance, especially, when other and more honorable means to the 
same end might be pursued with conformity to a people's ex- 
pressed desires. 

Neither time nor space will permit of more than a limit as to 
the conception some, who have the welfare and starry emblem at 
heart, hold respecting our duty as a Christian nation and bene- 
factor to our newly acquired territory, Porto Rico. 

flD\> 1bome in fll>an>lant>. 

There the air is clear and warm, 

There the swallows soar and sing, 
There I hear the stately elms 

Wringing praise to gladsome Spring ; 
There, beneath the weeping willow 

Bv the brooklet's bed of sand, 
I cau see the children playing 

At my home in Maryland. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



45 



Mother with her little darling 

Humming, "Hush my baby-o," 
Tells of merry childhood glee 

In the days of long ago ; 
How we left our mortared men 

Buried in the burning sand, 
And their image on the fence, 

At my home in Maryland. 

I can hear the bullfrog's bass 

In the evening shadows hid, 
And from yonder forest wood 

Tenor from the katydid ; 
From the rivulet soprano 

Sweeter than some city band, 
With the screech owl's thrilling alto, 

At my home in Maryland. 

I can see the lambs go skipping 

O'er the olive cushioned meads, 
Hear the throngs of blackbirds singing 

From the withered carrot weeds; 
See the crows in search of fish worms 

From the lately broken land, 
And the hireling digging thistles 

At my home in Maryland. 

Maryland, my Maryland, 

Ever far and yet so near, 
Always shall thy sun-kissed hills 

Fill my soul with mem'ries dear; 
Fain would I fresh laurels take 

From thy mountain's fern-clad hand, 
And one stroll across the farm, 

At my home in Maryland. 

H. E. Spessard. 



mortbfielfc. 



"I the Lord do keep it; I will water it every moment; lest 
any hurt it, I will keep it night and day." The beautiful village 
of Northfield is situated on the east side of the Connecticut river 
in Northern Massachusetts, not far from the place where the Pur- 
itans first set foot on American soil. This town, of about three 
thousand inhabitants, is a model in every respect. The streets are 
broad and well-shaded in the day and well lighted at night ; the 



46 THE COLLEGE FORUM. 




main street is especially beautiful, being at least one hundred feet 
wide with two rows of giant elms about twenty feet apart on 
either side of the street; the homes are constructed mostly on the 
Colonial style and are very neat and elegant ; the climate is de- 
lightful, and the people robust, industrious, intelligent, and deep- 
ly religious, and this latter fact has no doubt insured God's gra- 
cious care over this part of his vineyard. It is not my purpose, 
however, to devote these lines to physical or political features of 
Northfield, but rather to relate brieflv a few facts concerning the 
Northfield schools and the famous Summer Conferences held 
there. 

The schools, two in number, have both been founded by the 
noted evangelist Dwight L Moody. Previous to our attending 
the World's Student Conference last summer, we had heard a 
great deal about the Northfield Conferences as being great spiritual 
feasts and as means of broadening and deepening the spiritual life 
of those who attend them, but we had heard little concerning the 
schools there, so that it was rather a surprise to us on arriving at 
Northfield to find two such valuable school properties as are lo- 
cated there. The one in East Northfield, known as Northfield 
Seminary, is a school for young women. Ic would be rather diffi- 
cult to say just when Northfield Seminary was born. The story 
is told, however, that, shortly after Mr. Moody's and Mr. Sankey's 
return from the old country from the evangelistic campaign there, 
Mr. Moody spent several months at his home at Northfield, 
and happened one day to be driving the steep road which leads up 
over one of the mountains overlooking Northfield, and as he 
reached the summit of the mountain, there suddenly came into 
view one of those lonely farmhouses so often found on unfre- 
quented roads, and here Mr. Moody found, as has been related, 
5'oung girls engaged *in the monotonous occupation of making 
baskets. This was by no means an unusual sight, especially in 
New England, but it attracted Mr. Moody's attention, and the 
thought at once flashed into his mind, "Those girls have as much 
right to an education as any one else, but how can they get it?" 
As a result of this question, at least ten handsome buildings of 
brick and stone stand upon a smooth green campus which slopes 
gently down the Connecticut. Northfield with its well equipped 
dormitories, gymnasium, library, and recitation halls, its complete 
course of study, its corps of competent teachers is Mr. Moody's 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



47 



answer to his own problem of educating not two or three, but 
about four hundred girls yearly. Shortly after the founding of a 
school for young women, Mr. Moody thought the young men of 
the vicinity should have a like opportunity afforded for educating 
themselves and another school, Mt. Hermon Academy, was es- 
tablished, 1882. Here there are even more buildings than in 
East Northfield, and the attendance also is larger, being over five 
hundred. These schools, in which nearly half a million of dollars 
have been invested, are perhaps the greatest monument that Mr. 
Moody has left to perpetuate his memory, and our prayer is that 
God may indeed keep and water them. 

The Summer Conferences, three in number, are held during 
each summer, the World's Student, the Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association and a General Conference, the first two lasting 
for ten, and the last for twenty days. The purpose of these con- 
ferences is to train men and women for more efficient Christian 
work. The study of the Bible is one of the leading features of 
each Conference. Here, too. the claims of the heathen upon the 
Christian world are presented, as perhaps nowhere else, and as a 
result hundreds have consecrated their lives to foreign mission 
work. Any, one whose ambition is to please God and whose 
heart is open to conviction cannot help but receive great benefit 
from attending any one of these conferences, and although this 
year the earnest words and loving, forceful personality of Mr. 
Moody will be greatly missed, yet we are assured 'that the pro- 
grams for the various conferences will be as strong as ever before 
in their history. S F. Daughekty, '01. 

1lf Hbcy ©nl£ Iknew. 

"What does it cost, this garniture of death ? 

It costs the life which God alone can give; 
It costs dull silence where was music's breath, 

It costs dead joy, that foolish pride may live. 
Ah, life, and joy, and song, depend upon it, 

Are costly trimmings for a woman's bonnet." 

— May Riley Smith. 

"Oh, Sue!" said Emma in a very disturbed voice, "I do 
wish you would stop repeating that nasty poetry, I have heard so 



48 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



much of Lite about wearing birds on hats that I am really out of 
spirits." 

"Why, Emma, you surprise me! " answered Sue, a beauti- 
fully sweet-tempered girl of seventeen, who had lived on a farm 
all her life and learned to love and protect the birds in early 
childhood, a girl untainted with the foolish pride and empty van- 
ity of the city, who never wore birds on her hat, never caused the 
life-blood of an innocent creature to be spilt to satisfy this fad of 
woman. 

"I am perfectly devoted to birds and before I leave for the 
country you will hear more of it. For I am full of bird lore. I 
have a mind to begin at once — 

'Don't kill the birds, the pretty birds 
That sing about your door, 
Soon as the joyous spring has come, 
And chilling storms are o'er.' 

"That's better," said, Emma, earnestly, "I never did kill a 
bird, and always scolded Johnny for stoning the birds and rub 
bing their nests. 

"That's not nearly so mean as that other piece of poetry in 
which you say something about 'foolish pride, life and joy and 
song are costly trimmings for a woman's bonnet.' "Do you 
know Sue, you will have to be a little careful how you talk about 
those 'trimmings' ? It is all the fashion now and we all wear 
birds on our hats, from the wives of the professors of our college 
and ministers of our churches down to the factory girl, every- 
body, in fact, who has any decency of dress, any idea, any com- 
mon sense of style, wear them." 

"I don't care who wears them," said Sue, with a heavy sigh, 
"that does not make it right. Listen what the Bible says about 
bird protection. *'If a bird's nest chance to be before thee in the 
way, in any tree, or on the ground, whether they be young ones 
or eggs, and the dam sitting upon the young, or upon the eggs, 
thou shalt not take the dam with the young, but thou shalt in 
anywise let the dam go, that it may be well with thee, and that 
thou mayest prolong thy days. That was a plain common sense 
direction given by that grand old Hebrew lawgiver, Moses, more 
than 1450 years before Christ. So you see there is nothing in 

*Deut. 22:6. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



49 



that which justifies women no matter how high they stand in so- 
ciety, to make a bier of their heads, a charnel house of beaks and 
claws, and bones and feathers and glass eyes of her fashionable 
hat. But so it is, if women could only know of the horrible de- 
struction of bird life that their love for finery occasions, they 
would make it unfashionable to wear the feathers of murdered 
birds. It must be that they do not know, yet it is among the 
cultured, the most enlightened and intelligent where this indiff- 
erence and hardness of heart exists which baffles and perplexes me. 

"Do you know," continued Sue, '"that 40,00 terns were 
killed in a single season on Cape Cod, that in 1891 a party cruelly 
murdered 130,000 egrets and herons in the swamps of Florida, 
that on Cobb's Island, Va., 40,000 sea swallows were shot in one 
summer, and coming a little nearer home — my heart aches at the 
thought — that r, 000, 000 bobolinks were ruthlessly slaughtered in 
a single month, near Philadelphia. These are facts, Emma, that 
ought to furnish serious thought for reflection. This wholesale 
slaughter of God's own creation, your sisters of the air, members 
of God's great orchestra, ought to melt the fickle heart of fash- 
ion ! ' ' 

"Pardon me, Emma" said Sue, warming up with righteous 
indignation, "allow me to quote from Margery Dean, who writes : 
'American women who have hearts so tender they could not step 
uptn a worm or kill a butterfly, are guilty of a thoughtless cru- 
elty and make an industry possible and profitable by blindly fol- 
lowing a fashion. It is wholly thoughtless, for no woman in our 
land could deliberately allow creatures to be blinded, snared and 
slaughtered for the gratification of ornamenting her head for a few 
weeks " 

"Oh, Sue ! Don't read any more of that stuff" said Emma 
with tears slowly rolling down her tender cheeks, "I — " 

"Pardon me, again." interrupted Sue, "allow me to read a 
little more from a common sense article written by Olive Thorne 
Miller, in which she asks the questions, "How can a thoughtful 
woman feeling some responsibility in the training of her children 
reconcile her conscience to the constant object lessons in cruelty 
which the wearing of murdered birds holds up before her children ? 
How dare she thus endorse and tacitly approve cruelty and bar- 
barity which she cannot but know are a necessary part of this in- 
famous trade?' " 



5o 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



"Oh, Sue! cried Emma with the tears now rapidly flowing 
down her cheeks. It must be thoughtlessness. I shall never 
wear another bird upon my hat as long as I live, and 'a bier of 
dead birds — has it come to that — must this be our thought of a 
woman's hat?' shall mean more to me than a mere jingle of 
words. The songs of every murdered bird which I wore upon 
my hat seems even now to jingle with mournful tones deep within 
the recesses of my soul . 

"How glad I am, Sue, that you came to see me. What can 
I do to atone for my thoughtless sinning? Nothing shall be too 
great a sacrifice now for the sake of the dear little birds. Let us 
hurry and go to see Belle. She wears aigrettes on her hat, and 
she thinks they are perfectly lovely. Poor, dear sister knows no 
better. I know you will touch her heart as you have mine when 
you tell her the unspeakably cruel manner in which aigrettes are 
obtained. Her heart is too tender to hear half. She is out in the 
yard under the old apple tree, sitting in the hammock, reading 
the affecting story of Robin Red Breast, enjoying the songs of the 
very birds which perhaps in a few short months will be perched 
lifeless upon the hat of some thoughtless woman.'' 

"How eloquent you are becoming," answered Sue, almost 
choking with smiles, I do believe you will become more devoted 
to the birds than I am."' 

"How I wish every girl was as easily changed as you from 
thoughtfulness to thought'essness" said Sue! 

"Oh, Sue!" interrupted Emma. "No one could be so hard- 
hearted as to resist your persuasions." 

"Oh, yes, Emma dear, to many of them I have talked, and 
pleaded and begged with some girls until the fast flowing tears 
themselves seemed to sympathize with the birds, but all to no 
avail. They would not turn their backs on Fashion and go about 
sinlessly adorned. They would give the most non sensical argu- 
ments in answer to the most humane reasoning until I was almost 
tempted to wish, for I fear we no longer merit these precious 
gifts of God, that all the birds would emigrate to a friendlier 
clime, a land a little nearer their God, inhabited by a kinder peo- 
ple than ours, where they might be safe from the cruel hand of 
man spurred on by woman! Where no woman, O Bird, wants 
your corpse to carry on her head ! Where there is no motto, 
You shall die, that vanity, that Fashion may live! "Where you, 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



5i 



dear birds, might live your sweet lives undisturbed ! Where you 
would be treated with proper respect, the consideration, and 
grateful love which your presence deserves. I pray and hope 
that the day will yet come, before many more species are entirely 
extinct, when every woman will look upon the wearing of birds 
as a sign of heartlessness and a mark of ignominy and reproach." 
"Come, Sue, let's see Belle." A, '01. 

Gbe IRigbt TUse of Gtme. 

A French writer once said: "Time is the stuff with which 
our life is made." If this is true, a right use of time would make 
our lives worth living ; while a not right use of it would make 
them miserable in the end in whatever way we look at the matter. 
The use of time has a great part to play in the framing of our 
character and destiny. The rate at which time moves and the 
manner in which it overtakes us are such as should make us very 
cautious in its method of employment. Who would not value 
time and its right use after reading beneath the words of the dying 
Queen Elizabeth : "Time ! time ! a world of wealth for an inch of 
time!" Note the comparison. 

The following is a true and beautiful presentation of time in 
all its phases : 

"Time was, is past; thou canst not it recall. 

Time is, thou hast ; employ the portion small. 

Time future, is not — and may never be; 

Time present is the only time for thee." 
May we venture to sketch the experience of some of our fellow 
students? Slack in work, half hearted in studies and games, often 
full of regrets and remorse for wasted opportunities. The past, 
oh such a failure. To such we would say — "Time is, thou hast ;" 
employ it in the right way. There are very few cases in which 
the past cannot be retrieved in a measure. But remember, you 
are spending present time or work that should have been done at 
some past time and you are not much at a gain. Time is too im- 
portant to be wasted. It is Eternity begun. Spend it rightly. 

-A 

Intelligent concentration is the secret of efficiency. 



52 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



CUcmian. 



We have only one month until another school year is over. 
We feel sad at leaving our society work, yet glad that so much 
has been accomplished the past school year, while some things 
have been left for next year's work. 

The evening of May 12 will be one long remembered by every 
Clio and Philo. The committees appointed to prepare a program 
for the joint session far surpassed the expectations of the rest. 
Instead of giving us only a solid educational program they satis- 
fied our physical appetites as well, and we were more than sur- 
prised when the committees appeared with ice cream and cake. It 
was a novel feature and we know that it proved a perfect success. 
We were pleased to have with us, among others, on this occasion, 
Miss Brightbill of Fulton, Mo., and Miss Loose of Berne, Pa. 

Lillian G. Kreider. Editress. 

1Ral03etean. 

Our society during the first half of the Spring term has seemed 
to realize more than ever the benefits to be derived from a literary 
society culture. Our meetings have been well attended and our 
programs have been better than those of the preceding term. 

Of the new students, we have entertained many, three of 
whom, Bert Strayer, Walter Strayer, and Harry Mover have 
joined the ranks of K. L. S. and hereafter will endeavor to de- 
velop themselves under the motto, "No reward without labor." 
We hope for still more members this term. 

Our meetings are always open to visitors and we welcome to 
our meetings any one who has the desire to be present. In the 
very near future we hope to give a special program to the class of 
1900, at which time, we will do our best to leave a good impres- 
sion with our out going Senior class. We will do what we can 
to please them for we realize that not only all the literary societies 
of the institution, but the College itself, lose an intellectual band 
of young men and women. 

The play which our society had decided to give has been post- 
poned until next year, because we realize that the spring term is 
not the time for amateur theatricals. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



53 



We wish again to extend to all friends of the College, and 
students a hearty invitation to visit us. 

A. G. Smith. 



IPbilofcoeniian anniversary 



The Thirty-Third Anniversary of the Philokosraian Literary 
Society was held on Friday evening, May 4. In all respects, this 
anniversary surpassed any yet held by the society. The substitu- 
tion of a debate for the usual orations by members of the society 
was very much appreciated and. was a decided success. The 
speakers were all well prepared and handled the question in a way 
that showed perfect familiarity with the subject. The audience 
was delighted with the pleasing manner and elegant language of 
the speakers, and showed their appreciation by earnest attention. 
Rounds of applause followed the decision of the judges, rendered 
by Rev. Craig B. Cross, in favor of the affirmative. 

The reception which followed the literary program was largely 
attended by the friends of the society, and enjoyed by all. Ex- 
cellent music was furnished for the occasion by Kurzeukuabe's 
orchestra of Harrisburg. 

Following is the program in full : 

St. John's Commandery March, Farrar. 
Orchestra. 

INVOCATION. 

Overture— Jollities, Buckolz. 
Orchestra. 

President's Address, Harry E. Spessard. 

Caprice— Little Mischief, Armand. 
Orchestra. 

Debate— Resolved: That the Attitude of the United States to- 
ward the Philippine Islands is Justifiable. 
Affirmative : Negative : 

Robert R. Butterwick, 'cw, Oren G. Myers, '00, 

Charles E. Snoke, '00. William O. Roop, '01. 

Evening Serenade, • Fuhrt. 

Orchestra. 
Honorarv Oration — The Practical Man, 

Rev. Isaac H. Albright, A. M., Ph. D. 
Decision of Debate. 

Judges: Hon. R. L. Myers, Rev. Craig B. Cross, 
' C. V. Henry, Esq. 

March— Boston Tea Party, J'ryor. 
Orchestra. 



54 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



The honorary oration requires special mention and we are 
sorry that we do not have the space to give all of it. Among 
many other things he said: The teaching, "Once in grace, al- 
ways in grace" may be disputed by some, but once Philokos- 
mians, always Philokosmians, is beyond dispute. We have found 
life to be a conquest, a battle, and not mere play, there is ample 
room, therefore, for the practical man. We are living in a prac- 
tical age, and the call everywhere is for the practical man, the 
man who can bring something to pass. The immense develop- 
ment of the industrial life has discounted theorizing and put a 
premium on action. Talent in this age is no match for practical 
common sense. The world is full of men who are away up in 
theory, but down in practice. In the great race of life practical 
common sense has the right of way. The twentieth century will 
not ask you from where you come, what you know, but what can 
you do? We must not forget that life's preparation and discipline 
are difficult in proportion as the end attained is high and noble. 
God has put the highest price upon the greatest worth. The 
practical man, in short, wins, wrests victory out of his defeats. 

J. Walter Esbenshade, '03. 

1?. to. <r. a. 

Since the visit of Mrs. Lowery, State Y. W. C. A. Secretary, 
the Association has received inspiration to take up the work anew. 
Most of the new girls have joined with us and we hope, by the 
end of this term, to have the name of every girl in the hall on our 
roll. 

Besides the regular weekly prayermeeting, every Sunday 
morning, Miss Wolfe conducts a Bible reading on the "Women 
of the Bible." Most of the girls attend this service and are very 
much interested in it. Possibly nothing can show better the in- 
terest of the girls than the fact they have decided to send three 
delegates to Northfield. They have elected Miss Lehman, Miss 
Moyer and Miss Stehman to represent their Association. 

13. no. c. a. 



The devotional meetings of the Y. M. C. A on Sunday af- 



COLLEGE FORUM. 



55 



ternoons continue to be characterized by a deep spiritual interest. 

A joint meeting of the Associations on May 6, was well at- 
tended. Pres. Roop made an interesting address on the "Ecu- 
menical Conference" and Rev. Eshleman gave a practical talk on 
Missions. 

The Association is glad to welcome several new members 
and cordially invites all to the meetings. 

Arrangements are being made to conduct a refreshment stand 
during Commencement week. 

At a recent business meeting the following men were elected 
delegates to the Northfield Conference: President, D. M. Oyer; 
Secretary, D. J. Cowling, J. W. Esbenshade and H. H. Baish. 

Base Ball, 

The College base ball team played a most interesting game 
with the Yale Law School on Saturday, April 14. The game was 
played on the home grounds and was witnessed by a large num- 
ber of spectators. The Yale boys, doubtless, came expecting an 
easy victory, having defeated Albright College the day before by 
a large score. These expectations, however, did not seem so sure 
of realization by the end of the first inning, when the score stood 
5 to 3 in favor of L. V. C. But for one serious error by the home 
team, the visitors would not have gotten a single run in the first 
inning. For the remainder of the game the playing strength of 
the two teams seemed quite well balanced. At the close of the 
ninth inning the score stood 8 to 7 in favor of L. V. C. The fol- 
lowing is the record : 

LEBANON VALLEY. 





R 


H 


0 


A 


E 


Clemens, 2b. 


2 


2 


.5 


3 


O 


Snoke, If. 


I 


2 


2 


1 


O 


Speraw, c. 


2 


2 


5 


0 


O 


Fenstermacher, ss. 


I 


3 


1 


3 


I 


Albright, ib. 


I 


2 


1 1 


0 


I 


Winters, p. 


I 


2 


0 


6 


O 


Hollenbaugh, rf. 


O 


1 


1 


0 


O 


Schaeffer, cf. 


O 


0 


0 


0 


O 



56 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



bhenk, 3b. 


0 


I 


1 


0 


1 






T C 
1 O 


26 


T 1 


0 


YALE 


LAW 


SCHOOL. 










R 


jj 


0 


A 




Fessenden, p. 


I 


O 


1 


O 


O 


Robertson, 3b. 


3 


3 


1 


O 


I 


Lane, 2b. 


2 


0 


1 


3 


O 


Payne, c. 


0 


0 


7 


0 


O 


Malone, ib. 


0 


2 


10 


0 


O 


Buchannon, ss. 


0 


1 


1 


2 


O 


Hyne, rf. 


0 


1 


3 


1 


O 


McGrath, If. 


0 


1 


1 


0 


I 


Lyman, cf. 


0 


0 


2 


0 


O 


Bacon, cf. 


I 


1 


1 


0 


O 



7 9 28 6 2 

Lebanon Valley, 502 10000 o — 8 
Yale Law School, 30200000 2—7 

On Friday, April 20, a game was played with the Carlisle 
Indians, on the College Campus. The rain, which continued in- 
cessantly throughout the game, made it very unpleasant for the 
players, but none the less interesting for the spectators. Up to 
the fifth inning, the score stood 1 — o in favor of the visiting team. 
At the beginning of the fifth, Albright started off with a base hit 
for L. V. C. Weir followed with a two base hit, sending Al- 
bright to third. Just at this point, Pego, who had been pitching 
for the Indians up to this time, was superseded by Le Roy. The 
latter left Albright come from third home, on a wild ball. He 
then sent Clemens and Snoke to base on balls. Speraw followed 
with a hit which brought Weir and Clemens home. On another 
passed ball, Snoke came home, making the score 4 — 1 in favor of 
L. V. C. In the second half of the inning, the Indians also made 
three additional runs, thus tying the score. Owing to the inclem- 
ency of the weather and the bad condition of the grounds, the 
game was not continued beyond the fifth inning. The following 
is the score by innings : 

Indians, 0100 3 — 4 

Lebanon Valley, 0000 4 — 4 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



57 



On Saturday, April 28, our team won the victory of the sea- 
son thus far, in a game with Franklin and Marshall. The game 
was played on the home grounds, and resulted in the score of 10 
to 1 in favor of L. V. C. This result, in itself, is evidence of the 
superior playing of our team, which jput up a game with almost 
no room for criticism. For the poor showing made by the visi- 
tors, they had many complaints and excuses, all of which is, of 
course, very natural. The following is the score by innings: 
Lebanon Valley, 10125100 o — 10 

Franklin and Marshall, 1 0000000 o — 1 

The second team played a very interesting game of base ball 
with Harrisburg University, on the afternoon of May 5, on the 
college campus Although the home team was defeated by a 
score of 14 to 12, it is nevertheless to be commended for the fine 
showing it made in this, its first game for the season. The score 
by innings was : 

Harrisburg University, 0006700 1 o — 14 
Second Team, 14020301 1 — 12 

On Saturday, May 12, the College base ball team defeated the 
Lebanon team by a score of 18 to 6. The game was played on the 
home grounds amid rain which continued to fall without inter- 
mission. The game was called at the close of ihe fifth inning. 

alumni et Hlumnae. 

'81. 

Professor E. H. Sneath, who is at present Professor of Phi- 
losophy at Yale, has recently been elected to membership in the 
American Social Science Association. This is one of the oldest 
scientific associations of the country and Prof. Sneath enjoys the 
distinction of being one of only four members from the Univer- 
sity; the others being President Hadley, Judge Baldwin, and 
Dean Way land of the Law School. Prof. Sneath has been invited 
to address the Association at the Washington session in May. 

"The Mind of Tennyson" is the title of a new book just pub- 
lished by Scribner's from the pen of Prof. Sneath. The volume 
is unique, occupying a field never before entered and embodies 



58 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



the results of the author's exhaustive research. It illustrates the 
originality and reasonableness of our worthy alumnus. 

The object of the research, so ably edited in this volume, was 
the philosophy of Tennyson; his thoughts are God, Freedom, 
and Immortality. 

97- 

Rev. Charles B. Wingerd graduated at the Union Biblical 
Seminary, Dayton, O., at the Commencement held in the begin- 
ing of this month. 

' 9 8.' 

Professor O. P. DeWitt, Principal of the High School at 
Royersford, will hold his Commencement exercises May 25th. 
President H. U. Roop has been invited to deliver the address. 

Mr. J. R. Geyer visited his friends of the college during the 
time of the Philo Anniversary. 

'99- 

Rev. I. E. Runk, Prof. J. W. Huntsberger, Mr. H. M. Im- 
boden, and Miss Anna Myers also attended the exercises of the 
Anniversary and spent a few pleasant days with their friends of 
Annville and the institution. 

Miss Hattie Shelly was the guest of her friends of the College 
on May 14th. 

personals anfc Xocals. 

Rev. R. R. Rhoads, pastor of Dallastown U. B. Church, 
conducted devotional exercises in the chapel on April 25th. 

Rev. M. Rhoads, of St. Louis, Mo., after conducting de- 
votional exercises one morning in chapel, gave a very practical 
address to the students. 

Dr. S. J. Barakat, of Beriut, Syria, now a student at Union 
Biblical Seminary, addressed the prayer meeting on Tuesday eve- 
ning, April 17th. 

Drs G. A. Funkhouser and G. M. Matthews, the former 
senior professor of Union Biblical Seminary, the latter, associate 
editor of the Religious Telescope, attended chapel service April 25th 
and delivered interesting and helpful addresses. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



59 



President H. U. Roop spent a few days out of town in the 
interest of the College. 

Prof Norman C. Schlichter delivered a lecture on May 9th 
on the subject : "With Stevenson, Field and Riley in the Realm 
of Childhood." The lecture was well handled to the satisfaction 
of all present. Mrs. Dr. Roop delighted the audience with her 
charming voice with music set to words composed by these mas- 
ters of child nature. 

The College Quartette gave an appreciated entertainment on 
May 1 2th. 

At the recent meeting of the Board of Education in Dayton, 
Ohio, the college Presidents were appointed a committee to draw 
up an educational policy for the next session of the Board and for 
the General Conference. Our President, Dr. H. U. Roop, was 
appointed chairman of the committee. 

£be <&inckeninG power. 



The years of life had glided by, 

The end seemed e'en in sight, 

And even Sorrow's memories 

Were dim in evening light. 

The fear of death had slipped away, 
It seemed most good to rest ; 

To rest and sleep in safe repose, 
To leave life's eager quest. 

And then there interposed a Shape, 

A form of grace divine ; 
A something tender, brave and true, 

A diamond from the mine. 

Then Life once more began to stir, 
And Death reluctant burned, 

And work loomed up and hands grew strong 
And Rest seemed scarcely earned. 

While yet the task remained undone, 
Now upward coursed the sap ; 

And resurrection great occurred 

And spread o'er Nature's map. 

The eye uplift, the Shape behold, 

Strong, gentle as a dove ; 
And it, know you not what it is ? 

Courageous, joyous Love ! 

A Friend. 



6o 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



a Basket of Cbestnute. 



New student, (from the country) — "I say pard, what fer 
funny kind uv shirt has that fellow got with L. V. on it? " 

Old Student. — That is his varsity sweater. 

N. S. — "Golly, dad '11 think I'm a dead sport when he sees 
me marchin' home with one of them things on." 

Miss S. — "Fat" seems to me like a person with an exceed- 
ingly sweet disposition and a warm heart." 
Miss S.— "Why?" 

Miss S. — "Because he always tries to hold hands when he 
passes the sugar bowl." 

Miss M. says she wishes some fellow would take her to 
church some Sunday night, as she would like to know how it 
goes. 

Mr. B s — h called on seven different girls in one week, 

he says he will soon be around. We wonder what. 

DER DEUTSCHE. 

Where Hans will go when he is dead, 

'Tis very hard to tell, 
For he does not understand 

The distinction very well ; 
He gazes at the bright blue sky 

And says "Der Himmel ist hell." 

A priest who was out walking one Sunday, observed a little 
Irish girl playing and said to her: "Good morning, thou daughter 
of the Evil One." 

"Good morning, Father," she replied respectfully. — Ex. 

Sunday School Teacher — "What is a lie." 
Pupil — "A lie is an abomination unto the Lord and an ever 
present help in time of trouble. " — Ex. 

Jones. — "How is your boy doing at college?" 
Farmer Noost.— "Splendid ; getting high marks; first time 
he came home he had a pin with '99 on it." — Ex. 

Freshman : "I smell cabbage burning." 

Senior: "Perhaps your head is near the stove." — Ex. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



6 1 



Exchanges. 



"Railroads in Turkey" is the subject of an interesting article 
in the Gettysburg Mercury. It was written by Mr. Merdinyan, 
a native of Asia Minor. 

The Easter number of the Dickinsonian deserves special men- 
tion . 

The College Forum, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, 
Pa., makes its first appearance on our table this month. It is a 
neat little publication and the only fault we can find is that there 
is not quite enough of it. — The Susquehanna. 

The Forum Staff is encouraged by the favorable comments 
that appear in a number of our exchanges, and we hope soon to 
have the Forum enlarged so as to be able to accommodate more 
contributors. 

'"The faculty loved me, , 

And held me so dear, 
The}' asked nie lo repeat 

My Senior year " — Ex. 



Over 60 Weaver Organs 



ARE IN USE IN 
THE 

liblic Schools 



Baltimore. 



They were adopted after a severe con- 
test in comparison with six other 
maKes of organs of the highest 
grade 




Write direct to us for Catalogue and Trices 

WEAYER ORGAN and PIANO CO. 



Stephen Mubertis 

1125 and 1127 North Third St., 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Blank Book Manufacturer 

and JOB BOOK BINDER. 



Ruling 

Numbering, 



Wire 
Stitching. 



. M ANUFACTUB.ERS. 



YORK, PA. 



H.S. WOLF, 

—DEALER IN — 

Green Groceries 

and Confections. 

Restaurant in connection. 



If you want to Buy a Hat Right, aud a 
Right Hat, or anything in 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS, 

™™ Erb & Craumer, 

8th and Cumberland Sts. 
LEBANON, - - - PA. 



Harry Light 

Books anb 
Stationer? 



J? 



22 East Main Street* 
Annville, Pa* 



New, second-hand and shelf worn 

COLLEGE TEXT 
BOOKS. 

STATIONERY, 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES. 

Students' Supplies a Specialty. 

West End Store JS P fo h p o r- 

General — 
Merchandise 

Shoes and Gent's Furnishing Goods 
a Specialty. 

.34- 136 West Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

i860 1885 

J. HENRY MILLER, 

General Insurance Agent, 

S. W. Cor. 8th and Willow, 

LEBANON, PA. 

ALL COMPANIES FIRST-CLASS. 

E. B. MARSHALL, M. D 

NO. 34 EAST MAIN STREET, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

ESTABLISHED 1851. 

Tlieo Leonard! & Son 

LITHOGRAPHERS, 

5th and Liberty Sts., PHIL A. 



Diplomas and Certificates of 
nembership. 
Commercial Work our Specialty. 



3 



SHENK & KINPORTS., 

ANNVILLE, PA, 

ne " lers in Dry Goods, Notions, 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a specialty. 
Home made, Ingrain and Brussels Carpets 
You buy Cheaper from lie than away trom 
home, and have a large stock to select from 

J. G. GARMAN, 

B*A *R*B*E*R 

Livery Attached. E. Main St. 

JOSEPH MILLER, 

Furniture & Undertaking. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
M\L. C. WOOLF, 

Notions, Groceries, Etc. 

62 East Main St. 

Sheffey's Furniture Store, 

Cor. Main and 

White Oak Street. 
Undertaking A Specialty. 

JOS. A. SMITH, 

Hardware, Plain, . . . 

Stamped & Japanned Ware. 

ANNVILLE, - - P/. 

J. S. KENDIG, 
B • • K • Er • R 

Next Door to Hotel Eagle. 

Harry Zimmerman, D. D. S., 

H)ental IRooms, 

72 W. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 

The Northwestern Mutual LiL; 
Insurance Co., of Milwaukee, Wis. 

R. A . MAULFA1R, Gen. Agt., 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

All the latest and best policies issued. 

7V\. H. SHHUD, 

• — DEALER IN— 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

FINE 53 AND 
CANDIES «P FRUITS. 

Families supplied with OYSTERS. 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Vol. XIII. 



JUNE, 1900. 



No. 4. 



STAFF: 

Galen D. Light, 'oo, Editor-in-Chief. 
ASSOCIATE : 

Harry E. Spessard, 'oo. Alfred C. T. Sumner, '02. 

Henry H. Baish, 'ci. Charles W. Christman, '03. 

BUSINESS MANAGERS: 
S. F. Daugherty, '01, Chief. 
H. L. Eichinger, '03, Assistant. W. C. Arnold, '03, Assistant. 

The College Forum is published monthly by the Philokosmian Literary Society 
of Lebanon Valley College. 

The College Forum will be forwarded to all subscribers until an order is received for 
its discontinuance, and all arrearages have been paid. Address all business communica- 
tions to S. F. Daugherty, Business Manager, Box 184, Annville, Pa. 

All matter intended for the Forum should be submitted to the Editorial Staff not later 
than the 15th of the month preceeding its appearance in the Forum's columns. 

TERMS :— fifty Cents Per Year. Single Copy, 10 Cts. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as st eond-class mail matter. 



EDITORIAL. 



Effort. 



The third volume of the Bizarre, the 
Annual published by the Junior Class, 
came to the editorial staff of the Forum and 
was perused with much interest. It is a 
representative book of college annuals, presenting to the reader 
every department and phase of the college in an adequate manner. 
The mechanical part of the book is all that could be desired. It 
was indeed a noble effort and reflects great credit upon the editor- 
in chief, the business manager and their associates. 



JEmjltsb 

jfrien&sblp. 



That old grudge which the English and 
American nations have cherished, each to- 
ward the other, for more than a century, is 
fast becoming extinct ; neither is the one so 
ready as formerly, to suspect the other of hostile designs and to 
hold it up as one watching for an opportunity to do any injury. 
Indeed, almost the contrary is true. The citizens of the two na- 
tions now speak of one another as kinsman and show their feelings 



63 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



of friendship by considerations of an international alliance. 
When either individuals or nations have once come into relations 
of friendship and regard, they usually possess the capacity to ap- 
preciate such relation to a considerable degree, though often not 
to the fullest extent. We, therefore, believe that the people of the 
two great nations in question, for the most part, appreciate the 
amicable relations that have sprung up between them ; vet, we 
fear that they do not appreciate them as highly as they should. 
This latter statement seems almost more applicable to America 
than to England. The former, proud of a glorious past, and al- 
most over-confident in the strength of her unique present, natur- 
ally of course, does not feel very strongly the need of seeking the 
intimate friendship of foreign nations. She is thus liable, un- 
cautiously, to do those things which will alienate the sympathies 
of that nation, which, we are safe in saying, is the most friendly 
power of Europe and the advantages of whose moral support and 
friendship we can ill afford to be without. Since the South 
African War has been in progress, there have been found persons 
all over this broad land of ours, who are ready to make pro-Boer 
speeches and engage in other vehement pro- Boer demonstrations. 
Even in our National Congress are some who have become so en- 
thusiastic over that peculiarly American word "Independence,'' 
that they have been doing all in their power to induce that hon- 
orable body to pass resolutions of sympathy for the Boers, as if 
we can better afford to lose the good will of Great Britain than of 
the Boer Republic. Of course, it will doubtless be argued that 
these Boer sympathizers are patriotic ; or that they are convinced 
of the justice of the Boer cause. Well, patriotism that is true and 
genuine, is admirable, but patriotism based more on sentiment 
than reason, is a dangerous thing. Moreover, while we wish to 
give right to individual opinions when they are based upon fact, 
and while we do not take the stand that England is without fault 
in raging this war, it certainly has not been proven that the Boers 
are all right and England wholly wrong. Besides, it is folly to 
believe that the world will be made worse or even that the Boers 
themselves will be worse off by England's having a hand in the 
administration of affairs in South Africa. What the friendship of 
England means to us, we cannot fully comprehend. What it 
meant to us at the breaking out of the Spanish American War, 
when nearly all the other European nations were showing their 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



64 



teeth, could only be determined did we know what the result 
would have been had England joined with that grinning company. 
It certainly is not rash to suppose that things would be quiet 
different had this been the case. Neither is it rash to say that 
the good will of England is always to the advantage of America 
as a nation and that there are few more potent factors in the 
maintenance of the world's peace than the mutual friendship of 
these great powers. 

* 

The time is almost here for the quadren- 
TLhC "IRcal nial conventions of the great political par- 

flSSUC t * eS ' ^ e ( l uest ^ on naturally arises, What 
will be the real issue ? Judging from recent 
votes and spirited debates in Congress, the main issue will be ter- 
ritorial expansion. Although protective tarriff and a gold mone- 
tary basis will undoubtedly appear in the platform of the Repub- 
lican party, Free Trade and Bi-Metalism among the planks of the 
Democratic platform ; yet these will be secondary issues compared 
with the dominant issue of today, imperialism. Nov. 6, 1900, 
will determine temporarily, at least, the course of our foreign 
policy. The present administration's policy is well known, but if 
a Democratic president should be elected, Cuba would rule itself 
and the war in the Philippines would be stopped. Which is the 
better policy? Every voter must decide this for himself and vote 
for the party whose policy he believes to be preferable. 

Can tbe Cburcb 3>o Mttbout tbe College ? 

This question might be answered with one word, — an em- 
phatic no. But a more extended answer is desired, and reasons 
must also be given. 

That the church which has 110 educational institutions can 
not thrive long, has been proven many times in the last half cen- 
tury. And this is as it should be. It is the mission of the chnrch 
to supervise higher education. To the Church are given the Divine 
Oracles which are to be disseminated by her among all peoples. 
She is to teach wisdom and virtue. There can be no true wisdom 
unless tempered by the ethics of the world's Greatest Teacher. 
He who knows all the classics, the subtleties of philosophy, con- 



65 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



crete and abstract mathematics, the intricacies .of science, but 
knows nothing of the Christ and His teaching lacks the great, es- 
sential of being a wise man. For this reason young men should 
attend colleges controlled and supported by the Church, so that 
they may be firmly "rooted and grounded" in the faith before at- 
tending the Technical institutions (which are secular) of the 
country. 

The young of our land will educate. They will educate at 
home if the home furnishes proper facilities. But if the facilities 
at home are of an inferior kind they will seek them elsewhere. 
In this way many very promising and useful persons are lost to 
the Church. As much as it is the duty of the parents to provide 
the necessaries of life for their children until they are able to care 
for themselves, so much also is it the duty of the Church to fur- 
nish the facilities for mental development for her children. 

"Noneliveth to himself" should be practised more and more 
by the Church respecting her pal lad ii of Christianity. Not all who 
need and desire an education can get it, because it is beyond their 
means. Frequently those who are least able to attend College 
would make the best use, and serve best the church of their 
choice, if they were favored w T ith collegiate training. Then let 
the rich give of their surplus wealth to the struggling educational 
institutions of the church in order that their usefulness may be 
increased, that all who will may come and drink deep and often 
from wisdom's fountain. In this way, monuments, not of stone, 
but living monuments and witnesses for Christ, will be erected 
everywhere. These monuments will not be destroyed by the 
blasts of Time, but will last forever. 

Some churches have done in a measure what they could in 
this respect, and others are doing it now. The Church of the 
United Brethren in Christ, while she has done well in the last de- 
cade, has not done what she could. We are pleased to see the 
change in this direction. Especially is this true of Lebanon Val- 
ley College. Useful to the church as she has been through her 
three hundred Alumni for the last quarter of a century she will 
become even more useful as her facilities for work are increased. 
Let the more than forty thousand members of the cooperating 
conferences support her by sending their sons and daughters to 
their own college and by giving of their means until Lebanon 
Valley College takes first place among the schools of the denomi- 
nation, and stands in the front ranks of the colleges of the coun- 
try. Student. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



66 



Hlexanfter lPope. 

The period included between the years 1700 and 1745, known 
as the age of Queen Anne, is a very notable one in the history of 
England. The English people had at this time come to be great 
admyrers of France and French customs, and were governed 
largely by French influence. Pofligacy was manifest everywhere. 
Society had become dissolute and vice fashionable because of the 
influence of Boileau and the French classical school. Politics had 
become impure and the church lifeless and corrupt. The Wigs 
and Tories were contending for supremacy, each claiming that, 
under the administration of the other, the government must surely 
go down. With the politicians engaged in these struggles were 
allied the writers of the day, and they must be regarded as being 
of no small consequence in the strife. As a reward for their part 
in the conflict, they were given the petty offices at the disposal of 
the successful parties. Religious life was at a low ebb. The 
church had become divided into what was known as the high 
church and the low church. The leaders were men of the world 
and indulged in every kind of vice extant. 

A short time prior to this period, in the year 1688, Alexander 
Pope was born. His parents were poor and humble, but did all 
they could to give him a good education. He learned to read and 
write at a very early age. 

In 1 7 15, Pope moved with his parents, to whom he was ex- 
ceedingly respectful, to Chiswick, where his father died. With 
his mother he then went to Twickenham. Here he lived in se- 
clusion scarcely ever leaving his mother's side. His life was one 
continual sickness. He died in 1744, eleven years later than his 
mother. 

Pope was a man of extremely peculiar character. This was 
due, partially, at least, to his physical condition. On account of 
his bodily affliction he thought he should be unusually indulged. 
He was eccentric in the extreme ; it was next to impossible for* 
the servants of his household to do anything to please him. His 
character was a strange combination of contraries ; in many re- 
spects his actions exemplified the exact opposite of what he pre- 
tended. But there are good points in his character, which, 
though very few counterbalance a great many of his bad cpialities, 
and in estimating his character these must be taken into account. 



6 7 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



At a very early age Pope began writing. His principal works 
are, Essay on Criticism, Rape of the Lock, Windsor Forest, The 
Dunciads, Essay on Man and his translation of the Iliad of 
Homer. Of these, Rape of the Lock is his master-piece. It is 
founded on a London society quarrel and is a portrayal of high 
society life. His Essay on Criticism was founded on ideas se- 
cured from Lord Balingbroke, who afterward laughed at him for 
being the mouthpiece for opinions he did not hold. In this his 
political genius first became apparent. Windsor Forest and Pas- 
torals are artificial and false. Eloris to Abelard does not touch 
the reader. Eleg)' to the memory of an unfortunate lady is his 
nearest approach to the pathetic. 

In summing up in his "Study Window" his criticism on 
Pope, Lowell says, "A great deal must be allowed to Pope for 
the age in which he lived, and not a little I think for the influ- 
ence of Swift. In his province he still stands unapproachably a 
lord. If to be the greatest satirist of individual men, other than 
of human nature, if to be the highest expression which the life of 
court and ball-room have ever found in verse, if to have added 
more phrases to our language than any other but Shakespeare, if 
to have charmed four generations make a man a great poet, then 
he is one. He was the chief founder of an artificial style of writ- 
ing, which, in his hands, was living and powerful because he 
used it to express artificial modes of thinking and an artificial 
State of society. Measured by any high standard of imagination 
he will be found wanting ; tried by any test of wit he is unrivalled. ' ' 

Living in the first critical period of literature, so called be- 
cause of the attention to literary form and perfection of style, he 
has benefited the English language to a very great extent. He 
discovered its power of melody, and enriched the language with 
poetical elegance. He developed its capacity for terse and brill- 
iant expression. He made the dissyllabic line supreme for a time. 

Besides his influence upon the language he has benefited the 
public by his satires and reflected the thoughts of his day to us. 

J. Walter Esbenshade, '03. 

"Employment, which Galen calls "nature's physican, " is so 
essential to human happiness that indolence is justly considered 
the mother of misery,, 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



68 



Commencement TOeefc. 



BACCALAUREATE SUNDAY. 
The Commencement exercises of the College opened on Sun- 
day, June ioth. It was an ideal morning and a large audience 
was present. The chorus class under Prof. Oldham sang several 
beautiful anthems. Dr. Roop delivered the sermon, taking for 
his text, Psalm 144; 12 : "That our sons may be as plants grown 
up in their youth ; that our daughters may be as corner stones, 
polished after the similitude of the palace." Dr. Roop said: The 
144th Psalm is a Psalm of David as King. It is occupied with 
matters of public concern. It gives a picture of national prosperity 
and chief among the petitions in that prayer is the supplication in 
behalf of the grown-up children of the community. Let me direct 
your attention first to the prayer of people, and then to some coun- 
sels in aid of the object for which we pray. First. And first here 
let me signalize the significance of the fact that the people pray 
for the grown up children. When people pray they are thought- 
ful and they are brought to thought in this case by considerations 
both wide-reaching and profound. The manifestation of the pop- 
ular interest in those especially who complete a course of educa- 
tion, and make a more formal entrance into society, has become a 
feature of modern life, perhaps nowhere so pronounced as in our 
own land. Second. And note, now, how the people's prayer 
breathes the spirit of just pride and confidence as to what the 
grown-up youth can be. The possibilities of the graduates, in 
the time of the class of 1900, are larger than of any year before, 
and how much, no human being can divine. The garden of the 
Lord must be filled with strong grown trees, and the palace He is 
building has places for wondrously polished stones. Third. You 
may do well to note in addition the people's prayer in the context 
for the removal of the strange children, whose vanity and un- 
truthfulness mar and break and crush the youth that should grow 
up in strength and beauty. And, last of all, the praying people 
of the world would counsel your making religion the supreme 
thing in life. The special obligations of the educated mind to put 
God at the helm of life are incontestable. The sphere of the 
Christian scholar was never so wide and inviting as now, but it 
was never more exacting in personal devotion and holiness." 



6 9 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



At six o'clock a praise service was held on the campus by the 
Christian Associations, led by D. M. Oyer, President of Y. M. C. 
A. Parting words were given by the Seniors and others. The 
meeting was well attended. 

At eight o'clock, Dr. T. C. Carter. D. D., of Roanoke, Va.,. 
delivered an excellent and practical sermon before the Christian 
Associations, taking for his theme "Is the Young Man Safe?" re- 
corded in II Samuel 18:29. After speaking of the circumstances 
under which this theme was uttered the speaker considered the 
young man's safety from two points of view. First, Is he safe 
intellectually? Second, Is he safe socially? He spoke very 
impressively of the temptations peculiar to youth. 

The choir again sang several beautiful anthems. 

MONDAY. 

The most successful commencement yet held of the Conser- 
vatory of Music took place this year. There were five graduates 
of whom Edna Groff, Arabelle Batdorf, Anna Kreider and Lena 
Owens finished on the piano and Lillie Kreider in voice. The 
exercises indicated the performers to have undergone patient and 
excellent training. The last number on the following program 
was especially fine. 

The program follows : 

Organ, Prelude, Merkel. 

Prof. H. Oldham. 
Voice, (a) Sacred Love, Liszt. 

(b) Resolution, Lassen. 
I,illie Kreider. 

Piano, Octave Study, G. Licbling. 

Edna Groff. 

Piano, "Rouet d'Oinphale," Saint Saens. 

Anna Kreider. 
( Second p ia n 0 , H. Oldh a m . ) 
Voice, "Angel's Anthem," Schnecker. 

Lillie Kreider. 

Piano, Tarantelle, Thalberg. 

Lena Owens. 

Piano, Polonaise, Op. 22, Chopin. 

Arabelle Batdorf. 
{Organ, H. Oldham.) 
Voice, E. Strano Poter, "Faust." 

Lillie Kreider. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



70 



Conferring of Degrees, 
President H. U. Roop. 
Quintette, Hymn of Praise Symphony, Mendelssohn. 
Lena Owens, Arabelle Batdorf, Anna Kreider, 
Edna Groff. 
[Organ, H. Oldham.) 

TUESDAY. 

The Board of Trustees met on Tuesday of Commencement 
week. There was a large attendance of the members. William 
H. Ulrich, of Hummelstown, and who is one of the representa- 
tives of East Pennsylvania Conference presided. Enthusiam 
characterized the sessions for the members realized that they con- 
trol an institution which is fast coming to the front ranks in the 
educational world. They reelected all the members of the faculty 
except Prof. H. Lenich Meyer, of the Natural Science Depart- 
ment, who is succeeded by Prof. Thos. G. MacFadden, a graduate 
of Otterbein University, and of John Hopkins University. The 
latter will have the assistance of Prof. Howard E. Enders, class 
'97, Lebanon Valh^r College, and a graduate of the University of 
Michigan. The scope of studies in this department will be con- 
siderably enlarged. Prof. H. H. Shenk will take charge of the 
Department of History and Political Science. Prof. N. C. 
Schlichter was elected to a full professorship in French. Dr. 
Roop's report indicated a large growth in every department, an 
attendance of 290 students, and an income of $3000 above the 
annual expenditures. Besides the professors of the several de- 
partments, a number of assistants will be employed as circum- 
stances and conditions may require. 

In the evening the Alumni Association held a public meeting 
which was one of the best yet held. John H. Maysilles, '95, pre- 
sided. The musical parts were rendered by Prof. H. Oldham, 
Mrs. Simon Light, '82, Mary Kreider, '99, Ella Black, '96, and 
Kate Munima, '92. C. B. Wingerd, '97, delivered an oration on 
"Visions," H. B. Dohner, '78, gave an address on What the 
Alumni are doing for L. V. C, and Prof. N. C. Schlichter, '97, 
gave some original lyrics. 

Immediately after this the Annual Banquet of the Associa- 
tion was given at the Ladies' Hall. It was a sumptuous feast. 
Reno S. Harp, '89, was toastmaster, Dr. H. U. Roop, '92, Rev. 
D. Q. Eshleman, '94, and C. E. Snoke, 'oo, gave very appropri- 



7i 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



ate toasts. After singing the College song, the occasion was at 
an end, an event long to be remembered by those present. 

WEDNESDAY. 

On Wednesday afternoon the class of 'oo held its Class Day 
exercises. Though the program was lengthy, yet it was full of 
interest from one end to the other, and the large audience did not 
tire. It was one of the most interesting exercises of the week. 
The program follows : 

PROGRAM. 

Instrumental Quartette, Lillian G. Kreider, Lena M. 

Owens, Edna E. Groff, Annie E. Kreider. 
President's Address. Charles E. Suoke. 

Optimist, Enid Daniel. 

Pessimist, Ralph Donald Reider. 

Vocal Solo, Reba F. Lehman. 

Poem, H. E. Spessard. 

Prophecy, Fred Weiss Light. 

Dutch Address, D. E. Long. 

Instrumental Duet, Lillian G. Kreider, Lena M. Owens. 
Class Oration, Adam K. Weir. 

Wilier, Seth A. Light. 

Chronicle of Ages, G. Mason Suoke. 

Auctioneer, Rene D. Burtuer. 

Vocal Solo, Annie E. Kreider. 

History, Alvin E. Shroyer. 

Calendar of 1900, Nellie P. Buffington. 

Brotherly Presentation, Ross Nissley. 

Presentation to Girls, Clyde J. Saylor. 

Instrumental Solo, Edna Groff. 

Presentation to Boys, C. Madie Burtner. 

Presentation to Juniors, Nora E. Spayd. 

Response, Sue E. Moyer. 

Class Song, 

Ivy Oration, Oreu G. Myers. 

THE CLASS DAY SONG. 

H. E. SPESSARD. 

Just a song for 1900, 
Let it fill the gentle breeze, 
Let the curfew toll its fond and last farewell. 
No more will we roam the campus 
With our sweethearts by our sides, 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



72 



Nor our hearts be melted by some magic spell. 

Fondest memories may come and go 

Just like the fleecy snow ; 
But we will yearn for gladsome days of yore, 

To grasp our loving comrades 

With gentle hands; but now, 
Hail to thee, dear Leb'non Valley, 
Au-re-voir. 

CHORUS. 

Just a song for L. V. C. 

A jolly song of cheer. 
Our hearts are longing for those days of yore ; 

We leave behind the broken hearts 

And the friends we love so dear, 
Just one farewell, Leb'non Valley, 
Au-re-voir. 

'Neath the green trees on the campus 

On the olive cushioned floor, 
There's a band of jolly students kind and true. 

From yon weeping sugar maple 

Sings the robin to his babes 
While the rustic flag pole waves the white and blue, 

It is twilight ; and the moon reveres 

The merry songs and cheers ; 
That o'er the winged breezes gently soar; 

To you our fond professors, 

To comrades ever dear, 
Farewell, not to be forgotten, 
Au-re-voir. 

Though for aye we may be severed 
From our Alma Mater dear, 
There 'If be longings for those happy by gone years, 
Here we plant our emblem, Ivy, 
'Neath the quaint old fashioned eaves, 
And its roots we moisten with our dripping tears ; 
Though its language never may be spoken, 
It hides a peaceful token, 
A tribute from the brave ones gone before ; 



73 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Just think of us in earnest prayers 
As comrades ever true, 
For, we bid one loving farewell, 
Au-re-voir. 

In the evening the Conservatory Concert was held in the 
presence of many people. Every number on the program was 
vigorously applauded. Special praise must be given Director 
Oldham . The program follows : 

PROGRAM. 

Quiiitette, "Martha," Fiotow. 

Lillie Burkey, Ruth Leslie, Mamie Dean, 
Mary Zimmerman. 
{Organ, H. Oldham.) 
Vocal Solo, "O Saiitissima Vergine," Gordigiani. 
Lillie Kreider. 

Two Piano Duet, Etude, Pirani. 

Lena Owens, Edna Groff'. 
Vocal Trio, O Memory, Leslie. 

Reba Lehman, Grace Fisher, H. E. Spessard. 
Quintette, "Poet and Peasant," Suppe. 

Susie Moyer, Alma Engle, Elizabeth Stehman, 
Nettie Lockeman. 
K Organ, H. Oldham.) 
Violin Solo, Ballade et Polonaise, Vienxtemps. 

Madame Von Bereghy. 
Piano and Organ, "Faust," Gounod. 

Chas. H. Oldham, H. Oldham. 
Vocal Solo, "The Resurrection," Shelley. 

Anna Kreider. 

Chorus, "Oh Hush Thee My Baby," Sullivan. 

Chorus Class. 

Quintette, , "Zampa," Herold. 

Arabelle Batdorf, Edna Groff, Auna Kreider, 
Lena Owens. 
{Organ, H. Oldham.) 

THURSDAY, 

The Thirty- Fourth Annual Commencement of Lebanon Val- 
ley College, was held on Thursday morning, June 14th. The 
rostrum was neatly decorated with palms, lavender and white 
bunting, while the class motto, "Palma Qui Meruit Ferat," was 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



74 



suspended in the rear of the stage, and the front adorned with ivy. 
The graduates were attired in Oxford cap and gown, The music 
was furnished by the Steel ton Orchestra. Dr. Elias Hershey 
Sueath, Professor of Philosophy in Yale University, delivered a 
masterly commencement oration on the subject "Aesthetic Cul- 
ture." 

"I have selected the subject as announced on account of its 
great importance. It remains for the Colleges and Universities to 
stem the tide of materialism which has grown within our land." 

The speaker believed in the development of the material re- 
sources and stated that next to bodily wants stand education, so- 
cial and political wants. 

He spoke of the neglect of aesthetic culture because its im- 
portance is not generally recognized and continued: "Man is in 
his nature an aesthetic being. Man's aesthetic constitution is re- 
vealed in the anthropologic and psychologic study of man. Man 
by nature loves something that is beautiful. The bodily appear- 
ance has much to do in binding home affiliations with the wife. 
Bodily cleanliness is as much aesthetic as hygienic. The average 
man wants to look well." 

The speaker then cited the ideal of the Greeks in this respect, 
spoke of the influence of the aesthetic in social life, the home and 
the nation, and said : "Conventionalities and customs, our man- 
ners and sustenance are controlled by the aesthetic. What is true 
of social is true in the political field. Fitness and capability are 
recognized. In the moral and religious life there is a beauty in 
the model life and repulsion in vice. There is attractive beauty 
in good character. Extreme ugliness of sin causes people to 
shun it. 

"The religious life and the aesthetic are ultimately associated. 
Aesthetic culture is the servant of religion. It furnishes express- 
ion for the religious. The speculative mind has been led to God 
by the force of the beautiful. The aesthetic is an antidote for the 
skeptic mind. 

"A poem or a picture often will do more for religion than 
metaphysics or theology. In our daily life the aesthetic plays an 
important part. What a poverty-stricken life ours would be 
without aesthetics. Beauty rather than utility attracts the soul. 
It contributes wonderfully to the happiness of the human life. If 
our poetry, music, architecture and sculpture were taken away, 



75 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



much of our human enjoyment would be destroyed. Human na- 
ture would be wrecked were it not for the beautiful." 

The orator then spoke at length of the ways and means to se- 
cure aesthetic culture and stated that the time to begin is in the 
beginning, and continued by saying: "Aesthetic culture should 
begin with the child. The child loves beauty. Home is the first 
and leading agency. It should be a beautiful home. Beauty lies 
in simplicity. Beauty does not always exist in the luxurious. 
Education is not the process of a day and therefore a generation 
must be raised up to love the beautiful. 

"It remains for the schools and colleges to cultivate the spirit 
of aesthetic culture. Beside the home, the State can do much. 
Every commonwealth and city has a public building. These 
should be models of architecture. Every nation, State or city 
should have a park and garden system. They do much for the 
development of aesthetic culture. The art galleries of large cities 
do much for culture." The speaker advocated their multiplica- 
tion by the thousand and urged the importance of observing anni- 
versaries of the Nation, State and city as means to cultivate the 
aesthetic. 

The speaker pronounced the Church a great means to de- 
velop the aesthetic in man. 

"Church architecture and Church music should be the best." 

In concluding the masterly oration, Dr. Sneath spoke of the 
importance of the work done in the Kindergarten, High school, 
academy, and college. "The school and the college," he said, 
"should be equipped with teachers who are lovers of the beauti- 
ful. Every school and college should open its sessions with mu- 
sic. Drawing should be introduced in all schools for culture, and 
classical poetry will do much for the aesthetic." 

The speaker deplored the destruction of our forests, and ad- 
vocated that the beautiful in rock- formation and landscape be un- 
molested. 

The candidates for the various degrees and the subjects 
of their theses are as follows : 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE* 

Character Sketch of Queen Elizabeth, Nellie Buffmgton; The 
Doctrine of Becoming, Enid Daniel; Mental Processes of 
Thought-getting, Grant B. Gerberich ; The Heights, Fred Weiss 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



7° 



Light; Plato's Ethics, David E. Long; The Eternal Art, Lillian 
G. Kreider; The Supremacy of the Christian Standard of Mo- 
rality in Statecraft, Oren G. Myers; Commercial Expansion, 
Ross Nissley ; , Civilization Modified by Mountains, Ralph Donald 
Reider; The Analogy, Clyde J. Saylor; The Relation of the Will 
to Character Building, Alvin E. Shroyer. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

Charlemagne, C. Madie Burtner ; The Legitimacy of Con- 
science, Rene DesCartes Burtner; Madonna, Anna E. Kreider; 
The Fallacy of Mind Reading, Reba F. Lehman ; Hypothetical 
Reasoning, Seth A. Light; Christian Education, D. Augustus 
Peters; Man's Morality and Intellectuality — and Who Responsi- 
ble? J. Mark Peters; Value of Historical Knowledge, Charles 
Edward Snoke ; Labor as an Educator, G. Mason Snoke ; The 
Beautiful and The Good, Nora E. Spayd ; Mathematics, A Disci- 
pline for the Mind, H. E. Spessard ; The Papacy, Adam K. 
Weir; The College as a Formative Agency, Galen D. Light, '99. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE. 

Molecules and Molecular Theories, Howard E. Enders, '97 ; 
Concerning the Relation between Physiological Psychology and 
Pedagogy, Frank F. Holsopple. 

MASTER OF ARTS. 

The Teacher and His Work, John S. Gruver; The Relative 
Efficiency of Labor under its Several Systems of Employment, 
John Maysilles, '95 ; Some Aspects of Current Literature, Norman 
C. Schlichter, '97 ; The Moral Bearing of Political Science, 
Hiram Herr Shenk ; The Imagination, Charles B. Wingerd, '97. 

In the evening the Senior reception was given at the Ladies' 
Hall, many being present. This was a very fitting close for such 
a successful commencement week which will long be remembered. 

Cltotuan. 

Our school year has closed and we can truly say that it has 
been the most successful one for years. We regret that the Sen- 
ior girls are leaving us but we hope to profit by their good advice 



77 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



which they gave before they left. We are also glad we have girls 
still in the society who will volunteer to take the places of the 
outgoing Seniors. 

The elections for the following term are as follows : President, 
Sue Moyer, '01 ; Vice President, Alma Engle, '02 ; Secretary, 
Lizzie Stehman, '02 ; Treasurer, Emma Loos, '01. 

We regret that our numbers will be broken but we hope new 
girls will come in and fill our ranks. Lillian Krlider. 

IpbUokosnuan. 

The annual election of officers was held on June 6th. C. S. 
Bomberger was elected Librarian for the ensuing year. D. M. Oyer 
and J. Walter Esbenshade were re elected respectively treas. and 
society editor for the Forum. The members of the Lecture com- 
mittee were re-elected for the next year. The committee consists 
of the following persons : R. R. Butterwick, S. F. Daugherty, 
H. L. Eichinger, D. M. Oyer and H. H. Baish. H. H. Baish 
was elected Editor-in- Chief of the Forum to take the place of G. 
D. Light, resigned. C. W. Waughtel and W. O. Roop were 
elected to fill other vacancies on the editorial staff. 

On Friday evening, June 1st, a special program was rendered 
in the college chapel in honor of the Seniors A large number of 
visitors were present and the program was enjoyed by all. Mr. 
Shroyer responded for the Seniors in a few well chosen words. 
The best wishes of the society go with this class in its entrance 
into active life. 

The Philo wishes to the students and faculty an enjoyable 
and profitable vacation and hopes to see many faces both of old 
and new students at the opening of the new year. 

J. W. Esbenshade. 

athletics. 

On Wednesday afternoon, May 23, our base ball team met 
the Indians in a return game on the latter 's diamond, and won a 
clean cut, well earned victory. The game was intensely interest- 
ing throughout and was witnessed by a large crowd of people. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



78 



Worthy of mention is the spirit of justice and hearty good- will 
manifested on both sides, a condition which led each team into a 
higher regard and esteem for the other. 
The score by innings was as follows : 

Lebanon Valley, 1 2 o 2 1 1 1 o — 8 

Indians, 2000002 o — 4 

A game of base ball was played with the Reading Y. M. C. 
A. , on the College Campus, May 26. While the visitors were not 
a match for our boys,' they played fair ball and are commendable 
for the manly way in which they received their defeat. The game 
ended with the score 22-0 in favor of L. V. C. 

On Friday, June 8, the base ball team had a game with Villa- 
nova, in which it was defeated by a score of 12 to 6. This was 
the first defeat which our boys suffered on their own grounds dur- 
ing this base ball season and it is attributable to the apparent 
misfortunes of a single inning. Up to the end of the sixth inning 
the game was a tie, standing 5-5. In the seventh inning, Wint- 
ers did not have that perfect control of the ball which usually 
characterizes his pitching, which, together with several errors in 
the fielding of the home team, enabled the visitors to add seven 
runs to their list. In the eighth inning we succeeded in hammer- 
ing out the last run of the game, leaving the score 12-6 in favor 
of the visitors. The score by innings is as follows : 

Villanova, 01400070 x — 12 

Lebanon Valley, 01301001 o — 6 

On Commencement Day, June 14, an excellent game was 
played on the College Campus with the Susquehanna team of 
Harrisburg A large number of people were present to witness 
the last game of a most successful season for our team. It was a 
rare treat for the crowd. The game resulted in a brilliant victory 
for us, the score being 7-3. 

We sincerely hope that the high position which we have at- 
tained this year in the athletic world may not only be held in 
coming years, but that a still higher position may be reached. 
To be sure L. V. C. will be able to do this. 

"Education begins the gentleman, but reading, good com : 
pauy and reflection must finish him." 



79 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



personals anfc Xocals. 



This being the Commencement number we shall not have 
sufficient space to make mention of all the distinguished persons 
who came to witness the exercises, nor of the many friends, well- 
wishers and parents of students. 

Mrs. C. S. Daniels spent some days here on account of her 
daughter's, Miss Enid Daniels, graduating. 

Miss Nora Spayd and Nellie Buffi ngton enjoyed their praents' 
visit here during the graduation. 

Rev. R. R. Butterwick, class '01, attended the funeral of his 
uncle, Wm. H. Butterwick, at Friedensburg, Pa. 

Bishop E. B. Kephart conducted devotional exercises in col- 
lege chapel on June nth. He then gave a short address to the 
students. 

The north wing to the college is well on the way and will be 
quite ready to welcome students in the Fall term . 

The new Conservatory of Music which did very much for the 
grandeur and success of the commencement exercises is nearing 
completion. 

The Y. W. and Y. M. C. Associations of the college have 
decided to send seven delegates to Northfield this year. An ice 
cream stand was conducted during commencement week for the 
purpose of raising money to send the delegates. 

Dr. Roop enjoyed the visit of his parents during commence- 
ment. 

An invitation was extended to the Seniors and to the mem- 
bers of the faculty by Dr. and Mrs. Roop to attend a reception 
which was given by themselves in honor of the former. The 
event was a very pleasant one. Magnificent refreshments were 
served and Mrs. Roop delighted those present with her charming 
voice. The Doctor and his wife will long be remembered for this 
magnificent entertainment. 

On commencement morning Dr. Roop read a letter from 
Provost Harrison of the University of Pennsylvania, stating that 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



80 



graduates in the Scientific or Classical courses of Lebanon Valley 
College will be admitted to the Sophomore year in their Medical 
Department. This recognition is quite an honor to the college. 

The Art Department is assuming large proportions under 
Miss Baldwin of Drexel Institute and has bright prospects for the 
coming year. 

Dr. I. H. Albright, '76, has attended every commencement 
of our institution since '72, and challenges any one to make 
known a similar record. 

Prof. Oldham will hold summer classes. The subjects will 
be private lessons in Pianoforte, Reed Organ, Voice, Harmony 
and Pipe Organ. 

The opening of the new pipe organ took place on Thursday 
evening, June 7. It was a splendid treat to the music loving 
audience. 



The graduating recital was given on the afternoon of Friday, 
June 8. It reflected great credit on the performers. 



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